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"Yo me comí el resto del queso."

Translation:I ate the rest of the cheese.

5 years ago

142 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/warrio1010
warrio1010
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Why not just 'Yo comi el resto del queso'? (No accents)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

comerse (using me) intensifies comer. I ate it all up. Comer is used this way when a specific quantity of food is consumed.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Now that I'm almost to the end of the lessons and have seen comer about 500 times, suddenly they introduce a reflexive form, comerse?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Fluent: Más vale tarde que nunca", ¿no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Sí, por supuesto.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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It has been introduced much earlier than this Fluent2B!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesWashi

A lot of the verbs we learned are reflexive

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LobsangC
LobsangCPlus
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Good to note!!! Para una buena fortuna en Espanol (~).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NedWhite

Comparto tu pena. I suppose you could say:"I ate UP the rest of the cheese". Anyway, I think "me" is redundant here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adaitsman
adaitsman
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Nope, it's not redundant; it adds stress -- the "UP" in your translation. The problem with duo's translation is that it makes it appear redundant, but it really does change the meaning of the sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NedWhite

Tautológico a mi amigo. !TAUTOLÖGICO!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindafraser
lindafraser
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Or, you could say, "I ate the rest of the cheese myself" to show an intensification that "I" did it and no one else, as adaitsman says.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

In slangish English we can say "I ate me a big steak today!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

Historically, English reflexive pronouns were even used as subject or object pronouns, often to emphasise or intensify . From Shakespeare's Julius Caesar:
"Myself have letters of the self-same tenor."
(If you have access to the really big multivolume OED - i.e. the OED itself - you can find many more examples like this.)

However, DuoLingo did not like my answer. "Myself did eat the remnant cheese". I wonder why.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

In English, it would be redundant. In Spanish, this verb can be reflexive or not. As others say, making it reflexive gives emphasis and changes the meaning. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/comer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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Fluent, you say you are almost at the end on Level 14. Are there not tons more lessons?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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You are almost at the end of the skill tree Melita - after that it is just refreshing your skills - but there is some variation - e.g I didn't come across this construction the first time round.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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Gracias, Aidan. A partir de ahora, tengo que escribir sólo en español...si es posible :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hg6789
hg6789
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If so, why is 'I ate the rest of the cheese myself.' wrong? I thought that was what it wanted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Same thought here!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl1
Cheryl1
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It's more like: I, myself, ate the rest of the cheese. although I don't know if that would be accepted. I ate the rest of the cheese myself may imply that you were alone when you ate the rest of the cheese even though you didn't say ''by myself''. When using reflexive constructions, myself, herself, himself, etc are omitted because we already know that the action of eating the cheese is reflected back on the subject ''I'' in this case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewfbyrnes

I don't think "I ate the rest of the cheese myself" implies that I am by myself, only that I did the eating by myself. One could say, "Oh, you're full? Well, then, I'll eat the rest of the cheese myself," which doesn't imply that the other person has left the table.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randtx

Or someone saying did they leave any cheese? and responding Yes, but I ate the rest of the cheese myself. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MinombreesDJ

I wrote "I myself ate the rest of the cheese". It was not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

I wrote the same. I don't see why it is wrong. For example, someone could ask, "Did your friend eat the rest of the cheese?" and you respond, "No, I myself ate the rest of the cheese." I shall report it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

That's because it's wrong. Why did you put "myself" in there?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindafraser
lindafraser
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"I ate the rest of the cheese myself." is accepted as of 03/13/17.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

rspreng - Could this also be translated as I ate the rest of the cheese myself?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susiseller

That's what I thought - but I got marked wrong for "I ate up the rest of the cheese"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiskPidge
DiskPidge
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Very helpful explanation, thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MangoCam
MangoCam
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Basically i ate the rest MYSELF

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alec_Walker

And so "I ate up the rest of the cheese" should be the better answer!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scottie92

i put "i ate up all the cheese" but wasn't accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShastaLass

You didn't eat all of it, just the rest of it--don't know if "all that was left of the cheese" would be accepted.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emieye
Emieye
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Gracias!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

The "me" = myself

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Well, if I ate the cheese it must be me that ate it. ;) Comer is one of a few Spanish verbs that are used reflexively in a redundant manner. Comer is used that way when a specific quantity of a food item is eaten. "A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish" has a few paragraphs about the practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShastaLass

Wouldn't "I myself" be "yo mismo"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I wrote a very extensive description of what this usage is about, here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/789137

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGergen

Thanks, this is a great explanation. I am going to post this link in another discussion as well where I think it will be of use. Hope you don't mind!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisOlmst

I have spent a lot of time this morning trying to understand how your description works without conflicting with other experts.

From :http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/reflexive1.htm The purpose of the reflexive object pronouns is to show that the action of the verb remains with the subject.

Using your example: Él se sienta. He seats himself. He takes a seat. He completes the action of sitting. I was thinking that "completes the action" meant the action was done (i.e. past tense) But, in this case because taking a seat is done relatively quickly once started it does not matter if it is still in progress, is done or is done done (includes brief adjustments after being in the seated position). Even with English's narrower definition of the present it all works without being past tense.

Then I tried to apply this to the past tense ( Yo me comi ). After a break I realized that I am still associated because I was the last person to eat the cheese.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

"The purpose of the reflexive object pronouns is to show that the action of the verb remains with the subject."

Honestly, I think this statement is just not very helpful. It's not exactly wrong, but it's not a description that comports easily with the intuitive logic of English for anything but the classic cases where reflexive represents performing an action on yourself. (e.g. Ponerse, which can be used to describe putting on a piece of clothing -- i.e. putting it on yourself.)

For the reflexive passive, "Se habla español aquí," it's not like the language Spanish speaks itself. So how does "the action fo the verb [remain] with the subject," exactly? "Spanish" is the only noun available, and so the grammatical subject becomes the thematic object, and the thematic subject is elided. In English, that's what the passive voice is for. So: "Spanish is spoken here." It seems MUCH more useful to teach this to English speakers as, simply: The reflexive is used quite often to do the same thing we do with the passive voice. If you know that, when you hear a reflexive and it doesn't seem to make sense as an active-voice verb, you can mentally check to see if it makes sense in passive.

As for "he seats himself" or "he takes a seat", those are both present-tense constructions. So is, "he sits". We just use slightly different verbs, in this case, to describe continuous vs instantaneous actions; it has nothing to do with tense. In other cases, the present-tense verb may be ambiguous. For instance: "He falls." Absent any context, it's likely that this describes either the initiation of falling or the process of falling, rather than the complete action that actually includes hitting the ground. The mental picture it generates is either somebody tipping off a high point and starting to fall, or somebody falling through the air like a skydiver. However, given the right context, it could be the same as, "He falls down," which describes the entire process.

I have no idea how the caer / caerse distinction would fit with the "action remains with the subject" idea. The subject is the only actor involved in falling, regardless; it's an intransitive verb. The reflexive clitic that gets tossed in is not a real grammatical object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrickrward

Creo que mi profesor de español diría que en este caso que "me" es un pronombre intensivo (no es necesario como un pronombre reflexivo) y que la traducción como "I ate the rest of the cheese myself" es correcto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/btboyd90

Whether you're using comer/comí (ate) or comerse/me comí (ate up), you need an accent over the i in the past.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piano.z
piano.z
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Just think of it as this- it's an idiomatic expression. It's probably also an example of Rule 99- it is what it is, just because.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetalGear95

Why are people so literal when translating, its a different language......

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DolevFreun

I, me! myself!! alone!!! with no extra help!!!! ate the rest of the cheese.

Hope I helped :)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

I love this, in the south of France where I come from they say this too: je me suis mangé un bon fromage... ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

How about "I ate the rest of the cheese myself" as another way of intensifying that I was a pig? lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

This isn't a true reflexive; it's reflexive as completed action. I posted a link to further discussion above.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGergen

This is what I put. DL was not cool with it :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenEvoy

I believe that this is just the idiomatic use of "comerse" as having the connotation of scavenging, or eating what's left. I had to dig through a few dictionaries to find this, and this is my first post, although the discussions here have been very helpful to me (thank you for that). Please be gentle if I don't have this right ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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The Duolingo owl is obsessed with cheese.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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And strawberries.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

¡Y manzanas también!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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And crabs!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beansrowning

This is a great discussion, because for years I always learned using the reflexive of comer towards yourself implied "I am eating myself". Always learning something new.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

That's how it looked to me on the first reading.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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Is "I ate up the rest of the cheese" also correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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100%, but still not accepted!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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same problem here. reported. so should you do.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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This is what I put - still not accepted 18-Jul-2015.

However, the "up" is kind of redundant in English because we're talking about "the rest" of the cheese, so I can kinda understand why it isn't accepted. I'll report it regardless.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarlNydahl
JarlNydahl
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I finished the rest of the cheese. That's the understanding I get from this sentence. "I ate the rest of the cheese" doesn't seem enough.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swede15
swede15
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Porque no puedo decir "I ate the last of the cheese."? A mi parace bien. Ademas todo mis amigos dicen aci.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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They failed me on "ate up". Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thornarm

Because Duolingo was designed by the creators of Apple Map? :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adaitsman
adaitsman
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Makes no sense. The reflexive form intensifies it, and the only way to do that in English is "ate up." Duo's algorithm needs calibrating.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Well, you can use an alternative verb like, "devour" or "gobble" or something like that. But yeah, "ate up" is the easiest / least disruptive to the rest of the translation.

The thing is, because of the appearance of "the rest", the implication of completed action (see link above) is actually already present in the sentence, in either language. I think makes it reasonable to just go ahead and use comerse. Similarly, if you wanted to translate, "I ate the whole apple," or, "I ate all of the cheese," you might want to go with comerse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

Love all your input, but I am not sure "ate up" is proper grammar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

"ate up" is completely proper. It is one of hundreds of idiomatic phrasal verbs that are used extensively in spoken English. We don't use them so much in very formal situations and many have more formal, one-word synonyms.

They exist and are widely used in both American and British English (as well as other varieties of English), but a lot of them have different meanings or may use different participles to convey the same meaning.

Other examples from American English using 'up' and having the same general meaning of 'completely' are: finish up, use up, and burn up.

They tend to be difficult for even advanced learners of English to master.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

It is very common in American English. Not sure about British.

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/eat-up

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Equally common in British English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rapunzela2

"I gobbled up the rest of the cheese" was rejected

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I'm guessing this is mostly just because it's hard for the folks developing DuoLingo to think of every single possibility... Though there's also the fact that Spanish does have a couple other verbs that are evocative, or onomatopoetic, in the same way "gobble" is in English -- specifically engullir (which sounds a bit like the English word "gullet"), and gluglutear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YliyahMill

Why not " I ate the rest of the cheese myself "?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dxm300
dxm300
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I understand that this may be a usage that does not REQUIRE the use of the word "myself"; however, that does not mean using the word "myself" is not just as correct as that usage. Come on, Duolingo. Fix this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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¿Te llamas “Speedy Gonzales“?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeWeiss

¿Charlie?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanJ.Polasky

I answered with 'I ate up the rest of the cheese', and was marked wrong. What gives here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Strodi
Strodi
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I wrote "i ate up the rest of cheese" and it was marked wrong. Dios mio!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanJ.Polasky

Sometimes I wonder if we are studying the same language as the one Duolingo is teaching. Yes, my understanding (and my translator's, too) is that 'comerse' = to eat up.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Strodi
Strodi
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Google translate translates 'comerse' to 'devour'. seems legit to me...:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

You could call this use of se "idiomatic" as a literal word for word translation would not lead to the native translation. There are things that don't have exact literal translations that you just need to learn whenever learning a foreign language. The se in this case is similar to it's use in "quejarse". I am going to complain is translated "voy a quejarme". It doesn't mean "I'm going to complain to myself", nor does it mean "I myself am going to complain" as a way of intensifying that I'm the one going to do it. It just means I'm going to complain. You can't say "voy a quejar".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dumbass1971

Voy a quejar....it seems that you can...how about I just leave out the ridiculous ideosynchrocies of proper Spanish such as clarifying that I am the one that ate the cheese when I already clearly stated I was the one that ate the cheese when I said yo comi...who knows, maybe everyone else will come to their senses and start leaving out these unnecessary duplications, because after reading down through this entire thread nobody has explained clearly why it is unclear who has eaten the freakin' cheese!!!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

This may just be troll food but I'll reply.

It's not redundancy. It changes the meaning. Regarding the cheese, it's how you say that you ate all of it and not just ate some of it.

The question to ask yourself is: do you want to sound fluent like a native speaker, or do you always want to sound like a gringo that says things that sound wrong and often don't make sense or don't convey the meaning you think it does and people listening to you have to figure out what you're actually trying to say?

If you want to learn a language with perfect grammar rules then you will have to learn one of the recently created languages that was planned beforehand, rather than all of the other human languages which evolved and developed and is a hodgepodge full of idiosyncrasies.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanJ.Polasky

Sometimes I wonder if we are studying the same language as the one Duolingo is teaching. Yes, my understanding (and my translator's, too) is that 'comerse' = to eat up. That's also the way I learned the meaning of the verb, originally, and I don't believe it has substantially changed, in the interim. To me, the matter is (if you don't mind my saying so) 'cut and dried'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leahseiden

¡Es muy bueno aprender el reflexivo, pero no hay explicación ni traducción para ayudarnos...no es bueno, especialmente si se usa el app!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/60tvaldez

I ate myself some cheese!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

"I ate me some cheese" in Appalachia

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Ugh!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gismon

yes, I can see this coming in handy..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randtx

I answered the correct I ate the rest of the cheese.. then it occured to me just as I was clicking check, was the real intent to say. I ate the rest of the cheese myself? thus the yo me? and reading some comments guess it was was at some point.. FWIW saying I ate the rest of the whatever myself would be a common enough statement in English. as would of course someone saying I ate the rest of the whatever.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randtx

I ate the rest of the cheese myself. accepted as a correct answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

"I ate me the rest of the cheese" is what I would say where I grew up (Southeast US)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gulmer
gulmer
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"Yo me comi" seems awfully redundant. It seems like just Comi should suffice, no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adaitsman
adaitsman
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For the accepted translation it is redundant. The reflexive pronoun in the sentence, which you can think of as a doubling of the subject, adds stress. Duo's accepted translation is simply wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gulmer
gulmer
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I thought so. Well, it's free. Who can complain...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

It's actually more subtle than just "adding stress".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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Why in the heck is the "me" needed in this sentence. Would there be anyone who would not realize this person was referring to him/herself. Is Spanish this freakin' cumbersome? The subject pronoun "I" could not make the sentence any more clear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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It's just for greater emphasis.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

It's not for emphasis, it's the way we say it in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fay306893

yo me comí el resto del queso Why the "me" why do just: yo comí el resto del queso

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NurseStephi

Why not use "de la" instead of del? I ate the rest OF (de) THE (la) CHEESE? I am confused....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fay306893

queso is masculine - so it would be: de el queso, and "del" is the contraction for "de el"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NurseStephi

Ohhhhhhh brain fart. Got it. Thanks!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fay306893

I get those also. LOL

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NurseStephi

Hahaha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andhaz
andhaz
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me comí implies eating up big time doesn't it?? It should have just been Yo comí.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

Interesting discussion about reflexive verbs, but, my question is actually about "resto." :) If I think of it as "the rest," my brain goes to the verb usages, not a thing. If I think of it as "the remainder," it will probably stick better for me. Just want to make sure that is actually a reasonable translation before I let it settle too firmly! So, would that work? Many thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mosa139010

cdhicks over 800 days omg well done

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatsyAnn27

I'm not sure if this will help, but in some parts of the English-speaking world, a person might very naturally say, "I ate me the rest of the cheese!" This wording would convey a sense of smugness, or unusual accomplishment. Other examples of this kind of wording might include: "I got me a girl!"; "I ate me a two-pound steak!" It's not common where I now live (southern Ontario, Canada), but I did hear it fairly often at my former location, just an hour away.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdgorton

How would you say: "I, myself, ate the rest of the cheese."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adaitsman
adaitsman
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Here are a couple of possibilities:

"Yo, personalmente, comí el resto del queso."

"Yo, mi mismo, comí el resto del queso."

There may be more.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

No, those possibilities are not quite right. Just think this is one of those times when Spanish is the way it is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/likethree

gasp! Scandalous!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trezost
trezost
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is "comerse" synonym to "engullir" (gobble)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

No necessarily. Yo me comí un pescado en la cena (I ate fish for dinner). Me engullí el pescado en la cena (I devoured a fish for dinner)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathyrn8

I'm surprised el resto means 'the rest of' in English. Is there a Spanish word for 'remainder'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

El resto.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidA.Foo

I don't understand why both yo and me are necessary in this sentence; it confused me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Because in Spanish is ok to say yo me como or yo como. It's just the way it is. Note: I'm not saying they mean the same all the time, I'm just daying5 that the verb comer is conjugated both ways.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

The cheese did not eat me...eating the cheese did not eat me...this is frustrating....

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

El queso me comió (not reflexive). Ha ha.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnR504873

Is it not just preterite, and that is it?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iloveafullmoon
iloveafullmoon
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Sounds like I rest my case. lol

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudyGasparelli

Duo didn't like "I devoured the cheese."

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

Rudy I went the same route with "I gobbled up the cheese" - was curious to see if it would be accepted

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

PLEASE! can anyone tell me why descansar is not reflexive? I rested - it seems "I" - the doer of the action is also the receiver of the action - "rest"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adaitsman
adaitsman
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"Me descanso" does actually exist in spoken Spanish. The native speaker sitting next to me tells me folks in the Chilean countryside have been heard to say it, for example. But we're talking about people with relatively weak formal education, so the real world example doesn't get us to the heart of the grammatical question.

"To rest" in English is an intransitive verb, and the reflexives that I can think of off the top of my head are all transitive. Intransitives, of course, don't have direct objects and the reflexive verb indicates that the actor and the object are the same.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

adaitsman, a Lingot for your kind effort to educate : ) guess I'm going to have to give up and learn transitive/intrasitive. thanks very much!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoulderSpanish

Does not "I myself ate the rest of the cheese." put in the emphasis?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
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I looked at http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/133814/comer-vs.-comerse for the difference between comer and comerse and, according to that source, the difference is between (I) ate and (I) ate up, so this sentence is saying "I ate up the rest of the cheese," vs "I ate the rest of the cheese."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeccaEdnie

I really wish that a little typo like putting "if" instead of "of" didn't make DL think you didn't know the entire sentence! But really, DL does except quite a few typos....I'm just really sloppy with using my phone keyboard.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rav139847

So no ones gonna talk about the life choices made here? Eating the rest of the cheese? Cmon!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

It's moreish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaliaCat33

Why is this reflexive? Why not say "Yo comí el resto del queso"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristaOcon

A reflexive is supposed to be when the subject and the object are the same. Unless someone is eating themselves, how does this phrase even make sense? How is it supposed to translate to "eat up" or "eat entirely" when it clearly doesn't say that?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaliaCat33

Why is the verb "to eat" reflexive here? Why isn't it just YO COMI EL RESTO DEL QUESO ?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

DL can eat me.!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Para borrarlo marque 7.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

What a stupid comment!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

Glad you enjoyed it.

4 years ago