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"El barrio"

Translation:The neighborhood

5 years ago

97 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dleehii

I got it wrong because I was too lazy to type "neighborhood" and just wrote "the hood" lol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/okidd

I almost did this but i figured it would be marked wrong. Thank you for testing it for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeiraRegal

The hood does not have anything to do with the neighborhood

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertasmi12

That is the answer it gave for me "hood". I am Chicago and the hood for us does not mean a nice neighborhood.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In the US barrio has become the word for the poor latino areas. I assume that is because these neighborhoods have many predominantly Spanish speaking residents and that is how they referred to their neighborhood. In most of the rest of Latin America, barrio just means district or neighborhood. The negative connotations of the word are a product of the social and economic tensions in tensions between ethnic groups in the US.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordanAdams012

Lol Dleehii I did the same and got it wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DNBKR
DNBKR
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This is exactly what i just did

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteampunkRaccoon
SteampunkRaccoon
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Yo hice el mismo, pero no funciona

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattGoldman93

same lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonCurry

I do NOT have a typo in my answer! There is a 'u' in Neighbourhood - on this side of the Atlantic at least! LOL.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conisbrough

In my dictionary,under "district" it givesb both neighbourhood and barrio.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonywgtn

What about suburb?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

antony- it would be afueras

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xgunner123x

...or suburbio???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Here in Tucson we have historic barrios and neighborhoods, depending on whether they were settled by Anglos or Latinos originally. So barrio is actually an English word here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneePea

In Southern California barrio is also used among English-only speakers, however it is usually used in a derogatory manner.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Let me guess - as something akin to ghetto?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneePea

Unfortunately, yes, that's the most common way that I hear it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alanrudd1951

Distrist as well. Shouldn,t be marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

alanrud- In a district we can have many "barrios". So I think there's a difference between these 2 words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pastafarianist

What a peculiar word. For those who wonder, Wiktionary says it comes from Arabic.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lobzi8

hmm its missing a source on wiki, barri in arabic means by land, e.g. when describing if a transport is barri versus baHri it is by land or sea. I'm a native Arabic/English speaker..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_in_China

@Lobna Interesting. In Indonesian, bahari means " the sea". I guess we have many Arabic loanwords

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WouterC
WouterC
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I suspect that 'quarter' would also be acceptable. For example 'The Latin Quarter' - El barrio Latino.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boot2
boot2
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should be accepted but is not (yet?)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s-partridge
s-partridge
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Es un magnifico día en este barrio.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VioletWals

I am English and used English spelling. It's ridiculous to count it as an error.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I have been similarly wrong on sites using British English. The purpose of having a standard is so what is correct is clear. The standard on Duo is American English. I am surprised that they just didn't count it as a misspelling, though . But many Americans are not aware of many of the spelling variations between American and British English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Violet, after a lot of people report it as "should be accepted," they may include it in future lessons, as they do for "colour." If I were writing for a British paper, I'm quite sure I'd forget & revert to what I'm accustomed to most of the time! ;-)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pop5000
pop5000
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Is the use of barrio to describe a neighborhood given a negative connotation in Spanish speaking countries? I asked a native Venezuelan this and she said that typically the term barrio would be used to describe a poor or rundown neighborhood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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This may depend upon regional differences. The way my Peruvian teacher taught the vocabulary, the word had no pejorative associated with it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoNoHablaEspanol

Is the "B" SUPPOSED to sound like a "V"?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faux3
Faux3
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Yup, except here, when you click on barrio by itself, in which she says "barrio" as in English... Maybe there's a rule or exception?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/normatthew

Barrio has such a negative connotation (in the US at least). Is there a word for neighborhood that I could use that doesn't carry such bilingual weight?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fteisot
fteisot
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a city is divided in distritos. Each distrito is divided in barrios. There isn't a negative connotation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GwumpiKat

So... What about vecindario?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

Vecindario is the name of a thriving, non-tourist town near the south-east coast of Gran Canaria. It's about halfway between the airport and Playa del Inglés, where I live. Thank you Duolingo for the tremendous help you have given me in learning Spanish - and it just happens that the version taught here is very close the the Gran Canarian variant. It even accepts «guagua» for bus! A fantastic resource.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That should be accepted I think. Barrio is pretty exclusive in my experience but that is rather limited and these things are quite regional.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kristidraper

Here in Mexico Mormon local congregations are called "barrios" and represent a geographical area, similar to a school or voting district in the States. In the English-speaking world they are called "wards".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dipish

"area" should work too

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

dipish- An area can be another thing than "barrio". It can be a region, and a region can content many "barrios". It can be a simple space or flat surface.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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area = la zona

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/floralys152

Currently listening to: el barrio- tiempo del suéter

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieSumpfHexe

i know barrio is (can be) a ghetto. maybe used as a slang, but a person told me long time ago when i stumbled across a song called Barrio it meant ghetto. Spanish native he was. So yeah....i don't know what to think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie864625

Barrio is what I thought it should be but this guy drops some of the ending sounds when he speaks. Can he speak more clearly? By the way, I really do appreciated this free program! It has helped me learn a lot!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHooks0

In England we would say district rather than neighbourhood

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In American English businesses have districts and residential areas have neighborhoods. Of course we do speak of restaurants and other retail business being in the neighborhood. But when similar businesses are grouped together it generally becomes a district like the financial district, the garment district or even the red light district. I think Barrio can be used for both, but I am unclear whether there is a difference between barrio and vecindad. Vecino is the word for neighbor, but I think Barrio is a little more common. I know that neighborhood (or should I say neighbourhood) is sometimes used. Does it have any different meaning? I can't believe the British hip hop generation doesn't talk about the hood.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/legendarynarwhal

Carnaval del barrio...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/torakosama

I thought "barrio" had a strictly negative connotation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think the negative connotations are mostly from the US not from Spanish. Americans have imade it mean something like Hispanic Ghetto. In Spanish it means district or neighborhood.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

I was messing around, and intentionally wrote "the hood".
DL accepted. lol (the "brothers" would be proud) : )

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learner918273645

*ghetto is how it's most commonly used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chriswbaby

That's a colloquialism in English from Southern California and not how the word is used in Spanish speaking countries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuponsaver

It's also from NYC. And it's derrogatory there too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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But among Spanish speakers it can simply means neighborhood. This is what my Peruvian teacher taught us.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna57
anna57
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That is not the whole truth. In Venezuela, which is a Spanish speaking country, they use "barrio" for their slums and not for all kind of neighborhoods. I don't know about the other South American countries. But at least in this specific case there is a similarity to the use of the word as "ghetto" in the USA.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ullaweide

I was just upset to get the spelling wrong, had to translate from English and put: bario (missed an r). Normally, that would just get me an: " You've got a spelling error". I don't understand why!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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There is a word spelled with only one /r/, "bario", which means "barium." DL will only count something as a typo if you miss a letter and the misspelled word doesn't exist; otherwise, it marks it as a mistake.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Catherine, good explanation. I'm impressed with the levels you have attained in six languages! Some people put six or more by their screen names, when they are at level ONE in all but one of them!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Thanks. I started off just kind of blasting through some of the languages I had studied previously but realized it's better to go slow and steady, especially with a new language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaTrask

I thought it was area to be honest

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boot2
boot2
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In Barcelona you find the Barrio Gotico which is the old area, part of the old town

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnniMadsen

I spelled it neighbourhood and now it's correct

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emanulito

Isnt el Barrio like a village also.?. In the phillipines barrio means a villlage

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No, or at least I have never heard that here. Barrio is neighborhood, district or quarter (as in Latin Quarter) In most American cities it is pretty much the Latino equivalent to the Hood.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mailboosters

What is wrong with 'district'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is not wrong,although neighborhood is probably the more common meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeets

I wonder if this is related to the term borough. As in a sub-section of a city, or a district. Even if they are unrelated, it will help me to remember what 'barrio' means.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That's a good one for a mem like they use on the Memrise app. But it doesn't seem to be related. The roots of borough are from Old English and its Germanic roots prior to the French/Latin influences post 1066.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leillia
Leillia
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Is the "b" pronounced like a "v"? Because it sounds like that in the audio and now I'm not sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S.Aumond
S.Aumond
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Yes: in some dialects, it can be VERY close or even be the exact same sound.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. The b and v sounds are either identical or quite close. I hear a very slight difference with some speakers and none with others, and similarly some teachers have said the same and some have said almost the same. So there may be some regional variation here, or it could be that the more accurately I can predict the word coming, the more I hear it as I see it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mailboosters

What is wrong with 'district'? The Collins Dictionary translates 'barrio chino' into red-light district.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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District should be accepted. That actually is the broader definition. In the US barrio has become synonymous with Latino neighborhood, and I think that has effected it here. As of 2015 the US became the country with the second highest number of Spanish speakers. But I believe even in Mexico barrio is basically district. As for barrio chino, I would leave that one be. Blaming red light districts on the Chinese must have some politically correct push back in the modern age. But that's besides the point.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel.Alicia

Doesn't "el barrio" also mean "the slums"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think that is mostly an American adaptation of the word. I think ghetto is perhaps a better translation because it harks back to the Jewish ghettos in Europe as well as modern American ghettos. Because of the economic divide today ghetto has been equated with slum, but it is the fact that people feel forced to live there for whatever reason because of an ethnic affiliation. So barrio, the Spanish word for district or neighborhood becomes the name of these areas with high Hispanic populations. In San Diego There is an area named Barrio Logan. It is one of the centers of Hispanic culture and pride. I don't think they think of it as a slum.

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sdut-gateway-sign-barrio-logan-2014dec13-story.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inwoodhood

Got it wrong because I put one r instead of two

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Which means you said the barium. Quite different.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/bario

The rr is not a phoneme in English, but it is one in Spanish. Many words vary from each other just by that difference. It takes a while to hear, but it is important.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jes7337

I wrote 'The neighborhood', and it marked me wrong, saying the answer was, unmm... 'The neighborhood' ????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That does happen from time to time. Sometimes it is just a one time error, although it can happen consistently on one exercise. While trying to complete a specific lesson. Unfortunately, if the error is initiated when the lesson begins, it may be impossible to complete that particular lesson without exiting and beginning from scratch. You see quite a few comments about this throughout the comments, it doesn't happen very often at all to any user. Always report using the flag icon, just in case there has been an editing error that crept in. But those errors are generally more obvious. For example there was an error in one exercise where señora was originally translated as woman and when the programmer tried to add lady as an accepted answer, they apparently made a typo in the code and the correct answer became woman lady (or maybe lady woman) . They may have finally fixed the problem though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickShrine

Should have counted

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katka307695

typo in the translation : neighbourhood

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That's the British English spelling. Duo is based on American English so you will see neighborhood, color, labor, jail center, etc. They are beginning to accept British spelling, but what is shown is American spelling.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna444145

Thats what i said and got it wrong too

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathyEarl

Its says the quarter????

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7azaqEl
7azaqEl
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Knew this word because of Disturbed's "Stupify"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes Barrio is used extensively in American English. But you should realize that the American English part puts a particular spin on that word which you won't find in Spanish, although it probably did arise from hearing an area referred to as Él barrio. When used in English it is essentially equivalent to saying the latino hood. But obviously there are many types of neighborhoods, districts and quarters.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryceSpringfield
BryceSpringfield
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Doesn't "barrio" have closer meaning to a Spanish-speaking slum, or do barrio and vecindario mean the same in Spanish, unlike in English?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. The English connection comes from the fact that poor Spanish speaking people in the US referred to their neighbirboods as el barrio. The word became associated with the poor housing conditions that were inescapable for the residents and, by some, a feeling of distaste for the residents. That connotation has no place in Spanish and more educated people in the US tend to use it less to mean that. It is essentially just overt cultural and class bias.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepermman
thepermman
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i put borough

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

I have never used neighbourhood in the UK ... more 'area' of a town, or corner or bit.....

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That's interesting. I was familiar with the spelling difference between the US and the UK, but not a usage difference. In the US neighborhood is pretty much the default word when you are talking about where someone lives. When you talk about a neighborhood you are often talking about a lot more than just geographic proximity, but the way people relate to each other, the proximity to social activities, and the general "vibe". Neighborhoods have personality, areas don't, although business areas with distinct interests or personalities are often districts (the theater district, the fashion district, etc). El barrio does tend to get associated with the idea of a latino ghetto in the US, but it is simply the neighborhood where Latinos, many of whom are relatively poor, create a small oasis of Latin culture to live in.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilie234031

The voice said tape what you hear!, Wich was "The bario" It didn't say translate what you hear! Ilie Bora

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The voice doesn't give the instructions, the box does. And the voice never says the bario, it says el bario

5 months ago