https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

Moving to another language

So, it's over a year now since I first started learning Spanish. It is one of the great amusements in life to learn a new language, I can guarantee that. Now I don't want the fun to stop. Yes, being able to speak three language would give multiple job opportunities, but I think about four, five, maybe eleven languages! Yes, indeed, I'm kinda insane when It comes to this matter I know there are 7000+ languages out there in the world, I only want to speak 99 of them (not sure if too much or too little) ok that was a joke, I only intend to speak 79 languages.

So, My question is, concerning learning five languages or so in my twenties, Is it okay moving to a new language after only one year of learning a certain language? I know mastering a language takes time, but my point here is if you could learn the basics of a language and become able to converse comfortably with native speakers, but you are not at the stage of mastery yet, would it be convenient to start learning a new language, and practice the two languages in parallel?

If yes -and I hope so-, I've always loved French and France generally. The French speaking community has a rich culture, so I've been thinking about starting French. What I know about it is that it is hard, Harder than it looks. So, Anyone could advise me? would starting French affect my Spanish skills now? learning Spanish helped me understand the roots of English words and that actually made me better in both English and Spanish. Would it be so with French or should I wait? In fact I had Portuguese in mind as a next step after Spanish, but I also want to start French, so I'm now getting more confused. I need to hear your stories about this.

Thanks for anyone who bothered to read this terribly long post, sorry about that. And one more thing. I'm not the first to say that, but this is an advice for every Spanish learner here on duolingo. Right after you finish your Spanish tree, start your reverse tree (that one won't take much time) and search you tube for "Language Transfer - Complete Spanish", This audio series of Spanish lessons would make your brain absorb the language, literally absorb it. This is my advice if you want to get better. Thanks all!!

March 9, 2015

18 comentarios


https://www.duolingo.com/rmoppenh
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One idea would be to try out the French for Spanish speakers tree for a few levels to see if you like it. It could force you to continue to think in Spanish while beginning French, and would highlight both the structural similarities (in grammar and vocabulary, at least) and subtle differences of the two languages.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kimberlytylr
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That is not a bad suggestion. Just be wary of imposing the grammar and structures you learned in Spanish onto the French language. They are so similar in some ways it is easy to do. I studied Spanish for a few years before starting French and drove my French teacher crazy with always wanting to leave off the pronouns. :-)

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

Wow! That was brilliant! Thanks! another question please. You are at level 12 in French. Did it cause you any confusion with any other language you have been studying? I worry about this much.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rmoppenh
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Well, I'm trying my own experiment right now. French is my new language, which I've been studying for about a year (not only on Duolingo). A few months after opening my account, I also started in on the German tree - I studied German about twenty-five years ago, so in a sense that is "review," but I've forgotten a lot of vocabulary. But, anyway, German and French are totally different, so no confusion there.

More recently, I started in on the Spanish from French tree - that is my Spanish flag. Spanish is also something I studied a long time ago - more like thirty years, in this case - so there is a certain amount of it that is latently in my head. I don't think it is really causing confusion, in part because the two languages sound so different. I might feel differently if I were trying to mix, say, Spanish and Italian without being completely solid on one.

But I should also note that my goals and my style might not be the same as yours. I'm not really going for "fluency," whatever that is, so much as reading knowledge combined with fair-to-middling conversational ability. And I go in for things like comparative grammatical analysis and side-by-side etymology - that French uses partitive articles and Spanish doesn't, or that Fr. cheval and Sp. caballo share a Latin root. Whether it helps me or not, it keeps me interested...but if that is not your style doing French from Spanish might not be as appealing to you.

March 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LegatonMik
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This is a good tip, I think. It's what I'm doing at least ^^

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
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You sound like you're passionate about French, so I say go for it.

Yes, I think one year is plenty of time between languages. French is more difficult at the start, but it's easier by the time you're good enough to do Immersion. French syntax tends to lock the elements of sentences together. With Spanish, it's often a challenge to figure out where the subject and object are.

Everyone has a problem confusing language #2 with language #3 for a while. Just be prepared for that. It'll eventually go away. It's as though the brain learned that there were only two languages: English and "foreign" and for a while it keeps trying to fit your new language into the "foreign" bucket where language #2 resides. You'll find yourself powerfully wanting to use the wrong words and even grammar from time to time. As I said, it goes away with time. Don't let it freak you out too much.

As for cross-contamination back to Spanish, I haven't seen this at all for any language I've learned except Italian, and even there it's minor.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

Thank you for this comment, sir. I'm now set to start learning French. I am looking forward to expand this "foreign" bucket as large as I can. Actually, English is my foreign language that I relate any new language to it. Arabic is my native language and it is kinda tricky to get eastern and western languages in your mind, but no problem, I'm gonna learn 'em all! Thanks again!

March 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
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There are many children who have to learn two languages at one time. The second language starts one year after the first one.

I have had problems to separat two languages when they were suddendly taught in the same room. That would be the same here, because Duolingo does not change the layout. I think one can handle it, but it is a question of concentration.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

That is a good point. I read about children in Japan who spend years learning their own native language, besides another language. They could master the other language before mastering Japanese. That made me think about it. I'm a native Arabic speaker, speaking English for over 15 years now and had 14 months of intense Spanish learning. At this exact moment I can say that I can communicate in those three languages. What I wanted was adding French to these language to widen my connections. I only worry about the differences between French and Spanish, and how could it affect my Spanish progression. I think I'm gonna give it a try anyway.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
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:) You will smile someday, when you write the first time a spanish word instead of a french word in the text box. But this can happen and it is not a problem. It happen more often to people who are already fluent in a language. It happens less if you switch less or if you have a good switching-rhythmen/methode.

Give it a try! You have learned Spanish long enough to be able to switch easyly. If you do the immersion with Spanish and the learning topics in French you will never have problems because of switching. Taking the wrong language only happened to people when they mixed the same activities. That is according to what some users told here in Duolingo and to my experiences.

Nobody wants to hinder you from doing the learning topics in Spanish and French at the same time. Try it, and look what happen. Normally nothing (no switching) happen.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
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Die Angst ist was dich lähmt, schieb sie doch zur Seite! ;) We are all the same and we are all individual at the same time. You must try it, it does not help you to fear about foreigen/strange experiences.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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Well said! :)

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

Thank you for your positive comment :) That actually helped me a lot :) I have Deutsch on the list as well! at least this is a language I have a solid background about.

March 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kimberlytylr
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I would say go for it, but you have to find a way to keep things straight. It might be helpful to start the new language in a different way first or, what I did when I started Dutch, Danish, and Swedish simultaneously here on Duolingo is start a notebook. I have all three languages across the top of each page and then I write down the vocabulary words as I learn them so I can see across all three languages easily for comparison.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MoatasemSamir

May I ask a question? how long did it take you to learn all these languages?

March 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kimberlytylr
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I'm really just a dabbler. I would honestly say that I am still learning all of these. I have had the opportunity to speak German, French, and Spanish in social/work situations and can hold my own but I studied all three of these in college. Beyond that I my skills are untested but really I just like to play with languages, finding patterns and such.

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje
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If you want to learn French, I suggest learning it from Spanish so that you strengthen your skills in Spanish as well as learning a new language! :)

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Finneganegan

I took Spanish in school, before moving onto Latin, and then went into French on my own. And for me, I really enjoyed both. Because the languages sound so different in my head, I am easily able to keep vocabulary and grammar separate. Cause when I think in French versus Spanish, my inner voice keeps a distinct difference between how both the languages sound.

So I would recommend it. Also French has a lot of similarities with English that make it easy to learn.

But hey, Spanish has the word zanahoria, which is Arabic, so that's right up your ally too.

March 10, 2015
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