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"Ella tiene un buen carácter."

Translation:She has a good character.

5 years ago

106 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

So one may have a good character, but not a bad one? Instead one must have a bad temper?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gosuka
Gosuka
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I tried "good temper" only because of the same previous experience. Not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
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Same here... but according to SpanishDict it would be bad-tempered or good-natured.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlwynM
AlwynM
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Agreed, in English we would say "She is good natured".

We would rarely say "She has a good character/nature ", although it isn't complete nonsense it is less natural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stepps9
Stepps9
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Actually, this is probably regional. I would be more likely to say someone has good character.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

We would use either. One doesn't make the other wrong. Duolingo needs to be consistent on this one. They did not accept "bad character" on the other one, therefore this one should be the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

I answered "she is good natured" and was marked wrong. DL gave me the correction "she is good nature" (huh?) That ain't good English!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thanks for this info, jk. I'm gonna look it up too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krooboy

I've definitely heard 'good-tempered' but usually sarcastically.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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Why is that not acceptable? Can anyone tell me if that's a mistake? Because it makes total sense unless there is another way entirely of saying "good temper"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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In English we say someone has a temper without even saying it is a bad temper and people know that you mean that they get angry easily. Some people don't ever say "good temper" in English. More to the point though. "temper" is often replaced with "genio" (or "humor" which does not mean "humour" as in funny or amusing quality but does mean mood.)

http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/genio

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/temper (Scroll down to the noun, as the verb is first.) Temper is more accurately defined as "a state of feeling or frame of mind at a particular time dominated by a single strong emotion: whether that be composure or anger.

This is where it gets to be confusing: http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/temper In English, sometimes we use temper to mean someone's nature rather than temporary state. We shouldn't, but when that happens the word could mean something similar to character - more accurately translated as "temperamento". The word we should be using in English is "temperament". For example: someone who is hot-blooded has the temperament that frequently is indicated by a bad temper. but someone who has a bad temper might not necessarily be constantly losing their temper. In our minds though someone who exhibits a bad temper will probably do it again. http://dictionnaire.reverso.net/francais-anglais/temperament If you have trouble, add the accent back in. The link wouldn't take you there with the accent, but it can be typed into the search box there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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If someone has a good temper it means a good disposition or good ability to keep themselves in check emotionally. Although generally we say someone is "good-tempered". That is the more common phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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You are right "good-tempered" definitely exists, but check the synonyms for the alternates that people usually use. It is a kind of temperament. Character is a broader term and includes more than just how a person feels and acts, but even how a person thinks, their morals. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/character

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

No, it really doesn't. She has a "good temperament" might mean good disposition. But a good temper also means a lively, strong temper, that's she is temperamental.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

You're looking for good nature or good temperament.

"She has a good temper" would mean that she has a strong temper, that's she is tempermental.

This is the opposite of what you intend and should not be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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'"She has a good temper" would mean that she has a strong temper, that's she is [sic] tempermental.' This is not true for the majority of English speakers.

See my below comment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Go_Mom_Go
Go_Mom_Go
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Only can tell that it's still not accepted. Do you got info on this to upvote? (March 29th 2015)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Still not accepted 2015-09-16.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/17jclela

"Good temper" isn't accepted as of Aug. 16, 2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joycekent1

Isnt she a short for she is ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

What?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tara668
tara668
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I'm curious about the "un" in that there was an earlier exercise where you had to translate from English to Spanish - I think it said "He has a bad temper". They wanted "Él tiene muy mal carácter" and someone mentioned that her answer was rejected for including "un".

So is it true that the article is ok for describing a good character, but not for describing a bad temper, or is this just a DL flaw? (Or a misunderstanding of the situation on my part?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why the UN before buen caracter? Is the phrase.... "A good character" used when describing someone?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caro.ramos

As native speaker, I would say both without distinction.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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I would say "She is good-natured." or "She has a good character."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boot2
boot2
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I put ´temperament´=wrong, why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Most likely because that word, which is actually a subcategory of character, already exists in Spanish: temperamento. http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/temperament/forced http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/character http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/temperament

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnimble
Gnimble
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I don't know why when I saw this sentence, I immediately translate it as "She is of good character". I should translate it more literal next time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I'm struggling with a way to express this idea naturally in English. My response was a literal translation, but I don't like it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M132T003C
M132T003C
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“She is good‐natured” would be more natural than any of the answers I’ve seen, but I don’t believe it is currently being accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carter.ag
carter.ag
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"She has a good nature" would be perfectly fine to say (and was accepted Aug 13, 2014)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I agree and it wasn't accepted for me so I've reported it (28.2.14)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sneuberg

Still not accepted July 25, 2014. Will report

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

I think it does express itself naturally. I thought of in the sense of someone talking about someone else and saying that that person 'has a good character' meaning she follows through, keeps her word, behaves well, etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JobeyinError

It seems pretty natural without the article in English. «She has good character.« Though perhaps it is a bit more common to say «She is a person of character.«

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NadavYehon

Also a code name for she/he is ugly if you want to delve to uses of the phrase in english

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

Our buddies at the Linguee web site give many examples.

http://www.linguee.es/espanol-ingles/search?source=auto&query=tiene++un+buen+car%C3%A1cter

It seems that real use is divided between referring to personality, nature, and temperament; or character as in moral character. Moral character is often made explicit as carácter moral.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melcarne

Can we say, she has a nice personality.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I also said "She has a good personality." After thinking about it though a person good be a good character but have a bad personality. So I will not report this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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You could, but it's not a translation. Personality may be a synonym of character, but it's not the same word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamwaggi

daniel think you´re right hahaha

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan176028

When speaking of loyalty, honesty or other such traits, I have heard, " she has good character", " she is a good character" and " she is of good character".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bilbybog

I wrote 'she is of good character', which is clearly an acceptable English translation. Not accepted. Flagged it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtpetry

Same. 02/25/2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yinyangrunner

Same 08/16/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CreMark
CreMark
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No entiendo. Puedo decir "UN buen carácter" pero no puedo decir "un mal carácter"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardopasa
ricardopasaPlus
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I continue to insist that in English we use a form of to be not to have with respect to one's "character". Actually, we hardly ever use this word anymore.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stepps9
Stepps9
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We hardly ever use "character" anymore? Since when?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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'She is a good character' has a different meaning from 'she has a good character'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pieter198825

= Ella es feo.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamwaggi

'she has a good caracter' shouldn´t it be correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I'm not being snarky, but was it rejected because of spelling? (character)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

What am I forgetting? Why is there an accent on the 'a'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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If there wasn't an accent, the emphasis would be on the last syllable.

http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishpronunciation/a/stress_accent.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkelbaugh

Since we use caracter for temper,I purposely use temperament here. It was marked wrong. I think not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"Temperament " is "temperamento" in Spanish.

"Temper " is "genio".

"carácter" is "character "

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Too bad duolingo doesn't consistently agree with this. Also, a native spanish speaker on a different thread on here said "mal caracter" means "bad temper" where he lives. Just like English, words are not always used by their original/real meanings.

Thank you for pointing out the different words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Yes, there are many expressions that need to be watched out for:
http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/caracter cáracter

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkelbaugh

Why is personality marked wrong. In the English- Spanish dictionary, caracter includes character, personality and nature.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Because you're talking about synonyms, not direct translations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"personality " is "personalidad". Why do you persist in switching words just because it is not something that you would commonly say? Perhaps you would like a good dictionary? http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/personalidad

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ADiSabella

"She has a good temperment" was not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"temperament" is "temperamento"

"temper" is "genio"

"character" is "carácter"

http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/caracter

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/350zavage

Wouldn't "She has a great character." be acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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That would be "Ella tiene un gran carácter."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ferafona

Lol. This is what i was taught, but it seems not here. I dunno why. Sorry to compound your confusion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PamAries

why not behaviour? thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poohgirl1
poohgirl1
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Buen means good and great. I see nothing wrong with saying she has a great character.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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It CAN, it's true, but if you look in most dictionaries 'good' will be the first (and sometimes only) definition given. Perhaps Duo is making the point that we oughtn't assume that buen means great, when it is usually only good?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardopasa
ricardopasaPlus
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In English we do not say "one has character". The verb tener in Spanish is almost always translated in English as to be not to have.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stepps9
Stepps9
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This is categorically not true. We do say in English that one has character. All the time. It's a very common phrase. And tener is never translated as "to be" unless it's a construct we don't have an equivalent for like "tengo hambre" which literally means "I have hunger" but we say as "I am hungry". (This is the same in most romance AND Germanic languages, by the way).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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We absolutely do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

what's the problem with fine?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

"She has a great character" failed even though it said buen means "great" too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/750jones

why is this not , ella tiene una buena caracter

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Because carácter is masculine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

Why is "she has a good personality" not accepted? I'm reporting this as an acceptable answer but I'd like it if someone could give me a concrete explanation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SherifHoss7

I used She has a nice character and it was not accepted! Is there sth wrong with my English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

Yeees that would mean she has a character, as in a fictional person, and that person is good. "Nice" is not used to describe personality, only people or actions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desconocido13

Good personality?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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strange: just a few seconds before DL put me down, when I wrote "tiene un buen carácter" - in that last exercise my "un" was not accepted. How can that be?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glennaldo

I didn't know Brendan Rogers worked for Duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Can the word "carácter" be used in the sense of a fictional character (in a book/play/movie)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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That would normally be "personaje."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanpalm3

It would be "she has a good character" or "she it's good natured". "She has good character" is not a complete sentance. In English we might say "she has good character traits".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanpalm3

Surely it would be "good temperament" instead of "good temper"? which another way of saying "a nice disposition". "Good temper"? never heard or read that before.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stocker65

Deliberately wrote temper instead of character to see what would happen. It was marked wrong. Is there inconsistency or simply different translations in different contexts?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeniseIvan

What happened to She has A good character ! The A isnt required here so why required on "you have good memory".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neha454059

Why is it not she has "a" good character. As "un" is being used

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DagmarRied

There is an " a "-before good -this is not idiomatic

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannaesp
hannaesp
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You need - A - good character, in english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Not necessarily.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet
espofleet
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No puede ser She has a good temper?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Temper and Character aren't synonyms, so no. To say someone has a good temper usually means they have good control of their emotions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet
espofleet
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Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

Not always. To say someone has a good temper can just as well mean that she has a strong temper (ie, she loses it easily). 'She has a good temperament' is closer in meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Hence 'usually'. You seem hell-bent on making the assertion in this comments section that 'good temper' means 'strong temper' as often as it means 'even temper'. While this may be true in your locality of English, it is not the common meaning in the majority of English, where 'good temper' is essentially equivalent of 'a good temperament' and 'good-tempered', which all indicate an easy-going, not easily upset attitude.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

I'm not "hell-bent' on anything, except I like English to retain its nuances. For instance, I like 'literally' to mean something other than it's antonym 'figuratively'. I distinguish between bi-monthly and semi-monthly. And I make a distinction between dubious and doubtful.

It is very easy for a language to 'dumb down'. when many of the nuances take decades to learn. Please don't insist that your un-nuanced version is the "correct one" either. Why not accept this previously unknown tidbit as a part of the broader English language?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stepps9
Stepps9
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Linguistically, languages don't dumb down. They go through "semantic shift". It's been happening since the beginning of language. And different dialects will have different "nuances" and all are EQUALLY correct.

Personally, I have never heard "good temper" in terms of a strong, easily-lost temper. Not disagreeing that it could also mean this, but having lived in almost every area of the US, it is doubtful that it is part of the "broader English language."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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Because we're translating between Spanish and English. Using a sense which is uncommon in English and non-existent in Spanish is absurd. I'm all for nuance in language, but translation is NOT the place to pushing a pet phrase out of obscurity. Adding to what Stepps9 said, I've lived in the UK and Canada, and deal with European 'international English' on a daily basis, and I have never heard this sense. It is doubtful that it is in common usage, and doubtless that it is inappropriate for use in translation, and ESPECIALLY learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gea71
Gea71
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I wrote 'She has a good personality' because in Dutch (my native language) we would also use 'zij heeft een goed karakter' which is the literal translation of 'Ella tiene un buen carácter'. I have never translated this in English as 'She has good character.' It is just not used in the same way so I thought maybe in Spanish it's the same? Is there any bilingual Spanish - English person who could answer this question?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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You're right, it is a VERY similar meaning, but it's not a translation. 'karakter' and 'persoonlijkheid' are different words for a reason, and you'd use them in different ways, right? :) Same with 'character' and 'personality' in English and 'cáracter' and 'personalidad' in Spanish. Hope this helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gea71
Gea71
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Thanks Eccles, it helps in a way. I might have been wrong all these years that I've been living in England but my gut feeling says 'karakter' and 'character' don't translate completely literally in a sentence like 'zij heeft een goed karakter'. I also wouldn't translate the English sentence 'she has a good personality' into 'zij heeft een goede persoonlijkheid'. Would you translate that into 'ella tiene una buena personalidad'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eccles
Eccles
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They don't translate literally, you're right! But my point is that in all three languages they are different words, and have different meaning, and therefore aren't interchangeable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gea71
Gea71
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Ah, I get it now. Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annette851575

Recheck 74 please. A Davis

2 years ago