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https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

How does your culture view genealogy?

(If this is a better fit in the Duolingo general forum, I will move it. I thought it would fit here because I'm specifically asking about Latin American cultures.)

My husband's grandma is from Panama and always avoided conversations about her family history. She would brush off queries with "oh, that's an Anglo thing."

But is it? If you're from a Central or South American culture, could you speak to your experience?

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ESAndrew

I'm not Spanish, but what I do know is that it's a white American thing to say stuff like "I'm 39% Welsh, 23% German, 27% Indian, and 11% Italian. This annoys people like me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Oh yeah, I totally know what you mean there. It's wrapped up in how white Americans don't quite realize the extent to which white is the default, and long for some sort of cultural history. Except...that's like having a White History Month: every month of history class is white history month.

I'm thinking more like family history: What kinds of people your grandparents were, where they were from (like, cities rather than countries), what your great-grandparents did, how many siblings they had. The kinds of things your relatives might divulge if asked to share "family history."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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White male American here. The only reason I know anything about my grandparents is because I've met them. Well, except my grandfather, I don't know his name, but since I have a mother I assume he existed at one point.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RitaCunas
RitaCunas
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It may be more popular in America now than in other places, but Americans didn't exactly invent the interest in genealogy. Remember that for quite a few generations Europe was ruled by the aristocracy and a person's lineage was considered very important. Also look at all of the genealogical lists in the Bible. Apparently people ancient Israel were pretty interested in that kind of thing as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brand-M
Brand-M
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I only know the history of my family until my great great grandfather, he was a German who run away from the war and settle down in Colombia. He met my great great grandmother who was a native of the country, they had 3 kids, then those kids have more kids and so on, until me... The thing is, that none of them learn the language of my great great grandfather. That upsets me.

I could say that they were rich and poor, I mean, my grandmother tells me that my great great grandmother was so rich that "the servants hat servants", but her husband had a glambing addiction and lost everything...

There was a period where some people was persecuted for reasons that I don't want to write, most of my family went to Canada begging for refuge, and they don't like to talk about their past.

I think that most people who emigrate doesn't like to talk about their past... But I'm speaking in a very general way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I'm have a Mormon background so we are really into family history.

3 years ago