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"Det är tjugofem grader i vattnet."

Translation:It is twenty-five degrees in the water.

March 10, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielRhysBowen

I'm not keen on the English translation. It seems more literal, but I'm pretty sure you'd never say "it is twenty-five degrees in the water" in English; you'd say "the water is twenty-five degrees."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boDjwyEj

Even better: "The water temperature is twenty-five degrees."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Both of which are now accepted - we only had Daniel's suggestion above before. :)

Edit: Or, rather: both of which will be accepted as soon as the admin interface stops crashing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boDjwyEj

Into every life a little rain must fall. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BVP2019

Or even ¨The temperature of the water is twenty five degrees''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yan.osh

kan man säger 'vattnet har 25 grader.' också? och 'the water has 25 degrees'? i don't mean for the translation here, but as a common way to express the same fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

No, that doesn't work. You could say vattnet är 25 grader (varmt). We don't use 'har' with temperatures, except about people having a fever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yan.osh

okej. tack för förklaringen! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bleedingorange

Is "grad" related to "градус" in Russian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yep! They're both from a Latin word meaning "a step", since one more degree is one step up the scale, so to speak. The ultimate origin is a Proto-Indo-European word meaning to "go".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bleedingorange

Tack så mycket! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrauaeBoleti

I really don't like the way they translated it to English, because it almost sounds like, "There are 25 degrees inside of the water." Not, "The water is 25 degrees." I don't think native English speaker would ever say, "It is twenty-five degrees in the water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pekarekr

We are accustomed to Fahrenheit degrees in the U.S., but below 32 degrees is freezing. Let's go skating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Just to avoid any misunderstandings, this is to be understood as 25 degrees Celsius, which is 77 degrees Fahrenheit, so the water is actually quite warm and pleasant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tuiksu

What does this sentence actually mean?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

That the water, preferrably some Swedish lake, is twenty-five degrees warm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kivikoti

One would not say "It is twenty-five degrees in the water." Please modify.

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