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"Eu ficaria neste hotel até semana que vem."

Translation:I would stay in this hotel until next week.

August 25, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexTheTutor

How is "semana que vem" translated as "next week"? Is this a common expression?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes!! It is used a lot in daily conversation!! Semana que vem = próxima semana, but the first one is much more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexTheTutor

ah..! thank you! :) I am realizing that it seems like there are two kinds of Portuguese.. one for writing.. and one for speaking.. tô nem aí.. sei lá.. cê é pamonha hein!? tá pron.. meio é seis.. semana que vem.. I wish I could focus more on the conversational part :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Unfortunately you're right on what you say =/ and sometimes it is hard to deal with that =(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kplilly

We have the same expression in the US but it didn't accept it when I wrote that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoltan_Nemeth

OK, now I'm just astonished that I didn't understand any of your example sentences...it really must be a different kind of Portuguese :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivisaurus

To add to the discussion, the literal translation of "semana que vem" is "week that comes", so the coming week. That is how we say "next week". =]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceHilary

Or "the following week" which is not accepted, unfortunately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fontaine.B

No... "the following week" would need a reference point to have already been established. (following what?)

For example, it would be correct to say, "I'll arrive at the hotel 6 days before the wedding and then stay through the following week."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

Nextcoming week?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewduo

Not a word I'be ever heard of (and it's not in Wiktionary either). Like Vivisaurus, I'd quite happily use "the coming week" though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jandreslami

Is "...ate a semana que vem." also possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivisaurus

I hope so. That's how I would say it. It sounds a little strange to me without it. But it didn't ask me to write in Portuguese. =]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramon_osuna

I did pt the "a" and Duolingo says it is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HGYsYO

I did as well. I was marked wrong but I don't understand why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinSmit446377

why isn't it 'A semana que vem'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

It should be accepted also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meqEIU

Why is the week to come not accepted? It's maybe not very common but surely correct if not very poetic!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

So...no "a" after "até"? My brethren, I'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fontaine.B

NSFW: that video is "not safe for work"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas.Heiss

My solution was not accepted: "I would stay in this hotel until the next week"

Isn't this proper English?

I read in this thread that this is another suggested PT solution: "ate a semana que vem"

How would you translate this PT sentence to proper English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewduo

I would certainly always just use "until next week".

My feeling is that with the "the", it means you're referring to a week other than the one after this one.

So: "I am in the hotel next week" (the week after this one).

But "I arrive in the hotel on the 20th and will stay until the next week" (ie the week after whatever week the 20th is in).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fontaine.B

Personally, I would be more precise. We stay at a hotel until a certain day, not a certain week. (If someone says "até semana que vem", that leaves me as an American wondering whether the person will check out of the hotel on Sat or Sun or Mon or the following Fri or Sat or maybe even Sun.)

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