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  5. "As-tu du liquide ?"

"As-tu du liquide ?"

Translation:Do you have some cash?

March 8, 2015

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin861961

What if you were being asked in airport security if you had any liquid? Would that be any different from "As-tu du liquide"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikegermai

Perhaps they are asking for a bribe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yanivps

LOL :))))))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Razzako

Is this a French idiom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

No, liquide is the word for cash.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bamelinlover13

Then what's the French word for Liquid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

Also "liquide". We also use it this way in English (sort of). Cash is referred to as "liquid assets" in financial terms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Sounds slangey, eh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alsweetex

Not really, in English a business has "liquidity" for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShenzyMarr

True even in Arabic one term for money is liquidity


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike62480

Yes, " as-tu du liquide, as-tu des liquidités" (bank langage in france) opposite of buildings, flats and houses, actions in Stock exhange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth261736

Liquide does mean liquid, so it should NOT be marked as incorrect, even if it would be a strange thing to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertcolin

In france if you ask "as tu du liquide" without other précision it is necessary some cash.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

Not in the context of THIS lesson, which is on the ECONOMY. Context, context, context, context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

Yeah, Elizabeth, except the lesson here is about a vocab word that means cash. So use cash if you prefer to learn something new, rather than staying behind with the old meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

Just how many words are there for cash?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Probably as many as in English. I think the most common are espèces, (argent) liquide and the slang terms thune, fric, oseille, blé and flouze.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghaith415370

In iraq we use the same term to express (cash)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagsHarris

in UK, talking about coins as opposed to bank notes, we would say "Have you any change?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shane361067

It's the same in the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chycoose

Yes I would say that, not cash


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

But le liquide refers to both bills (notes) and coins (farthings). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julia_moncton

Well, it didn't sound anything close to "liquide" to me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

The pronunciation of the French word "liquide" is correct in the audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmberJones6

Could you not say 'do you have liquidity? ' ? This would be a phrase used in economics.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

This is everyday language, not an econ thesis.

Do you have cash? Avez-vous du liquide ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraHaley1

I was in French Immersion from Kindergarten until the end of Grade 10 and NEVER did we learn this term. I'm just lucky I got it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike62480

Oui, on peut dire aussi " as-tu des espèces" (bills and coins)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

We learned how to say éspèces a long time ago. Now we're supposed to use a new word. You know you're really learning a language when you start learning synonyms!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gammel_Gargamel

Can it mean "Do you have some liquid?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

No, not unless some other context were provided.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kjergens

Why "du liquide" instead of "de liquide"? I would think "du liquide" would translate to "some of the cash" (specific cash).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonVan2

Wordreference.com defines liquide as cash and offers it in the form of "acheter qch en liquide" meaning to pay for in cash.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1OwOl

"Do you have some/any liquidity?" should be accepted, since that word exists in English: liquidity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misawa.mandi

Monsieur Krabs, est-ce que vous?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kminsinger

I am only one here keeps trying to answer this as "Do you have cash?"? I think this is equally correct in the context of American English, but maybe it's just the folks I hang out with. Could we answer this "Do you have (read: any/some) cash?"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheilagh0

I put 'are you solvent' - I was wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parsamana

in slang, I would think "are you liquid" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

This sentence is not slang.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

As someone who grew up with a mother who is a personal tax-account this is the first thing I thought of too to express this in English. I've never heard it expressed as asking if a person or business is liquid, but rather solvent.

I would like to know if the French liquide can mean the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesprit_de_l...

You must have heard of liquid assets. When a business is liquid, or sufficiently liquid, it means that it has enough liquid assets to cover its short-term debts. The Liquidity Ratio is a measure of its ability to do so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agapoyesoun

With airline travel and security issues it is an oft asked question: "Any liquid, Sir?", "Any liquid, Ma'am?", "Do you have any liquid?" ad infinitum. In this context it means literal 'liquid'.


[deactivated user]

    This lesson is about economics, not cooking or science.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesprit_de_l...

    Is this where the English "quid" comes from? (Misheard "le quid"?)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tophercronin

    So, there is another question similar to this that does not have a discussion option, so I figured I'd ask it here:

    Write “cash” in French

    I wrote "le liquide" and it is not accepted (it only accepts "la monnaie"). Does "liquide" REALLY mean cash, or is it slang that is only accepted in certain phrases?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rulrok

    Is liquide in the sense of the net gain?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

    No. It's just cash money. Simple if you don't overanalyze it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eehrakles

    damn i didn't know that "to be liquid" does not mean "to have cash"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George418878

    That's why when a company sells off its property it is called "liquidation" -- they are converting their buildings, equipment, etc into "liquid"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoOneTellsIt

    Why won't you accept "Do you have liquid"? I've reported it at least twice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesprit_de_l...

    An owl obviously won't have liquid.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenchCrazy

    We're in the "economic" lesson portion of Duo. It's cash


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

    To be liquid can mean to have funds so why was I marked incorrect for saying "are you liquid" ? Weird sentence but then there are many of those on DL!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

    It's not weird when it's properly translated, as at the top of this page.

    Liquide = cash. Très simple.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redseadragon

    Just curious how did liquide became the word for cash? When i think of liquid i think of water.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSA_GW
    • 1311

    With all discussions of 4 years, there is NONE answering how to say " do you have any liquid".

    May anyone knowing that help please?

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