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"Usted va a andar con ella."

Translation:You are going to walk with her.

5 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

So in this sentence, andar means walk, but in an earlier example with a horse, andar meant ride. Does andar only mean ride in the presence of a horse or something else you can ride, like a bike?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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  • andar = walk
  • andar a/en = ride (or montar a/en)

be careful, you can't use equivalently "a" and "en", some exemples:

  • montar/andar en bici[cleta]
  • montar/andar a caballo
  • montar/andar en burro/camello/mulo
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/le_meilleur

Con los pies es lo mismo que con el caballo. Se anda a pie

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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jr, Why isn't it "andar a burro, etc.? But it is andar a horse. They are all animals. Just asking.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryanlopez1084

i would like to know this aswell

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyDeschain
LadyDeschain
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Just because xD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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I see /andar/ in the original poster's information. Now I wonder if it was always there or edited.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LemonLee5

thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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When you want to say "walk" in español, what is the difference between "andar" and "caminar"?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ana295647

We use andar to go around or to walk around. You would walk around on a horse. Or you would go around on a bike.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maityty
maityty
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Thought exactly like you. That is why chose "sleep with her", but got a big no.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoesVanBos
LoesVanBos
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"You are going to date her." is not yet in lingo's database (8.5.2014.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Neither is 'you are going out with her'. as of 8/8/14.

I don't know if this meaning of andar is universal, but it is certainly wide spread and fits well in this sentence. It ought to be accepted, IMO.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DutchRafa
DutchRafa
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I agree. But it's still rejected @Oct/14...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaSte7

Yes, "to date" is another translation of andar, but I don't know if that is universal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"To date" ususally is salir, literally "to go out" (together)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyDeschain
LadyDeschain
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"Andar" = "to date" in México

In Spain it would be "salir" or "salir juntos".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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I think andar is a word best stayed away from until you figure out the exact use in the area you are speaking in. It seems to be used very differently in different countries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom_Moswen
Tom_Moswen
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I thought it was: Andar=go Caminar=walk. Whats the difference between caminar and andar?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7895123G
7895123G
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Caminar = to walk purposefully; walk to the shops or walk to work. Andar = to stroll or to amble

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beantorrent

Thanks. That's helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LemonLee5

thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12345679u
12345679u
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To her DOOM!!!, heck the previous statement was "she is going to suffer."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

Does andar also mean " to go" ? Could this senence also have meant " You are going to go witth her " ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

That was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Out of interest, what does this English sentence mean to you, and others?

In Hiberno-English, "to go with someone" means "to date someone", and that is exactly what the Spanish means too, but I wonder is is true in other Englishes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tanisia01
Tanisia01
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What if you wanted to say, "You are going to ride with her." Is in, both of them are going to ride horses together. Do you have to include horse in the sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeganRanda

"Andar" can also mean "to go out" (as in "to date"). Therefore, the sentence could also translate to "You are going to go out with her" or "You are going to date her". Without more context, the meaning is open to interpretation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duovincenzo
duovincenzo
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Why does is there a male voice now?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puritatem

Is this sentence natural in English? I am Spanish, but I think this sentence is not the same in English...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacy356

Yes, if it was your mother telling you that you had to walk with the unpopular girl what do you liked it or not.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

That va a andar...just one brief ah sound.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JezboJohnson

wondering if "andar con" might colloquially be used to mean the same thing as to "hang out" with her

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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It means to date, or go out with someone. To me it implies more than hanging our simply as friends.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grandmompam

DL said andar means "to be". I never learned that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Or else!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sebastian541605

Does it mean to walk around

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dishant96

why 'you're going to ride her' wasn't accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PoofBallDaily

....I dare you. Lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph297228
Joseph297228
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Let me clarify my view. If one would say "Usted va a andar en Italia con ella", it would translate to "You are going to go to Italy with her". By removing the words " en Italia" from the original phrase, the translation becomes "You are going to go with her".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miles_b

Ir is "to go." Andar is "to walk."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

What about caminar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ddbeachgirl
ddbeachgirl
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As this is the future tense lesson, why not Usted andará con ella ? Is this something that would be said?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tumler100

How do you say: You are going FOR a walk with her"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wontlookdown

I know I ask a lot of questions, but why is this "a andar?" And not just "andar" (to walk)? Is this because it's a specific action?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
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Ir (conjugated) + a + infinitive of main verb

is a Spanish tense for the near future, FUTURO PRÓXIMO, often translated to

to be (conjugated) + going + infinitive of main verb

Ir a + infinitive http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/47

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hasankeser1979

In order to try, I wrote "you shall" instead of "will or going to". Duolingo rejected!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph297228
Joseph297228
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I translate it as "You are going to go with her". Andar = to go

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reichdalmeida1

THis is a "Google type," awkward translation. "Va a andar" can mean a host of different things. E.G You are going to be around with/ accompany/ If a "he" is going to "andar" with a "she" may even grow into an entirely different level. This is the most literal and less likely translation.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

In an old form of American English to walk with a girl meant to court her. Is there any of that connotation in this?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GerryGriff

In Ireland, it would be "safer" to use walk in this example. A "ride" has a very different connotation!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

Pues ¡ándale! ;-)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jml646982
jml646982
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Andar simply put, means GO

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miles_b

"You are going to go walking with her" wasn't accepted. While the original sentence doesn't use the gerund form, "andando," it's a more natural translation into English. Translating the infinitive into an infinitive creates an awkward sentence in English.

3 years ago