"bianagcat"

Translation:The cats' food

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hierony
Hierony
  • 11
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

The cat's food or the cats' food?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

the plural one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Searlasmane

But the plural one should have an apostrophe after the s. Reported this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverPill

Actually, no. According to nonsensical English grammar rules, only peoples names have apostrophes before the s

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I'm sorry you took that to be combative; I certainly didn't mean for it to be! I'm a copy editor, and this is the sort of thing I am paid to correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I'm not sure whether you mean exactly what you wrote, because what you wrote is certainly incorrect. Singular nouns that do not end in 's' absolutely do take an apostrophe before the 's' that marks possession.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Searlasmane

No, you're making an absent-minded mistake,SilverPill. For instance, what you wrote should be people's names (with the word people taking an apostrophe before the s that makes it a possessive. This is because the apostrophe (in the singular) takes the place of the word his, so that the original phrase long ago would have been "The cat his food". Here's a nice short guide to how to do it: http://www.ef-ireland.ie/english-resources/english-grammar/forming-possessive/ (The only exception to the apostrophe rule is possessive pronouns, which, just to be cussed, don't have apostrophes! So you have **Is that the cat's milk? Yes, it's its milk!" (the first "it's" being short for "it is" and the second "its" being the possessive pronoun referring to the cat).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Searlasmane

Eh? I was trying to be helpful, not at all to be combative! I'm very sorry if you took it that way.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverPill

I can't tell who out of the two of you are the most combative, but I don't wish to speak with either of you. It's not my fault English is inconsistent and stupid at times. One thing it has going for it over Irish is that you'd have to be pretty thick to not see which word in a sentence is the possessive. If we can make up rules for English at a whim, why not just chuck out the possessive apostrophe altogether. Now I'm done with you lot. Well done souring civil discourse.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim862107

Try the food of the cats

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJConway1

I tried it last year and it didn't work. (see below)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

"cat" is of the first declension

http://www.nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/nouns.php?teanga=

confirmed by the dictionary, which also shows its male...

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/gram/cat

rules for first declension are here

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm

so far, "cat" nom. sing. has modified to "cat" gen. plural. Now final rule: all genitives plurals get eclipsed when you prefix with "na"

2.1   When do we eclipse nouns?

Collins Dictionaries (2011-07-28). Easy Learning Irish Grammar (Collins Easy Learning Irish) (Irish Edition) (Kindle Location 404). HarperCollins Publishers. Kindle Edition.

  • 5 groups of eventualities
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1601

A noun’s gender is described as masculine rather than male.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/werdnarehsu
werdnarehsu
  • 18
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Is "bia na chait" a valid phrase? (the cat's food) I was given the choice from cait/chait/gcat, with no english for context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
  • 23
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6

No, it is not The easiest way would be to look it up.

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/gram/cat

(If would want to deduct it from a set of rules, then you would have to start knowing the gender and then to go further from that. Event declension was not easy to figure out with the shown rules ...)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeromeAustin

Thanks for the link. I'm upvoting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/werdnarehsu
werdnarehsu
  • 18
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Thanks. I gather "na" is genitive singular only for feminine nouns; as "cat" is masculine what I suggested doesn't work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brazenakane

fix this!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1601

Fix what?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emile110
Emile110
  • 20
  • 20
  • 20
  • 19
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5

Maybe the best way to understand the use of cases, is not to think in English, but try to look further to the big tree of Indo-european languages, with originally eight cases. In the monstruous sentence Look Brian, Pol gives the cat the food from the fridge with the help of his sister's spoon in his house in Waterford. All these parts of the sentence are in Sanskrit or Russian in different cases. All these cases have a function in the sentence and they were discernible in word endings. And they still are explicit in many other languages, but hardley in English. Brian is the Vocative or the Direct adress of the sentence. Pol is the subject, in the nominative case. The food is the direct object, in the accusative case. The cat is the one whoM (mmm, English case ending) the food is given to, the indirect object, in the dative case. From the fridge states the source or ground, the ablative case, in some languages the prepositional case. With the help of indicates the instrumental case. His sister's spoon indicates belonging or possession, the genitive case. In his house in Watford gives the location, the locative case. Then imagine you actually hear this different case endings yourself in real life. I left the allative case out (the direction or towards case). To hell! , or the more neutral downhill is a good example for that case.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkMooney2

Is the above translation also the way to say catfood?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJConway1

Food of the cats ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1601

The food of the cats.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katastrophe423

Should it be capitalized like all the other ones?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Strictly speaking, no, since it's not a sentence. Then again, many of the other phrases to be translated aren't actual sentences either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kraden04

Shouldn't it be "cat's" not "cats"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

No, na gcat is plural and genitive. If it were the food of one cat, it would be bia an chait.

If you're wondering about the position of the apostrophe, it goes after the pluralizing "s" in the case of a plural possessive. "The cat's food" means "the food of one cat", whereas "the cats' food" is "the food of at least two cats."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kraden04

I see, GRMA

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
  • 21
  • 15
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 15

I have no idea where any of these apostrophes go. I am totally guessing. I think when I actually first went through this lesson, I had some understanding of it....apparently not any more, lol.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Basically, if the noun is plural the apostrophe goes after the s. That's all there is to it. Same as with singular nouns that end in s.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
  • 21
  • 15
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 15

Yeah, I understand how it works in English but I just don't know which one of the Irish ones are plural, they all look plural and I don't know which is which.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
  • 23
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

One rule of thumb that usually helps me is that eclipse usually happens in the plural (like here), while singular nouns are more often lenited. That is not nearly a rule, but probably close to 2/3 of the time.

I definitely agree that it is confusing that cat can mean both "a cat" and "of cats."

2 years ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.