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  5. "De kommer fram till Amerika."

"De kommer fram till Amerika."

Translation:They arrive in America.

March 1, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfpeterson

This one confuses me every time because it sounds like "come from" but essentially means the opposite


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yeah, I can see why. :) Maybe it helps if you can associate "fram" with "front", rather than "from"? As that's what it means - "front" or "forward".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saqirltu

I just notice that I mixed "kommer från" with "kommer fram".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcillioFagner

I think it also happened to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/creativemetaphor

Oh that really helps to keep the word order straight, and makes more sense why it's 'till'. "They come forward to America." Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chlowls11

Sort of like "They come forward to America"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person222222

So "kommer fram" is gramatically differently than "arrive"? It seems like the most literal translation would be "go forth/come forth" as in "They go forth to America"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Hm… come forth often has another nuance that kommer fram doesn't. go forth I'd translate as åker iväg. Not sure this is helpful, hope someone else chimes in. Anyway the meaning of kommer fram is the same as in arrives. There's a word anländer in Swedish that appears to be closer, but it's less idiomatic to use that one in many contexts. Usually kommer fram is the most natural translation of arrives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tredjedotter

just out of curiosity: is English as confusing when learning -not counting the idioms- as Swedish? I think we have more words that fill in the many nuances a sentence can have, but when learning German, it has its vast differences, but it always seems logical. Was it difficult learning English as it seems for us foreigners to learn Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Not really, I can't even really remember learning English and I think many/most people here feel the same way – we're constantly exposed to the language, and we start learning it so early on in school. I agree English can feel like a not very logical language in some ways, but it's simple in that it's so very similar to Swedish.

If you feel Swedish isn't logical, it's probably due to bad teaching (could be our fault too).
It's notoriously difficult to judge 'which language can express more' or 'has more nuances'. Linguists will tell you every language in the world can express everything that other languages can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigswedeej

So if i wanted to say They arrive from America it would be De kommer fram från America??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, but it would be a lot more idiomatic to use De anländer/ankommer från Amerika.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GodiSandra

Why not "They arrive TO America." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSNuttall

That's just not how it's said in English; the preposition "to" isn't used with the verb "to arrive". (At least, not where I live, though this may not be true in all dialects.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissa201191

I think this is very similar to the dutch "aankomen" as in "we komen aan".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trilby16

This makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack_Boulet

Is "They arrive at America" not a proper sentence? English is my native language, but maybe I've gotten caught up in colloquialisms. Anyway, that sentence isn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sure, it's less common but certainly correct. I've added that now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSeez

On a Sunday in Battery Park...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick889093

They come until to America interesting way to get to arrive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

kommer fram till is literally "come forth to". I don't think that's much of a stretch, really.

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