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  5. "Mein Bein!"

"Mein Bein!"

Translation:My leg!

August 23, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pewpy

I wonder if this was inspired by Spongebob


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lunaris13

I even heard it like in Spongebob XD made me laugh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcfabbin

I'm happy I'm not the only person who thought of Spongebob :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpoore1

which episode are you alluding to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/porquepuedo

About... all of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tchapman89

Okay, now I just need to know how to say, "Rev up those fryers, cause I am sure hungry for one-"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dubem8

This is from the audio of the German dub of that episode: "Dreht die Herdplatten hoch, weil ich hab richtig Hunger auf einen..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

Does this always mean 'leg' and never anything else. In German, the collar bone is 'das Schlüsselbein', so in this case it's bone? Very strange...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InfiniteEnigma

You're right! My german dictionary confirms that "(das) Bein" is an alternative translation for "(der) Knochen", which is "bone".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtistryHM

The section tips has some information on this if you're still interested four years later lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sebool112

Even if not, it'll be useful for those who read discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pietvo

Someone is running away with his leg and now he needs a new leg.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bob690

"Bein" is neuter, "mein" is used here as a possessive pronoun so why wouldn't it be "Meins Bein" (other than the fact that it sounds weird)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

All your answers are here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bob690

Yes, thank you. I am aware of the charts that you referenced. The ending for nominative neuter possessive pronouns is "s", hence I posed "Meins" as the correct translation. What am I doing wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

It is dependent on a noun. That's the upper chart. Mein Tisch; mein Haus; meine Schuh. Then you have independents on the other side. Der Tisch ist miener; das Haus ist meins; die Schuh ist meine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bob690

Thanks again. Would you believe that I have carefully and painstakingly (so that I would not possibly make an error) looked at the wrong damn chart about six different times!


[deactivated user]

    I know, it's four years too late but maybe someone will find this helpful

    Meins is not a correct grammatical form. It's more used to say 'Meins!' meaning 'That's mine!'

    So, the nominative case pronoun for all genders would be:

    Mein (Hund m.), Meine (Katze f.), Mein (Haus n.)

    Meine (Hunde m. pl.), Meine (Katzen f. pl), Meine (Häuser n. pl.) Since plural forms always get the pronoun 'die' it's the same as the feminine plural form.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atree

    A bit of a tongue twister. Try saying it several times quickly. Very quickly get to "mein mein mein mein"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockleegustavo

    Is "my bone" wrong? I mean, it can be weird, but I think it's right.


    [deactivated user]

      no, as "bone" is "knochen"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockleegustavo

      So why does Duolingo translate it as "bone" when you hover "Bein"? It is quite confusing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germanwannabee

      you might want to report it


      [deactivated user]

        [deactivated user]

          Bein is an old word for bone, it's not used anymore. The more common word for bone is (der) Knochen.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah851648

          You're right, but it's still there in many words that describe specific bones: "Jochbein", "Nasenbein", "Steißbein" etc.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

          Könnte es "my bone" sein?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

          Not in everyday conversations. "Bein" has been used centuries ago for "bone" but not anymore.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henchook

          Is "My leg!" and idiom, as in the English "My foot!" meaning negation or disbelief?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

          No, it isn't.

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