"Pas trop de vin, juste une larme, s'il vous plaît."

Translation:Not too much wine, just a drop, if you please.

March 11, 2015

109 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrDemetr

"...just a wee drop please"? This French idiom is translated into Scottish.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neontzars

Which is odder still since none of the Scottish people I know would ever ask for LESS wine (I mean that endearingly). Don't see how this is an idiom in any case

June 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEMastroddi

Have a lingot for insulting the Scottish in a funny way. We know how to live. L.E xx

July 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neontzars

I wouldn't have said it if I weren't Irish. Lot of stereotype spillover.

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEMastroddi

Ah. x

July 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neilcarr

Moi non plus

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidanBarry

"A wee dram" surely

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirMateiu

And what's the idiom here?

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dahurst

You would probably want more than a drop of wine

March 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaraLily

I've heard people ask for 'just a drop', clearly they are asking for more than a drop, usually a small portion. However it also seems to be along the same lines as when some people say that they have to go, pick up their coat, then stay talking for a couple more hours.

April 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"une larme" = literally, "a tear" (as in the salty liquid that comes out of your eyes when you cry).

So the French don't call it "a drop" but "a tear", apparently.

October 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mad.Margaret

My french friends actually taught me to say in English, "Just a tear" when they're pouring. Is that unusual?

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I've never heard it before, myself.

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mad.Margaret

Thanks for the feedback.

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorWight

Very unusual. I also have never heard "just a tear". I usually hear "just a little" or "just a bit". I would love to hear someone say "just a tear" with a french accent when I'm pouring some wine, now that I think about it! hahaha =D <3

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xanderificus

That's what I learned in France, too, when I would stay with English teachers but I was pouring the wine, "Just a tear."

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nelthariodin

Yeah in Turkish when we drink raki (a cultural alcohol beverage) the amount of alcohol has names like a tear to double to full and so many between so it might be a thing in French too.

November 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xanderificus

When I was in France, I was taught it to mean "a tear". I assumed it was a cultural thing because "a drop" would have made more sense to me.

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmett705338

it's probably that they use it in circumstances that don't even have wine probably to say in any place 'not too much please' similar to how we say 'I wouldn't hurt a fly' to explain that we're gentle, even if there aren't flies about, or the action in question is about something much bigger than a fly haha.

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cheyne

This seems very literal. What contexts/situations is it used in other than the literal? Because while it's nice to know the word I knew as tear can also be used for drop . . . well, that doesn't really seem like an idiom.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

You know people who literally drink only a drop of wine?
For the rest of us, this is idiomatic, where "just a drop" means 3 oz instead of the standard 4.

June 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatersCarr

Why does it not accept "Not too much wine, just a drop, if you please"?

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CochiCarrie

It is one of the suggested answers now. :)

March 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DantePowell

said no one ever...

April 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TAshil

Why "de vin" instead of "du vin"?

March 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liit4m

Because when "trop" precedes something (like "vin", in this case), "trop" is always followed by "de". In fact, you could think of the phrase as "trop de" instead of just "trop". This works the same for other words like it: beaucoup de, assez de, peu de, plus de, énormément de, ... and so on.

So... « J'ai du vin, mais lui, il a beaucoup de vin ! » « Est-ce que je t'ai donné trop de viande ? »

April 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TAshil

Merci beaucoup.

April 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kinda_AWF

I would imagine this to be a very common French expression, if it didn't ask specifically for LESS wine.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bfoshizzle

I mistook "larme" for "arme", so I wrote "not too much wine, just a weapon, please"; it seems I'm too use to really weird sentences on Duolingo.

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-AlaBelle

I don't understand what this idiom even really means. Could someone explain?

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The idiom is the middle part, "juste une larme", which Duo translates by default as "just a wee drop".

It means "just a small amount".

The English idiom is "just a small drop", the French is "just a tear" -- in both cases, one exaggerates by naming a very small quantity of wine indeed. (In fact, the quantity is about the same: a tear is essentially one drop of tear fluid.)

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-AlaBelle

So It's really just saying "Just a little bit"?

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

Well yes - though people would often say this out of politeness, and would not object if they received more than a drop! At least that's my experience.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-AlaBelle

Thank you!

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-AlaBelle

Thank you!

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malissa364429

Why is it that the first time I encounter the longest of sentences on this site is in a listening activity?

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

I can't see me ever using this one.

April 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marengoe

I don't think that I'll ever use this sentence in France ;-)

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lindsaypenkrat

In what context would this proverb be used in French?

August 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MightyBraveNight

Is this an idiom or a mini Scotts lesson

July 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demwengins

just a wee drop? ok if you are scottish

August 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.glover

Can you stay 'juste une larme’ in conversation

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

It's a phrase I SHOULD use more often ... :-)

October 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ERGCGILROY

sorry, i dont drink

October 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elaheh.h

What does it mean in english!? Do we have anything equal??

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simularch

Why we can't say "... just a tiny taste...". Remember the great film "Fear and loathing in Las Vegas" where Benisio del Toro states: "You wont need much - just a tiny taste" - I love this phrase... Especially when it comes to adrenachrome)))

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinijaz

Why not "just a tad" instead? It's an expression that can also mean a wee bit.

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GCorti

I translated larme as "tear drop." I seems literally correct to me

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dwendl
  • 1644

I assume that "juste une larme" applies to any liquid, not just wine. Water, soda, even olive oil while cooking. Is there a similar idiom for "just a bit", or "just a tad", or "just a smidgen", etc., for non-liquids (such as sugar, salt, pop rocks)?

July 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parsamana

Are these actual idioms or just translated English ones? I typed it in google (with quote signs) and got only 14 results, hardly indicative of something being a well-known idiom. Secondly, I'm still not exactly clear on what this means. Appreciate clarification on both counts.

September 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZziKonggg

do French say this?

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liit4m

Yes. I ran it by my boyfriend, who is French. He says yes. Since I came across this expression a few months ago, I've used it a few times here in France and it's worked perfectly.

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathwizard1232

Why would you ever use such a phrase? ;-p

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikGhaderi

this is hard

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffDarby

Said it correctly three times. I hate the way these exercises work.

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinareynolds

Who says 'if you please:

March 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503
March 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flo243030

juste une larme = juste un doigt wich is more common but a bit familiar (and then you can make jokes like "un whisky?" "oh, juste un doigt!" "mais vous ne voulez pas un whisky d'abord?" )

August 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheila386395

"Not too much wine, a drop only if you please" What's wrong with that? In English, we can say "a drop only" or "only a drop"

September 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antonsa

I'm sure the idiom must means something like "it's a crying shame" how little wine the drinkee wants. ;-)

September 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmett705338

In case people are confused:

it's probably that they use it in circumstances that don't even have wine. probably to say in any place 'not too much please' similar to how we say 'I wouldn't hurt a fly' to explain that we're gentle, even if there aren't flies about, or the action in question is about something much bigger than a fly haha.

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honey3161

"S'ill vous plaît" means "please" but why it says wrong and 'If you please' is right???

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateSimpson0

are you sure it marked you as wrong? sometimes duolingo mark you as correct, and will show you another correct translation

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHui1026

Not too much wine, just a drop please. WHYISITWRONG?

October 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateSimpson0

are you sure it marked you as wrong? sometimes duolingo mark you as correct, and will show you another correct translation

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chienAL

I can't understand the translation.

October 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/humphreyhandbag

no one's using this one Duolingo, c'mon

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamMurr3

Why "if you please"? Is just "please" not an acceptable translation?

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateSimpson0

are you sure it marked you as wrong? sometimes duolingo mark you as correct, and will show you another correct translation

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alamentzo

I've never heard of this idiom before!!

November 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atnisskay06

How is this an idiom?

January 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dwendl
  • 1644

Not the whole thing. Just the expression "juste une larme" is idiomatic. Literally it means "just a tear".

January 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atnisskay06

Oh, Ok. Thank You!

January 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bijouxlina

<<Just a drop, please. please>>. "Please" implies "if the other is so kind to do so."

January 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimi857086

Way too complex!!!

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YourBoiiiii

GOD! i did "not to much wine just a drop please" but u need to do 2 O's for "to" much wine

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

Yes. "To" and "too" are different words. To means toward or is used in verb infinitives. I go to the store to buy wine. Too means also or excessive. I want to go to the store too, but I am too tired. I remember it by: too has an excessive number of Os.

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenTaue

Please translate in japanese. I can't understand this situation.

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

Who are you asking this of? Your fellow learners who speak French or English, or the developers of this free application? For other languages, the students have to use additional resources for translations.

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenTaue

It was a careless remark. I'm sorry.

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

No need to apologize. I can't imagine the difficulty of navigating two new languages. I am struggling with just one new one.

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaximBonda5

Des est asparagus

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abey466534

I think It's example of life Like less is more or Its sweeter when You have it for less time than more

February 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vegametallara

I would never need this sentence during my holidays. Or ever in fact..

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dwendl
  • 1644

It's not really the sentence that's idomatic; it's the expression "juste une larme". Want some coffee? Oui, mais juste une larme, s'il te plaît.

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulbotwid

As a side note, in Swedish we also use the word tear, but only for coffee. "En kaffetår."

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevCampbel

Said no French person ever. ;)

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/6A-William1

i put to instead of too

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroMSMTeixeira

Just a "drop", oui? ;)

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nagisa.shima

Why won't it accept "Not a lot of wine, just a bit, please"?

July 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PI291011

10 lingots if someone translates this idiom into Spanish!

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/francisFEC

wow

August 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AditiKara

what is the underlying meaning of this sentence?

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheesycowjenkins

This is not an idiom

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

It may not technically be an idiom. It is possible to deduce the meaning. But it is definitely not literal. It isn't even physically possible to pour only a drop out of a bottle of wine.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaidiNguyen

What does this mean? Anyone?

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norah_Zhou

It means like just a teensy weensy bit please

October 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarellIred

my microphone doest work

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valten497

How does Duolingo expect me to learn all of this without teaching me? Without properly knowing the language, I have no choice but to memorise them.

December 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SECRETKING5

my answer doesnt work even when i copy and pasted

February 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SECRETKING5

doesnt work

February 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pauiel

Wont use this phrase.

February 12, 2018
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