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  5. "Is maith linn cait agus is m…

"Is maith linn cait agus is maith libh madraí."

Translation:We like cats and you like dogs.

March 11, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristinaH525755

Ye vs we in translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

Ye-> plural you

We-> plural I


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieMadd

How on earth am i supposed to know the english word 'ye' and is it supposed to be you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

This line is in "Prep. 1". What I can't figure out is what word(s) in any of these sentences (in this lesson) are "prepositions". In Béarla, we call over, under, at, on, with, beside, beneath, etc. "prepositions" because they tell us the relative "postion" of subjects and objects in a sentence. Is the definition of this part of speech in Gaeilge different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

le is a preposition. Its 1st person plural prepositional pronoun form is linn, its 2nd person plural prepositional pronoun form is libh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

Okay, so I get that they're "prepositional pronouns". What exactly are those in Irish and how are they typically used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Anytime the object of a preposition is a pronoun they combine to form a prepositional pronoun.

Is maith le Pól cait - le is a preposition.
Is maith liom cait - liom is a prepositional pronoun.
Tá madra ag Pól - ag is a preposition.
Tá madra agat - agat is a prepositional pronoun.
etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

Thank you for your lucid response. That makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gearid15

My great problem is the girl's accent (canúint). If you listen carefully to her saying «linn» I was sure she was saying léi. How come the Irish on Duolingo do not slow down the speech like French or Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

If you think léi is pronounced with a short i, then it's not her dialect (or accent, a completely different thing) that's the problem.

The French and Italian courses use a computerized text-to-speech engine, Irish uses recordings of a person reading the text.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelPat477771

Is that (possibly) why Google Translate does not have spoken Irish available?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KSBMcCann

(For exercises that require you to write to an audio prompt in Irish, it is entertaining to turn on voice recognition as the Irish audio plays.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brigid736503

My answer was correct and matched with answer given but I was marked as incorrect. Is there an issue with grading?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Nobody reading your comment here in a Sentence Discussion has any way of know what your answer was, or what Duolingo's response was.

If you think that Duolingo is malfunctioning, then take a screenshot documenting the issue, and submit a bug report. The people who could fix an issue like the one that you describe do not read the Sentence Discussions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

She pronounces 'cait' as 'quit.' I've not heard anyone pronouncing it that way, but maybe I am living in the wrong part of Ireland. Does anyone know where her accent's from? I don't really recognise it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sliotar.

I've never heard an English speaker pronounce "quit" the way cait is pronounced in this recording - the "t" sound of "quit" is totally different, even in Ireland.

https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/ceann_cait


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Her Cait sounds Connachtish to me, or even not a bad match to Munsterish. Ulster has more of a Kitsch sound, though the I tends towards umlauted O. Ke(r)tsch? Kötsch?

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