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  5. "Jag vinner, du förlorar."

"Jag vinner, du förlorar."

Translation:I win, you lose.

March 7, 2015

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SwiftySlasher

That sounds like a pretty rude thing to say to someone, especially in Sweden...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's the kind of thing children say sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unfetteredferret

Hahaha du förlorar, SwiftySlasher! <points finger>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awatson4123

Skrattar du, förlorar du


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben391264

Manneeeeeeeeeeeen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin581205

Skrattade du eller förlorade du?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Jon-Snow-

Serious question about this nice reference, why are the words in this word order? It would be short for "Om du skrattar, du förlorar" I guess. Come to think of it, you can say it like that in german as well (Lachst Du, verlierst Du), but I'm still wondering about a grammatical explanation for it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

När spelar du spelet av troner, du vinner eller du dör :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas407435

Utsädet är stark.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Just a tip. "Utsäde" means the seeds stored for planting the next season. ;) You're looking for "säden".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

"När du spelar tronernas spel vinner du, eller så dör du." would be a more correct Swedish translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

Reminds me of the childhood phrase in England, "I win, you lose, you get a big bruise", followed by a swift punch in the arm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betelgeuse321

We did that after Tic Tac Toe (Hand game) But we have "... Know you get a big bruise" so its very similar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidsDuolingo

Skrattar du, förlorar du!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZaListios

Skratter du förlorar du


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwonnnn

Is förlorar etymologically related to "forlorn" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dirckk

It would seem so, according to Wiktionary. The word survives in English only in its past-participle form: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/forlese#English ; https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/förlora#Swedish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoKyung4

Seems plausible there is a common germanic root there, given the German "verlieren" and Dutch "verliezen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingoLaura

in addition to the "forlorn" etymology, I can remember forlorar because "llorar" in Spanish means cry. och nar jag forlorar, jag gratar (bara ibland)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

*när jag förlorar gråter jag


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oscarjgray

Sounds like a direct quote from a Trump speech


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

Can förlora also be used for misplacing things or would tappa be preferred there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Yes, but "tappa bort" is often preferred for misplacing things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

tack så mycket


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabdan3

This made me think of "Skrattar du, förlorar du"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SagiEzov

Is think that "ferloren" in German is "lost" so thats got to be a cognate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

According to Wiktionary, förlora is what you might call a cognate loan. It comes from the past participle of Middle Low German “vorlēzen”, cognate to Middle High German “verliesen”, which yielded modern Standard German “verlieren” (past participle “verloren”). The Modern Low German reflex is “verlesen/verleren” (although it has been replaced by different words for some dialects of Low German).

(Low German is a Western Germanic language spoken in the northern parts of Germany and north-eastern Netherlands. It is increasingly dialectised but originally it’s a different language which is more closely related to Dutch than to High German.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steph927304

Makes me think about "Heads I win, tails you lose, ok?" ("krona jag vinner, klave du förlorar"?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Your translation is correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon266097

The winner does take it all. You have to remember


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahbeetay5

So if it's "Skrattar du förlorar du" , How come this is not: Vinner jag, förlorar du ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

“Skrattar du, (så) förlorar du” is a different type of sentence I’m afraid. Here the inversion in the first clause is used to indicate a conditional (basically an if-clause): “If you laugh, you lose.” You can do this in English, too, albeit only with auxiliaries: “Had he gone to the party, he would have met Sarah.” So “vinner jag, (så) förlorar du” is a valid sentence, it just means something different: “If I win, you lose” rather than “I win, you lose”.

In or


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian_bush

In English it is spelt with double o. Please correct your incorrect spelling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

“Loose” is the adjective meaning “not firmly fixed in place”. The verb “to misplace/to not win” is spelled “to lose” with one o.

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