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https://www.duolingo.com/Kudog

Romantic Language Similarities... En Español tambien ;)

Kudog
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So, I've been learning Spanish for about 3 years now, and I want to know how similar Spanish is to other romantic languages like Portuguese/Italian, etc. I've noticed that I have been able to understand Portuguese writing pretty well, and I'm wondering if that makes Portuguese with learning, (in addition to other similar languages) Can somebody kind of help me, "define", how similar the romantic languages are?

Entonces, hace tres años que aprendo español, y quiero saber como similar son español y otras lenguas como portugués/italiano, etc. He notado que he sido capaz de entender escritura portugués muy bien, y me pregunto si portugués vale aprender, (adicionalmente a otras lenguas similares) ¿Alguien puede ayudarme "definer", como similar las lenguas románticas son?

¡Además, si mi español es malo, por favor corregirme!

Gracias :)

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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It's the closest to Portuguese, yes, though Portuguese sounds quite different when spoken. It's very easy to learn to read and write Portuguese, so I would say it's definitely worth learning at least enough to get by, but actually learning to speak it would be a larger task.

French is probably the most different, as far as the western languages go. I know nothing about Romanian. It sounds very different, conjugates fairly differently, and has different grammar sometimes. A lot of English vocabulary actually comes from French, though, so between Spanish and English, you would definitely have an advantage.

Italian sits somewhere between Spanish and French. The vocabulary kind of goes back and forth between the two, and the grammar does too. I've noticed that conjugations usually look more Spanish, but there are definitely grammatical concepts going on that are very similar to French. Catalan also sits somewhere between the two, though I know less about its grammar than I do about the others.

Relying upon similarities between the languages to learn multiple ones can be a bit of a trap, though. When reading, I can cheat to Portuguese from Spanish pretty effectively and to Italian and Catalan from French and Spanish, but if you want to actually learn to speak them, you will need to treat them as their own language and give them proper consideration. If you just want to be able to read in as many languages as possible, though, it's definitely worth the effort.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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As a Spanish speaker I totally agree with you. You can understand at least some words and sometimes the context in basic-intermediate Portuguese speeches, and the only problem with written Portuguese is the amount of false friends.

In French you can catch a few words, although written French could be easy enough to catch the context. Romanian is pretty different (they have some slavic influence and we some arabic...) I've heard they can understand Italian and French pretty well.

And Catalan is a bit funny (I'm Colombian, so I don't hear it too often) you can understand a lot of words but with another words you have no idea... it's like: "you akldñjfañ and don't alñdkjñaoi, because alkdjflri"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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My favorite thing about Catalan is that the verb "anar" (ir) is used to make a past tense instead of future tense. I might have panicked slightly when I found that out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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wow that's a bit mind-blowing, once I watched a Catalan movie (Los niños salvajes, Els nens salvatges) and the cast could switch languages so easily, I was so impressed, I wish to do that. I can't figure out how can bilingual people remember things like those (anar for past, ir for future)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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Italian is a good bit closer to French than to Spanish. Here are a few examples:

The pronunciation fools you. Spanish uses a special word (not the usual word for "to have") plus past participle to form the perfect tenses, and the participle (for this purpose) is always masculine. French and Italian use a mix of the regular word for "to have" and "to be" and in the "to have" case, the participle has to agree with the direct object (sometimes) while in the "to be" case, it agrees with the subject.

Spanish uses the present perfect much as English does. French and Italian use the present perfect the way we use the simple past. They both have tenses that correspond to the Spanish preterite, but they tend to use them only in books.

All three languages have clitics, but French and Italian have two extra ones, which correspond to "some of something" and "somewhere". (Actually they replace prepositional phrases).

Spanish has a few words with built-in prepositions, but French and Italian have a slew of them, mostly using the same two prepositions that generate the clitics I mentioned in the last paragraph.

As a student of all three languages, I keep a file with a list of words that don't have the same gender in all three languages or that have some other odd behavior. Over and over, Spanish is the odd man out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thenoblesunfish
thenoblesunfish
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This is an interesting chart which seems to match up with many of the other observations here (for instance, that Italian is in some sense closer to French than Spanish, even though most people might guess the opposite because of the sounds of the languages) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexical_similarity#Indo-European_languages

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katiuska.pino

"hace tres años que aprendo español, y quiero saber CUAN similar ES EL español CON otras lenguas como portugués/italiano, etc. He notado que he sido capaz de entender LA escritura DEL portugués muy bien, y me pregunto si VALE LA PENA APRENDER portugués U otras lenguas similares¿Alguien puede ayudarme A "DEFINIR", CUAN SIMILARES SON las lenguas ROMANCES?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katiuska.pino

As for your question, I agree with Ilmarien. I speak Spanish and although I could understand a few words of French, the Portuguese, etc. It could not communicate with them. If you want to learn one of these languages you will have to spend as much time as any other.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kudog
Kudog
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Thank you for the corrections :D

I find myself being able to speak in basic sentences, and my grammar seems to be lacking. It helps to get some critique :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katiuska.pino

The Spanish has many things confusing, but with a little practice you will not have problems soon :)

I'm learning English and the pronunciation is what it costs me more work, but I was watching some rules of phonetics and I think that I understood a little more . but words like "walked and worked" confuse me yet. :/

I still have much to learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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I'm going to read the comments to see if there's anything I want to say that has not already been said, but Spanish, French, Italian, etc., are Romance languages, not romantic languages. (You may find them very romantic, but that's not the language type.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I'm not a native Spanish speaker and I can bear witness that Portuguese is kind of easy if you know Spanish. I've had some success chatting (via txt) online with a Portuguese speaker that is vaguely familiar with Spanish. He doesn't speak English at all. Just like llmarien stated, speaking is a different ball game.

If you want to define how similar Spanish is to French, Portuguese, or Italian you may want to explore or research how many cognates they share. At least you will have a definitive number to consider.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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And that's only one measure of similarity. (It's a reasonable one, but not the only one.) So when you look at how two languages are similar, the first thing to do is to define exactly what you mean by "similarity" in this case.

3 years ago