"She has not wanted to sleep."

Translation:Ella no ha querido dormir.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/espeekespanish

why not "ella no ha querido A dormir"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

That is not the way they do it. Learning what prepositions go. and do not go, after what verbs is a long process.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espeekespanish

A couple weeks later.... I get it now. It's actually very simple to explain: dormir.... "to sleep" already has "to" built into it so the sentence translates literally quite nicely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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Yes, but it's not quite that simple. "Ir a dormir" requires "a" even though dormir is in the infinitive. Every verb has it's on rules like rspreng said.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

I agree prepositions are a lot to learn. However, I think the comment Maury made is accurate and a way of thinking about whether to use the "a" or not in some instances. I made the same mistake espeedespanish did.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runningtaters

Honestly, I accept that I will never learn when or when not to use 'a' from Duolingo. I'm okay with it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bertbosman

And I do not understand why you can not use 'de' here. "Ella no ha querido de dormir?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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That would be a different sentence entirely and a weird one. De is a preposition of position, ownership, or relationship, and you see this construction with things like sleepwear (ropa de dormir) and sleeping bags (sacos de dormir), or ordering actions (antes de dormir), or as a descriptive addition to an action (hablamos de dormir). I suppose even you could argue for a "from sleep" construction like estoy despertando del sueño, but that would need to be sueño not dormir. However, what you have here is none of these cases.

As a translation, the closest I can get is "She has not sleep wanting" or possibly "She has not wanting of sleep". Basically it is nonsense, but you have piqued my curiosity. What is it that you think the de would be doing there that it is needed?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/querido

"She does not have a sleeping darling."?

Were you trying to say: "She has not wanted of sleeping?", but that does not work.

If you wanted to say "She does not have a want of sleep" that would be expressed differently, "Ella no tiene una falta de sueño."

http://context.reverso.net/translation/spanish-english/Ella+no+ha+querido+de+dormir

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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A. You replied to the wrong person

B. If you are going to make fun of someone, make certain that you get your own translations right. Relying on a translation engine will lead you wrong. Haber /=/ Tener. Also, everyone makes mistakes, some in spelling, others in answering to the wrong person with an inaccurate answer.

C. Your comment is not very helpful since all bertbosman wanted to know was if they needed a preposition. The answer is no, but you went somewhere very weird and unhelpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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A. I was talking to both of you, to get your input as well, but yes, I could have still addressed it better above directly. Anything underneath yours would go to you and bertbosman.

B. I never make fun of anyone. I know that haber does not equal tener; however, depending on the meaning that was being looked for one or the other would be used.

C. I do not assume to know what someone is looking for. You yourself were wondering what was the meaning intended behind using the preposition.

Are you then saying that "Ella no tiene una falta de sueño." is incorrect? It is incorrect for this sentence in Duolingo. The question was whether it was close to what bertbosman thought the sentence would mean. Yes, search engines are not perfect, which is exactly why I post where the information came from in the hopes that you could clear this up. I was not clear, my apologies. As you are from Peru, I defer to your wisdom. How would you say "She has a lack of sleep." which we can also say in English as "She has a want of sleep."?

The first sentence was an example of "What if "querido" was misinterpreted as a noun?" This is not a matter of making fun of someone, but a quest into whether something would make sense or not. Your answer clearly is that it would not make sense, I believe. Don't hesitate to correct me when I am wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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My apologies for misunderstanding your meaning. With this second comment I can see what you were intending much more clearly.

My initial reaction to your comment was that this is exactly the kind of mistake only a machine would make because it takes too many misunderstandings that rely upon reading the sentence in pieces rather than as a whole. People read entire sentences to determine meanings of individual words and determine the meanings of unknown or uncertain words in the frame of the phrase. Machines try to make sense of a sentence from the range of possible word translations; essentially the reverse of humans. That is what I meant by unhelpful.

Most of the problem with the translation you gave lies with haber, since here it cannot possibly indicate possession in the sense the machine translation created when it got confused by the addition of the "de". Haber only indicates possession when it is used as a noun and usually refers to one's monetary assets. Because of the conjugation and position ha here must be a auxiliary verb that requires another verb to complete the action. That is why querido must be a participle, not a noun. What the reverso.net translator did was to work the sentence as pieces. My guess is that it parsed out the phrases, broke out what appears to be a phrase of possession (querido de dormir= "sleeping darling") and then couldn't find another verb for haber to assist and so reversed it to the infinitive root, then decided on a semantics rule that haber must be a noun indicating ownership of the following noun phrase ("have sleeping darling"). Each of these steps makes sense individually, but it is not an error a human would make since this leaves the sentence without a verb. The reverso.net engine fixed that problem by migrating the verb across the English meanings of "have", and in the process changed the meaning of haber to tener and thereby corrupted the entire sentence. You cannot possibly reverse translate that phrase to get the original.

That is why your comment appeared frivolous without your second comment. Again I apologize since that was not your intent.

As to how one would say "lack of sleep": what you have is how you would say it, but I can't think of an example where that phrasing would be used to mean that someone is sleepy in the way that you suggest was what the reason for the addition of the de. Most often it appears as a diagnostic or descriptive phrase; "La noche anterior no estábamos seguras de ir. La semana había sido dura y tenía una falta de sueño considerable. In any event it is an unlikely meaning for someone to try to get to from the lesson phrase, and "Ella no tiene una falta de sueño" really sounds like someone saying that she does not display the primary symptom of insomnia.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SameerSiru
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeDrinkwater

In another example "Ellos no han ido de ir" = "They have not had to go" used the preposition "de" before the infinitive IR. In our example here can someone please explain why the preposition "de" is allowed with IR but is not allowed with "ella no ha querido dormir"

Muchos Gracias!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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The Spanish sentence you gave does not translate to the English you gave. I cannot make sense of it. I believe you might have meant "Ellos no han tenido que ir." where "tenido que" translates to "had to" and for "tener" to take on that meaning it must be followed by "que".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankCerny

I entered the correct answer once and it didn't like it. I copied and pasted the correct answer and it said it was incorrect. I can't finish the session because of this. This is the second time this has happened. Any suggestions for a work around?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankCerny

Sorry - it even said the copied and pasted answer was incorrect.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It seems like your internet went out briefly while doing this. Duo gets pretty confused when that happens.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeWebb1

This is correct

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevinReece

Can't I just say "No ha querido dormir" if you already knew who i was talking about?

7 months ago
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