"Fásannseamrógasaghairdín."

Translation:Shamrocks grow in the garden.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DiarmuidOS

Shamrock grows in the garden is a more natural translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I agree wholeheartedly - but you can't get it past Duo.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obekim
obekim
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Real rocks seem to grow in mine!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatConn
MatConn
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i don't believe shamrocks as the proper plural of shamrock! As far as i am aware shamrock is the correct term

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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In US English, “shamrock” is the mass plural, and “shamrocks” is the countable plural; I don’t know if that’s the same in other English dialects.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I think you have your answer... Hackles are rising all over the non-American world. Ah, well - no surprise there...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The OED gives non-US English examples of the countable plural “shamrocks” (in various spellings), but all of their examples are old; this might be akin to “gotten”, where an older form has been preserved in US English and jettisoned in other dialects.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleDennis

Maybe where you live...but I have never heard that! "Shamrock" has always been the plural in every use I ever encountered, including two years in Ireland....

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMid2

I agree with the comment below

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dionysius7
Dionysius7
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I wrote shamrock. Surely that is the plural like sheep or fish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinguDemo
LinguDemo
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The voice sounds quite sweet here. c:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I've never heard shamrock in the plural. I would always choose the mass-noun shamrock for the green stuff growing in a field. Even for the stuff growing out of your lapel, I would choose "bunches of shamrock" as opposed to shamrocks. It might be a UK thing, because I see that the US appears to favour "shamrocks" in the latter context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatConn
MatConn
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I would think that there is no singular and that shamrock is a plural noun. Anytime I have ever seen shamrock, it is referred to as shamrock and is in fact a bunch.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The OED gives “a four-leaved shamrock” as a singular example in UK English (from 1901, its most recent “shamrock” example of any sort).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TArdy44
TArdy44
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"shamrocks" implies that several different TYPES OF SHAMROCK grow in the garden!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlaith7

shamrock is like sheep with regard to a plural

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macliam2
macliam2Plus
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Rithim aisteach

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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Is "clover grows in the garden" an acceptable translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No — “clover” is the translation of seamair. (Seamróg is most likely a diminutive of seamair in origin.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seosamh806006

Correct translation should be "shamrock grows in the garden"

1 year ago
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