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"¿Cuántas ausencias tienes?"

Translation:How many absences do you have?

0
4 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Syneil
Syneil
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A more natural translation would be "How many absences have you had?", I think. Thoughts?

Edit: from the thread discussion I now think the semantics are different. Although, this is still a very niche example.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The sentence is in the present tense.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annaannaannaan

yes but as a native English speaker I would only say it as Syneil has suggested.

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zacherri10

As a native English speaker both sound find to me.

23
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanvg
susanvg
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Actually, a native speaker would say "How many times have you been absent?"

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Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo

I agree susanvg. The sentence construction and the sense of it may be understandable in Spanish but the possession of an absence is illogical in English.

3
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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It is actually very logical. Just think about it ;-)

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5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
PeterStockwellPlus
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Exactly, the translation as it stands is DLese at its worst.

1
4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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No, not true. I am a native speaker and I would say, "How many absences do you have?"

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5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zacherri10

Yeah, I agree that to be absent seems like more common usage than to have an absence. But I don't think to have an absence is illogical. Especially if you're talking about attendance statistics. If throughout the year you miss class 3 times then you have 3 absences. You've been absent 3 times. It's all the same. I'm not batting an eyelash either way.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshthegreat36

In some jobs you're allotted a certain amount of absences before you're penalized for it. If I just got a job, it would be correct for my friend to ask me the question; "¿Cuántas ausencias tienes?" Asking in the past perfect tense would imply that I have already been absent.

23
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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No not true. I am a native English speaker and I use the present tense for this sentence almost every day when I text my girlfriend. In her case it is "lates". She is allowed 5 lates each month. So I often ask her "How many lates do you have?" If she has 5, then I encourage her to be on time. If she has 0, then I say good girl good job.

1
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay591500

You don't possess an absence. It's taking about missing something, not getting. Thus "had" feels more natural.

1
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DroppedBass
DroppedBass
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"absence" is used to refer to a count of an absence event. For example, if in a job contract it says you get a bonus if you aren't absent for more than 2 days each month, "absences" or "ausencias" refers to how many times you have been absent.

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simpsongeorge

Maybe it is speaking to a teacher or class??. In that case you would have many absences at a present moment... not really clear as absence could be a thing collected over time for one person(how many absences do you have [on the record]), but is colloquial, not proper english, but is it proper spanish?

so is this meant to be in the present tense....or in the past tense like we'd say colloquially treating absence like some grade you collect as you go on?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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I think there may be a context issue here. Although I agree with you for my initial instinct, if a colleague and I were counting absences of staff and checking them against one another, I might well say 'How many absences do you have?'

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

"How many absences have you had?" changes some context. This means that the person has had absences in the past, but (s)he doesn't have them anymore. When asking "How many absences do you have?" you do not imply that the person has absences, so they can answer the question with the word "None.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaymondGri3
RaymondGri3
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It could be one teacher asking another teacher how many students were absent today.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pat92981

i put "How many absentees do you have ?" not accepted. 06/12/2017

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
PeterStockwellPlus
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Nobody says how many absences do you have, did you have. Nobody, except non English speakers. The answer is How many times have you been absent . The present preferred answer is another example of crap DLese.

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pat92981

I said "How many asentees do you have ? " and it failed me.!

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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No not true. "how many absences do you have" = what is the current count. Let's say you are allowed 3 absences per month. How many do you have, as of today? The question refers to now.

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Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zipster_
zipster_
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Better: How many times have you been absent.

Sadly, the English in this course is often not that of a native speaker.

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrodriguez85

The correct would be "Cuantas faltas tienes?"

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Wouldn't that mean "How many faults/mistakes do you have" using "faltas" ?

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

In Spain we would say: ¿Cuántas faltas tienes? When a student miss class. The issue is education.

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nictheman
nictheman
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What does this mean?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

You are a student in a Spanish class, and the teacher reduces your grade if you miss class. One of your fellow classmates asks this question. = How many times have you missed class?

30
Reply44 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nictheman
nictheman
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... Nice answer hahaha. Cheers!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoveForsberg
LoveForsberg
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As a non-native English speaker, this is the point where I get corrected on my English rather than my Spanish. Still useful, as my goal is to better my language skills in general.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtturman
dtturman
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I wonder why the bot gives you a pass on some misspellings and not others. Third time gig for "ausencias"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

As far as I've been able to figure it out, the bot allows a one-letter misspelling as long as 1) it doesn't create a different word, and 2) it doesn't change the gender of the ending. But more than one letter wrong isn't accepted. There may also be allowable and non-allowable letter substitutions, accepting T for C and B for V for example, but I'm not sure about that.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahOak

I feel that not only is 'How many absences have you had?' more natural, but it is also just one example among many of the present tense being used in Spanish where the perfect tense would be used in English. For example 'Vivo aquí hace dos años' means 'I HAVE lived here for two years'.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

The English phrases "have you had" and "do you have" are not the same. Even if both were valid translations for the given Spanish, it's pointless to argue that one is "more natural" than the other without more context. You're quite right about Spanish present tense being flexible enough to accommodate different tenses in English. The reverse is also true.

Incidentlally, I think a much more likely translation of your example sentence is "I lived here two years ago." That's also not present tense in English, but it's a more accurate translation of "hace dos años," which makes the perfect tense sound awkward at best. A native Spanish speaker would surely use "por dos años," "durante dos años," or even "desde hace dos años" to say "for two years."

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Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katibryson
katibryson
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a lot...... lol

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesDain

Has Duo been playing hooky again?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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arggghhhhh when DL gave me the answer I can understand what it meant, but before that I seriously do not know you can say that! this is really frustrating for one who is not native English speaker

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickyc31
Nickyc31
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I love the way it corrects my English! Smart ass

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dalewier

The word "absence" means the state of being away; the time during which one is away; the condition of not having something needed or desirable ; lack.this word is a noun The word "absent" means missing or not present; not exsistant;lacking; feeling or exhibiting inattentiveness. This is used as an adjective. (These definitions are according to the American Heritage Dictionary) My point is that the way this sentence is used (in the education section) it appears to me the english word that should be used is absent or absents or absentees not absence or absences

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'm sure this has already been addressed.
Ah yes. I see joshthegreat36 and simpsongeorge 8 months ago, jamaud 7 months ago, BPS-PenuelO 3 months ago, rspreng 2 years ago, fireman_biff 12 months ago, and Adina_atl 9 months ago.
An appropriate interpretation has been established several times already.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annamorris75

If asking a teacher, I would say "How many absentees do you have?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

It's not exactly the same. Absentees refer to the people who were absent. Absences refer to the times that people were absent.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PratitiShi

Would tienes cuántas ausencias be also correct?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mads608534

How MUCH absence do you have i/o how many... ??

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annel664508

How many times were you absent

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Although your version conveys almost exactly the same sense as the more literal translation, it is a very different construction. Duo is very unlikely to accept it as correct for that reason.

In my experience, the only times Duo accepts many different translations are:
1 . When ambiguities legitimately admit two or more different ways to translate a word or phrase
2 . When working with colloquialisms or idiomatic expressions in proverbs or other sayings that are not meant to be translated word-for-word
3 . When there is no English equivalent to a particular word or phrase in Spanish and you have to interpret the intended meaning
4 . When there is a convention for translating standard Spanish constructions to standard but different English constructions (think verbs like gustar)
5 . When there is enough vehement rejection of the more literal translation in favor of something else

There may be other instances that I don't recall and the last one is sort of a catchall that shouldn't count, since it's subject to change, but these should give you a pretty good idea of what's likely to happen here.

1
Reply8 months ago