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  5. "The boy eats lunch."

"The boy eats lunch."

Translation:Pojken äter lunch.

March 9, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astimamiglio

Had no idea lunch was also lunch in Swedish...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

The more you know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hornedhorse9

Is lunsj correct ? Or is that just Norwegian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

That is Norwegian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanHill16

"Middag" is normally the evening meal, not the mid-day meal, which keeps tripping me up. For anyone else who makes my mistake, this explained it for me: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6176753


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milan179412

I agree with other people who mentioned mistake in the sentance. Actually the mistake is that program is giving solution launch for both languages


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FinchThing

The "ch" sound is kind of a "sh" sound, yes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppo17

... Anyway... What is "lunch" in English? just any meal or just the midday meal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyraBottema

Lunch in English is the meal you eat at midday


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoMez194517

What is the difference between lunch and frukost?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

frukost is 'breakfast', the first meal we eat in the morning. lunch is 'lunch', most typically eaten at 12 (depending on your work of course). middag is 'dinner', the meal typically eaten when people get home from work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikLeh2

Wait... Im not a native English speaker so i never noticed,but... Middag is in the evening? I though middag and lunch were the other way around!? Followup question:what is the name for 12:00 in swedish? Its noon/midday in English,mittag in German,but what in sewedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skidoo4

Hahaha:-( :-( :-( :-(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachaelWhi630840

So I was a bit confused, can the word äter mean both eats and is eating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanHill16

Yes. There's a module later on how you can phrase things in the continuous. In English, we mostly use the continous and only use the simple present for describing a general pattern of behaviour. In Swedish, in general you use the present tense (äter), and only use the continuous if you want to emphasise that something is going on right now.

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