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  5. "Jag pratade med läkarna i fö…

"Jag pratade med läkarna i förrgår."

Translation:I spoke to the doctors the day before yesterday.

March 5, 2015

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

For those grammar nerds out there, "I spoke with the doctors ereyesterday" is technically correct, but obsolete. Similarly with "overmorrow" for the day after tomorrow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

I haven’t heard those since days of yore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas407435

Verily, art thou a traveller through time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWal211702

My dad still says 'ereyesterday'. So not completely obsolete. Yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWal211702

I feel like it's my duty to not let it die out :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrLeopold

In Dutch, we say "eergisteren" and "overmorgen"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhlouise

How would you pronounce "ereyesterday"? Seems a bit tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

Ereyesterday is simply two words joined together. The word ere is pronounced like the first syllable in error, though how strongly the r is pronounced is dialectical. You'll get it erelong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B.Weber1

I'm going to start using both!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/who.is.artis

Why would English lose those words?? they're so useful. I hate having to say "the ... before/after ...", I'm so used to being able to say it in a shorter and simpler way in Latvian, my first language. "aizvakar" - day before yesterday, "parīt" - day after tomorrow. We even have "aizparīt" - the day after the day after tomorrow. Imagine saying that in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pastamancer

I'm glad that my native language has one word for 'i förrgår' and it's "przedwczoraj". You English speaking fellas should consider resurrecting "ereyesterday" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bookbeast

I didn't try it, but with the phrase "i förrgår" would "two days ago" also work as a translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Casinote

It should. I would usually say "two days ago" rather than "the day before yesterday"; I suspect that's probably a regional preference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianeLehma

Would "I spoke to the doctors the day before" be an acceptable translation? Is it necessary to include the yesterday?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pocketmoose

To me at least "the day before" would mean yesterday, not the day before that, which is meant here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tricia888303

To me (American speaker), "before" wants an object, for example: "I spoke to the doctors the day before the rash appeared."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NordicWay

So.. can we say something like this ''förrförrgår'' for the day before the day before yesterday? :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

You can't find the word in a Swedish dictionary, but everybody would understand it of course. Proper Swedish is "för två dagar sen" or e.g. "i söndags" if it is Tuesday today.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NordicWay

åh i see its is like a prepreprepre- type of prefix , tack så mycket!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Gastons_

I talked with doctor the day before yesterday. Would this count as correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

No. It needs to be "the doctors" not "doctor".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PercyBeal

Why is a change of word order in English not accepted? The day before yesterday I spoke to the doctors seems perfectly reasonable but is rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaStorli

I would never dream of using "pratade" if I was speaking to the doctors about medical issues. Then it would be "talade". "Jag pratade" stands for "I was having a chat", as if I had them for tea or something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

That's what I thought. I wrote "I chatted with the doctors . . . " but it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaStorli

It should have been, since it is the most adequate translation of "pratade".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

"the other day" is the most common way of referring to the day before yesterday in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

To me that means a recent day, not necessarily two days ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

To me it's nearly always two days ago. I'd use a number to express any number of days before that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

The other day = "häromdagen" in Swedish :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

To many English people, the other day means the same as the day before yesterday though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

For me, the other day is not specific. I'd use it when the number of days is not important or I can't remember exactly, though I know it was before yesterday. It might be any time before yesterday but usually less than a week..

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