Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"¿Qué es la deuda pública?"

Translation:What is the public debt?

5 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/karimagon

Does this refer to the national debt? If so, that should be the preferred translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tedsmoker

Technically any public sector entity, such as schools, towns, cities, counties, states, as well as nations can carry "public debt," but in most contexts it is used interchangeably with national debt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_debt

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
  • 25
  • 24
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5

Public debt does not necessarily have anything to do whatsoever with national debt. I could owe a public debt. Los Angeles County could owe a public debt. If wikipedia says that public debt is the same thing as national debt, it's wrong. The public debt of the United States is of course the same thing as its national debt, but the possessor of this debt is not specified in this sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
Mod
  • 22
  • 18
  • 18
  • 14
  • 8
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

It seems quite equivalently used. And according to wikipedia government/public/national debt are the same things.

Google has 332M of entries for government, 294M for national and 273M for public, so it's equivalent. But if we should preferred national over public, according to the numbers government should be preferred over national..

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The U.S. treasury calls it "public debt." Politicians, and politically oriented people call it "national debt.", I believe.

https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/resources/faq/faq_publicdebt.htm

If you type "government debt" into google, it first gives "national debt". The next few entries are "government debt" and "national debt". "Public debt" is not listed in the first five pages of Google responses. The White House has an article on "National debt" on p. 5 of Google.

Items returned in google are ordered in popularity of inquiries, not number of sites, I understand. Thus "public debt" appears to be less common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
  • 17
  • 14
  • 4

I think that this question is not asking how much the public debt is, as one might think in English, but rather a definition of what the public debt means, what is included in it. ¿Qué opinan?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obrendan

I agree. My guess is that if the question were asking how much it would probably be "Cuánto es", and the "la" is used because "deuda" is an abstract noun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beeohdee

Thank you! I was totally confused about this! (that?) ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 973

@Melita Based on what I've learned regarding "que es" being used exclusively for asking for definitions, I agree with you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Did you have a problem understanding the word DEUDA? The voice seems to glide right past it. Without looking at the screen, I could not catch the word...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 287

Might I say "Cuál" instad of "Qué"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 973

My understanding is that you can, but I think the reply would be something other than a definition. But I don't know if Duolingo will like it as I've never tried it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 4

Definitely, in Spanish it asks for a definition, explanation about “la deuda pública“.
Perhaps, talking very colloquially “qué“ can be used to mean “cuál“ or “cuánto“, which I cannot imagine respect to public debt. But rather e.g. “¿què es la deuda que tienes con ese hombre? “.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5

If it were to mean that, then the question would probably be "what is public debt?" That would ask what meaning of public debt is. If you add in the "the" then, to me, it seems more like the question of how much it is. But those are just my thoughts xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6
  • 2

I'd say you're right Melita, but perhaps in conversational Spanish the same applies as in English where "what" and "how much" are often interchangeable. Some input from a native speaker would be good.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

Could this also simply be "What is public debt?" - someone asking for a definition, and thus the article 'la' for deuda referring to the general abstract concept and not some specific quantity potentially known?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

I think so. It might also be rhetorical, if someone were giving a lecture about the concept of public debt, or making a political speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignacio866002
ignacio866002
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Que es la deuda publica = what is public debt/the public debt (what is it). Cual es la deuda publica = what is the public debt (how much is it/which one is it). This should be corrected to reflect this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALeZG
ALeZG
  • 19
  • 11
  • 8
  • 70

I tried without the article the, but Duo said no.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6
  • 2

Yep. I just don't get this one. Several native Spanish speakers have said that "¿Qué es la deuda pública?" is asking for a definition of public debt, and this question best translates to "What is public debt?" I'm guessing the object article "la" is required in Spanish for both "public debt" in general, and "the public debt" specifically, so either answer should be acceptable, but again, yours is better because it avoids ambiguity. "What is public debt?" can only be asking for a definition. "What is the public debt" could be asking for a definition of the specific public debt, but it is more likely to be asking "How much is the public debt?" and as several people have pointed out this would be "¿Cuánto es la deuda pública?" or "¿Cuál es la deuda pública?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nashrambler
nashrambler
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 1775

When do you use qué es and when do you use cuál es? They don't seem to be interchangeable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 283

I think "que" (with accent) is asking for a definition of the word, its meaning. Not "how much". Cual (w.a.) equates closer to "which".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin_Emily_
Erin_Emily_
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I don't know what it means neither in english nor in spanish...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14

Good one, Apple Bloom, thanks for your honesty!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

What this sentence is trying to tell us, that is, what it means, does not matter.

The only thing that matters is whether or not we can read the sentence, whatever it says.

And the only way to validly understand what the sentence is about is by knowing what was said before this remark occurred in the converstation. And that information is not available. So spending any effort to decypher this sentence's meaning is a futle activity. And even nonsensical.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emesik
emesik
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6

Am I the only one who hears "que es la droga publica" here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beeohdee

I too have had a hard time with many of the wav files. Some of them sound as though they're recorded on an old piece of magnetic tape that has gotten too hot! Like this one. You get used to it after a while and just accept that there was no way to understand it initially.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IforGot2
IforGot2
  • 25
  • 19
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1075

Can native speakers clarify is 'deuda' when spoke as part of a fluid sentence get swallowed up on the last syllable or if it's just the sound file here? You can clearly hear DEUDA when playing it individually but in a sentence it sounds weird.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

So does "deuda" sound like "duda" or is the voice screwing up pronunciations again???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scorellis

It sounds like "dilda" to me. I swear there is an "l" in there...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 9

Answer: one big scam by private banks. http://www.positivemoney.org/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertDuke

A debt to society?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FanfanFran

Why cant we say "cual es la deuda publica"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abtara
abtara
  • 24
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8

Man, the voice sounds so frustrated by this. Definitely fits.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

What a taxing question.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger654478

is that not what is known as the 'national debt'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lochinvar27

why is "public deficit" not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PianistKevin
PianistKevin
  • 22
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3

la respuesta es siempre ¨alta, demasiada alta¨

9 months ago