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"Yo quería que hubiera suficiente tiempo para hablar con ella."

Translation:I wanted there to be enough time to talk to her.

4 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/allijohn
allijohn
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The English translation is very awkward

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

Not just awkward - downright incorrect. "I wanted that there was to have enough time to speak with her." doesn't make any sense at all in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

This must have be fixed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoMonster
DuoMonster
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But "que" can mean "to" not always "that" but im not sure why they need to have more than one uses for different words

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

English has words with more than one meaning also. An example is bat (baseball) and bat (the animal). English does not have words with over 25 meanings, though (as far as I know). Some Spanish words have so many unrelated meanings that they are hard to learn if you have not grown up with the language. For your perusal: http://www.spanishcentral.com/translate/dejar. That is a pretty amazing number of meanings. I don't think I encountered anything like this in French or German, but would have to check to be sure.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daduolingovid

I tried, "I wished I had time to talk with her"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blindkiwi
blindkiwi
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This really is the most sensible translation. I have reported it as a suggested translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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How about "I wished that I had sufficient time to talk with her."?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinnBirk
LinnBirk
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My translation was: "I wanted you to have sufficient time to talk with her" - in the dictionary I/he/she/it/you was all possibilities. Is this only wrong because hubiera is an expression in this context or is there other explanations as well? What would my sentence have been in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Hubiera" (there would be) is the conditional form of "hay" ("there is/are"). Also, when any form of querer is followed by "que," that is a tipoff that the subjunctive is being used. Keep in mind the literal translation: I wanted/wished that THERE WOULD BE enough time to speak with her. Along these lines, I'm thinking that "I wished there were enough time to speak with her" might be the best translation because it is the past subjunctive in English.

Even though the rule is that "were" is used with every person in past tense subjunctive, this looks weird to native English speakers because the plural "were" is used with the singular noun "time." That's why this subjunctive form is rarely written in English and is on its way to becoming archaic. However, if you say it a few times and substitute a plural noun, you'll see how natural the subjunctive is in speech, and perhaps notice more when native speakers use it, as they do frequently, in their everyday conversations.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

I think that "hubiera" is imperfect subjunctive. "Habría" would be the conditional in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncapdley

I thought that too. Perhaps because it doesn't state 'el/ella hubiera...' we should assume it refers to 'yo'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreaMijares

I think that you can't use "I wanted you" because you're changing the meaning of the phrase using "you".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Even though he/she/it may be in the options given, in the vast majority of DL exercises, rarely do you need to change 'I' to 'He', for ex., 'If I were to be the president, I'd be very famous. (solely talking about me, 1st person) In the case of' I'd have thought he'd have come.', DL will almost always clarify with an additional él/ella (3rd person) to make sure you are talking about the right person.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

If the sentence specifies a sex, then that is the sex that is meant, and it should not be changed. What the pulldown menu is acknowledging is that, unlike English, the pronoun is built into the verb in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luvlearning

That is almost exactly what I wrote as well..."I wanted you to have enough time to speak with her." It counted off for "you". But I thought those were all possibilities. Why is it just "i". Couldn't "que hubiera" mean "that you/he/she had..."?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinnBirk
LinnBirk
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Good to know I'm not alone on being a bit confused on this matter ;) Let's see if anyone out there has the answer. Maybe it's because it is the same as the notion "hay", but then the options in the dictionary are confusing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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My understanding is that haber is impersonal, so there are no you/she/he conjugations.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Why "I wanted to have enough time to talk to her." isn't possible ?

I'm not native english speaker so sorry if there is an obvious reason... ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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Not only is "I wanted to have enough time to talk to her" a good sentence in English, I think it is more commonly used than "I wanted there to be enough time to talk to her". (But sometimes Duolingo wants the more direct translation.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

your version changes 'to be' (hubiera) into 'to have' (tendria, I think). The meaning is the same, but Duo apparently wants hubiera

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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I think I know why Duo wants (logically) this: "there is" = "hay", so here it's logical that "hubiera" gives "there to be".

By the way, the subj. past of tener is tuviera not tendria (condicional).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phamngochan_93

i don't understand why "hubiera" can not mean "to have", because i thought "HABER" was supposed to mean "to have"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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  • there is (to be) = hay (haber)
  • to have = tener (except when auxiliary, in this case it's haber)
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

haber = to have, yes, but only as a helping verb, not to indicate possession. that would be "tener"

I have eaten already. Yo ya he comido.

She has written a book. Ella ha escrito un libro.

etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"Haber" is only used as a "helper" in complex Spanish verb tenses where the English "have" or "had" would be used in the translation, as in "I have been to the store" or "I had been to the store." "Haber" is never used to express the English "have" or "had" as a possessive verb on its own, as in "I have a new car" or "I had an old hat," which would both require a conjugated form of "tener" or another verb of possession.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robth

I would agree with you but DL have put "to have" as one possible translation. Work that out!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorenoAlejandro

I wanted to have enough time to talk to her = Yo quería (Quise works too) TENER suficiente tiempo para hablar con ella

So, it isn't possible :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Con ella = with her

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Indeed. Even if it probably wasn't the problem for Duolingo since "to her" is already in their default answer (showed on this page). ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Lo siento.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nolandh1

what is wrong with " I wished that there would have been sufficient time to talk with her"? The "correct" solution seems awkward to me. "I wanted that there had been sufficient time" I am a native English speaker. My Spanish is not very good, but the above English example reads very awkward to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kumar.Listo

Now, this should be treated as correct, I think: "I wanted there to be sufficient time for talking with her."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

[I wanted there to be sufficient time to talk to her.]

This was accepted & I would like to review why I chose this response. It may help someone else & if my thinking is wrong someone may have some advice. Before I begin this is a very tough module.

I need two subjects, two verbs and two clauses. [Yo quería] que [hubiera ....] meets the criteria. I is the subject of the first clause & quería the imperfect 1st person verb. The subject of the second clause is impersonal. So that means I use haber impersonal not a person. There was/were Haber 3rd person plural preterite is hubieron Drop the 'on' and add the 'a' to make it imperfect or past subjunctive. Hubiera as 'There was' is equal to 'there to be' in the context of the sentence.

Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

I wrote : I wanted that I would have sufficient time to speak with her. (meaning - I hoped that I would have sufficient time to talk with her) And DL says 'there'd been time'. WT@# That doesn't even make sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

I wanted that I'd have sufficient time. What's wrong with 'I would have'??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Has to do with time itself. "Wanted" is simple past tense, so the sentence as you wrote it would work if 1) you used present tense and changed the translation to "wish" and 2) placed the second part of the sentence in the past by using past tense: I wish that I had had sufficient time... . This is a very loose translation of "I wanted there to be sufficient time ... .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milus38

"I wanted to have sufficient time in order to talk with her" was marked wrong. I thought that an implicit meaning of "para" in "in order to".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flandazabal1

I wanted to have enough time to talk to her

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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IMO:
- Yo quería que hubiera suficiente tiempo para hablar con ella. <-> I wanted there to be enough time to talk to her.
- (Yo) quería tener suficiente tiempo para hablar con ella. <-> I wanted to have enough time to talk to her.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Lo siento. I pressed the down arrow when I meant to press reply. Con ella = with her.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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NB: You can press agin the down arrow to make your downvote disappear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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That is good to know. It's not the first time that's happened to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marge54
marge54
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Hello everybody ! TO HAVE in spanish has two sens : HABER / TENER 1°) TO HAVE = HABER Ex. HE comprado un coche >I have bought a car : the subject does a concrete action (to buy) or endure something ex. He oido - He visto - He recibido ... - 2°) TO HAVE = TENER Ex. TENGO un coche >I have a car : the subject possess a car - 3°) TO HAVE TO = TENER QUE / DEBER DE Ex. TENGO QUE / DEBO DE comprar un coche >I have to buy a car OR I must buy a car : the subject have a need or the obligation to buy a car. I hope these explanations will help you !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

Duo suggests: I wanted that there was enough time to talk to her." Is that right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It is literal, and if you have trouble converting Spanish subjunctive to English subjunctive, I suggest that you start by thinking of it this way in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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what is wrong with: "I would like it to have more time to talk with her"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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You might say "I would like it if I had more time to talk with her", but the way you have it isn't correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You could just omit the "it" because "to have more time to talk with her" is an infinitive phrase being used as a direct object. Of course, yours is a loose translation that uses "more" as a translation for "suficiente" (enough). When duo is giving complex sentences to translate, I find that it's more particular about the little things.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gez70
Gez70
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I wrote- I wanted there to be enough time in order to speak to her- it was marked wrong but para means -in order to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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"para" also means "to" or "for". Here, translating "para" as "to" would be the more frequent usage: "enough time to speak with her" describes the amount of time wanted. Using "in order to" here seems more awkward to me, and also seems as if one is trying to imply more of an active decision process.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AJRAJR
AJRAJR
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Is the outcome important? Does it matter whether or not there was sufficient time?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/technickl

This is a bad one. Doesn't make any sense in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamHud8

"I wanted enough time to talk with her" is not accepted WHY?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roihu7
Roihu7
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"I wanted there to be enough time to talk with her" was accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porkrind94
porkrind94
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This translation doesn't even follow Spanish rules. Haber is to have as well as to be. also Translating from Spanish to English. "I wanted you to have sufficient time to talk with her." is better translation and just as common in English. They are really working hard to expand, but seems like they need more people to contribute to the correcting side of the program.

2 months ago