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"The train leaves at nine."

Translation:El tren sale a las nueve.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gmartins

why las?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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"las" is how Spanish expresses the concept of "at nine o'clock" or "at nine".

Or rather "a las nueve" is the same as the above expression. This works for all of the "o'clocks" except one o'clock which I'd have to look up. I'm sure someone will add the proper phrasing for one o'clock.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-_-user-_-
-_-user-_-
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i speak spanish as my mother tongue and for the time confusion here I can say that when you have in your watch two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven and twelve o'clock is plural so you have to say 'a las' and the number of the hour, an example, 'it's five o'clock' would be translated like 'son las cinco en punto', this is very formal and mostly used when you want to say something a litle bit or too much serious; when you want to meet somebody at a particular time is just a little bit different, an example, 'see you at five' this sentence would be translated like 'te veo a las cinco'. Now for the 'one o'clock' it is not plural, so you have to say 'una en punto', an example, 'it's one o'clock' that would be translated like 'es la una en punto', same thing like plurals it is formal, the other way to say it is 'es la una' this is less formal. In conclusion, if you want to say things in a formal way you can say 'son las' + number of the hour + 'en punto'; if you want to sound a little bit more natural you have to say ''son las' + the number of the hour both for plurals; for 'one o'clock' you shall say 'es la una en punto' this is the formal way and 'es la una' is the informal way. Hope this helps a little bit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristi315440

Thank you! That is a great explanation.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

So does each number have a gender? Or are they all feminine?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiracoMX

All feminine when referring to time.

Only 1 is singular, the rest are all plural: La una, las dos, las tres, las cuatro, las cinco, las seis, las siete, las ocho, las nueve, las diez.

As I said in another reply, it might be easier to see it as referring to military time. The last hours, from 1900-2400 hrs would go as follows: las diecinueve, las veinte, las veintiún, las veintidós, las veintitrés y las veinticuatro horas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

I think it's because it means "a las nueve horas" and "horas" is feminine. At least that's how I memorize this :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410
Kama410
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Oh, that helps a lot! It absolutely makes perfect sense! And it explains the plural, "las," too!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmartins

I see, thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

that is simply the way Spanish works, and we just have to figure it out and remember it

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Because nueve is plural. If it were one o'clock you would say: "El tren sale a la una."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiracoMX

If you said "el tren sale a la nueve", you'd be saying "the train leaves at the nine".

As fluent2B says, "las" is plural. You could just as well say "El tren sale a las nueve horas" to make the plural easier to spot. In this case, it'd be the equivalent of saying "the train leaves at 0900 hrs" (military time), and hours is also plural in English. So there you go.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladao
Vladao
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They always use "las" it is related to the hours . . . (horas) pluar exept, la una :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marknv

Couple questions/observations...My first instinct was to write "las nueves" and match the plurality. I know it's like saying "the nines", but I thought if "las"is plural, why not? I mean, the sentence didn't make sense when translating directly to English, but then again neither does "Las nueve" = the (plural) nine (singular). I just thought you always match plurality. Second question - Are there other cases where you can have a plural pronouns and singular nouns

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

You usually do have to match the plurality, but the hours of the day are an exception.

Just imagine the word "hours" after each time and it makes more sense. At nine (hours). = a las nueve (horas)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwallach

Would the verb irse work here too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

Ha! thats where the phrase "sally forth" comes from!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

I was skeptical, so I looked it up. Sally, in sally forth, and salir indeed both draw their roots to salire in Latin.

http://superbeefy.com/where-did-the-expression-sally-forth-come-from-and-what-does-the-phrase-mean/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mehmet.b.d

Why not 'deja a las nueve' ??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

Dejar means to leave, but not in sense of "leaving a location", but rather like "to leave something at a location".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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These are hover-over hints currently pointing towards using the verb "dejar". I notice that as I've gotten to around this point in the Spanish lessons the hover-over hints have gotten extremely misleading. I reported this and I would encourage other users to do so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mehmet.b.d

I see. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjhenley

I think "las" refers to horas, which is understood?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melonball6

Why "sale" and not "sala"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

3rd person singular conjugation of "salir" is sale.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiracoMX

"Sale" is to go out, "sala" is "living room".

"Sala" could also be the verb "to salt" something. Example: ES: Melonball sala la carne. EN: Melonball salts the meat.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

When I thought of that in the context of the sentence I imagine a train waving salt shakers wildly at 9 o'clock. I feel assaulted by this pun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brawny15
brawny15
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Irse should work here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwollaeger
mwollaeger
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What's wrong with "ferrocarril" instead of "tren"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brawny15
brawny15
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Ferrocarril is "railroad" which has the same difference between train in spanish as in English

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaliaukusti

Why can't I say "El tren va a salir a las nueve."?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicimgd

because even though they mean very similar things, the lesson is on the present tense, not the future informal tense (i. e. "ir a [infinitive]")

"is going to leave" =/= "leaves"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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The hover-over hints are giving "sale para algo" for "leaves" but this seems like it's introducing additional meaning, like "leaves for something", which is not in the English sentence. Is this just another error / sloppy hint / glitch, or is it common to actually add these additional words in a setting like this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tetrateeth

Looks like a sloppy hint to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boujleba
Boujleba
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What about "El tren se parte a las nueve"? Is it right? Muchas gracias

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justinthegermann

I thought los because el tren is masculine. I see how its wrong now

6 months ago