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"Níl na sciortaí romhainn."

Translation:The skirts are not in front of us.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ccassidy9

I had there are no skirts before us and was marked wrong. I'm having trouble understanding why

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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I suppose DL want a more exact translation. Your sentence would be Níl aon sciortaí romhainn.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CobaltOakTree
CobaltOakTree
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The pronunciation of romhainn: it seems the "mh" is mute; but in other words, sometimes it seems like a "w" and some times like a "v". Assuming the speaker is doing it right, what are the rules regarding the pronunciation of "mh"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vit246081

Asking the same question, but it seems in some cases they are mute, in others they are not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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A good explanation of the sounds in Irish are given in chapter one of Graiméar Gaeilge na mBráithre Críostaí
The sound of mh varies depending on whether:

  • it affects the preceding vowel
  • it combines with the preceding vowel to form a diphthong
  • it is sounded as a consonant

Affecting the preceding vowel:
Sometimes in the combination omh or omha the effect of mh is to lengthen the vowel 'o' making the whole combination sound like ó. Examples are: chomh, comharsa, comhla, romham, tomhas, comhairle, romhainn, thomhais.
Similarly with the combination umh or umha. Examples are : ciumhais, cumhacht, cumhra, Mumhain, umhal. These sound like ciúis, cúcht, cúra, Múin, úl respectively.

Combining with the preceding vowel:
In a multi-syllable word but not ending in mh, if mh or mha is preceded by the vowel 'a' it combines with it to form an 'au' sound. Examples are: amhras, gamhain, macasamhail, ramhar, cleamhnas, sleamhain, Teamhair, namhaid. This is where you get the impression that mh sounds a bit like a 'w'.

Sounded as a consonant:
Here mh has a 'v' sound. Examples are: neamh, talamh, gaineamh, amh, grámhar, amháin, nimh, ríomh, riamh, mheáigh, deimhin, naimhde.

Also it varies with dialect. For example, where I grew up mh in grámhar and amháin was sounded like a 'w'. In deimhin and naimhde the mh was silent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vit246081

In the case it affects the preceding vowel, it is mute and the vowel is lengthened?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Yes. This only applies to the vowels 'o' and 'u'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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I don't think it applies to 'bh'.
'bh', 'dh' and 'gh' are covered in chapter 1 of the link I posted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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I have to back up a level to reply to your question about 'bh'.
bh combines with the preceding vowel 'a' in the same way as 'mh' to form an 'au' sound. Examples are: cabhair, fabhra, gabhar, labhair, leabhar, Cabhán, cabhlach, fabhair, tabhair, abhaill, creabhair, meabhair.
Similarly bh combines with the vowel 'o' to form an 'ou' sound, for example cobhsaí, tobhach.

bh sounded as a consonant has a 'v' sound like mh. Examples are: bhain, bhrúigh, tarbh, brobh, ubh, scríobh, bhí, luibh, deilbh.

In the word faobhar only the 'ao' sound is made; the bh is silent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vit246081

GRMA. Does this apply to "bh" as well?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vit246081

Is as Gaeilge é. Ní tughim é.

2 years ago