"Den är sönder."

Translation:It is broken.

March 7, 2015

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Way to remember for native English speakers - torn asunder

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Well spotted! They're related. :)

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tabmow92

Or just "sunder" meaning to break, cut

February 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiwiDressager

Came here to say just this!

September 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Motu

Is it different from "trasig"?

April 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

No, not really.

Edit: upon thinking a bit, trasig feels like a more natural choice for complicated and/or man-made things like computers, engines and clothes. Any native who'd agree or disagree with me on this?

April 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaDucki

I think they're basically the same, but I don't hear "sönder" often outside the expression "gå sönder". It sounds a little bit childish to describe something as "sönder" to me.
-Native

October 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crutypus

Can it mean apart?

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

There's some overlap, and isönder is a dialectal word which can mean "apart", but generally the answer is "not really, although we'd understand what you mean."

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crutypus

Thanks, I just saw it before in a sentence where it meant apart, so it had me wondering, but there are obviously a lot of cases where we could use both, even in English.

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agma29

Why is it a den and not a det? What's the difference?

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sand_from_Mars

"den" replaces a -en word, and "det" replaces an -et word: for example: Bordet är sönder = det är sönder. Stolen är sönder = den är sönder.

Edited. Arnauti corrected me, saying that sönder always has the same form:

Stolen är sönder. Bordet är sönder. Tallrikarna är sönder.

March 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agma29

And since it does not talk about a specific object, how should I know which one goes? :O

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sand_from_Mars

If you didn't talk about the object before, you must use "det": det regnar, det snöar, det är en kvinna, det är ett barn, det är en hund, etc.

In the sentence "den är sönder", DEN refers necessarily to an -EN word, that you have spoken about just before. :)

Example: "Varför har du kastat stolen?", "För den var sönder". :)

April 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igulineue

Why isn't "this is broken" a correct solution?

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

While Swedish den/det will in some cases translate as this/that, that is not the case here. In straightforward sentences like this, it's generally a good idea to go for a simple it = den/det.

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igulineue

Tack - and also, tack for answering almost all my questions and doubts :P

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Varsågod!

September 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabzerbinatoEng

Isn't there an expression for broken in which you say things are "paj"?

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, it's somewhere between colloquial and slangy.

May 15, 2016
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