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  5. "Sind Sie damit fertig?"

"Sind Sie damit fertig?"

Translation:Are you done with that?

August 26, 2013

87 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roasty

For me this is "American speak". I would be more likely to say "Have you finished with that?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarahdod

roasty, I couldn't agree more. I am increasingly irritated by having "correct" English marked wrong, in favour of a colloquial US-English equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LudmorHun

Mark it for Duo so i knows.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimma.I.

Both correct! And, yes! It's American speech vs British. Examples: US: Are you through (or done) with your milk? British: Have you finished your milk? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaicarose2

Both ways are used here in the US. To my grandson just this morning I said "have you finished your cereal?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimma.I.

Of course! Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexbroch

Native speaker, I've heard it both ways with "finished" being preferred in politer or more formal company/setting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XoooOverdose

In the US, no one says "Are you through with your milk". It's always done. (native here) The other is right, but its not as common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TorDog

It must depend on region as I hear "Are you through with your milk". I also heat the other two solutions as well. (also native)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KonaBjarkar

I live in TN (on the VA border) and people here say "are you through with..." all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimma.I.

Thanks a lot! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McMillenMason

Think of it as German, not English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/innybiff

How does that help? Surely the German word means finished not done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamGronem

American english will eventually grow into something else and so will british engish until its just "american" and "british" lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jo93888

Americen speak this way: "God damit"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielethier

But that doesn't make sense. You're using the word 'have' which denotes some sort of possession, which doesn't translate over to German. Example... "Have you done with that" <- doesn't make any sense translated, however 'Are you done/finished with that' translates across much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkGatoo

Idk but the word 'damit' makes me laugh haha anyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

Yes. One of the things Mark Twain liked about German was that it had the word 'damit' in it as a regular word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melpatience

I live in the Caribbean so schooling was with a British influence but media is American influenced and I say all three "are you through/ done/ finished" but I'm more likely to say "are you done with that".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WonkyDonky44

In Northern England you would hear the question "Have you done/finished..." rather than "Are you...".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manny4us

Why is "damit" in the middle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bibliobibulous

How come it couldn't be "they?" "Sind sie". . . "Are they?" I know there must be a perfectly good reason, but unfortunately it evades me. . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oqughuchi

sie vs Sie - sie is 'they' or 'she'; Sie is 'you'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimma.I.

I'm sure "Are you through with it?" is a correct translation, but it was marked wrong. Fertig = finished = through (as in "to be through with sth.").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielethier

I disagree. Through and done have very slight different meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elisabeth_S

depends on what you are used to, though. slightly different meaning can vary regionally - try not to think in absolutes ;-) also, the german sentence has a multitude of possible connotations, depending on how you emphasize/ intonate ..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roasty

Maybe it's the distinction between 'that' and 'it' that they don't accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimma.I.

If so, they should!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megvanw

Why not "have you finished with that?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pileser

why is "are they" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rpratdesaba

Sie (capital "S")= you (polite form). sie (lower case "s")=they. In this case it asks "sind Sie...", therefore it refers to "you" in the polite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trojax1

why is it you and not they? how do you tell its the polite form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rpratdesaba

the polite form uses capital "S". That is how you tell them apart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidi815736

US English speaker (teacher) here. "Finished" is the grammatically correct word. "Through" is also grammatically correct. You can definitely say, "are you 'done' with that?" instead, and everyone would understand you, but speaking from a very technical angle, "done" usually refers more to cooking or baking, and food's actual time of completion, and less about an action being executed by a person. All three words, 'through', 'finished', and 'done' make sense, but some are simply more formal, or grammatically correct, than others. Example: Is the turkey done? (Has the turkey completed cooking?) Ex: Are the cookies done? (Have the cookies completed baking?) Ex: are you done with that? (Have you completed that?)-- this is still works, but it's what we used to call "Lazy English": your point is made, but there's a more accurate way to say it. Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c3230

Why not sind Sie fertig damit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elisabeth_S

that would be correct, too, but it sounds a bit more colloquial.. couldn't say, why, though .. there probably is some weird rule ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nena5000

Would like to know why "are you ready for it" was marked as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoMan2

Which word stand for "that"? Or can anyone give a more direct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fritz41369

Da+mit=there+with->with that. It's like when you point at an object over there: 'that'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuaaL-Gml

Fertig? "ig" is "ich" not "eg"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyamkumarR

Would it be correct if I say "Sind Sie mit das fertig" just as a sentence in previous lesson (Sind Sie mot Der Arbeit fertig)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TorBerglund

»"Sie" is used as the formal "you" here, not as "they".«. How is it possible to discern this??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ankita493894

why is 'Damit" there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liu157

What the correct pronouceation of the word "fertig" ? Is it fer-ti-sh Or fer-ti-k?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidi815736

Like "Fer-ti-hhh"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fritz41369

It's neither, but 'fertik' is closer (to my ears, anyway).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hunorkerekes

Yes i understand that. Sie is formal you. But Sind???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HessamouS

Didn't know that "fertig" can also end with a 'k' like sound. Had to refer to the dictionary!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eeve1994

Is there a way to distinguish between the f and the v sounds? I keep having to cross my fingers and hope for the best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvelineF.

Why can i not say "are you ready with that "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HecklerGlo

Is it OK to speak as simply as "sind Sie mit es fertig?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSnow1

Does damit imply 'so that' as in 'er kocht damit wir essen können' and also 'with it' as in 'sind Sie damit fertig?'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkGrand

I was marked wrong for translating this as, "Are you ready for it? Is it wrong? The given translation is not a normal English construct: Are you ready with it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinibauz

What would be the purpose of this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob46196

Just curious about her pronunciation of fertig with a hard g sound like in garden. I thought the ig endings were supposed to be pronounced like ich. Or maybe the pronunciation varies by region? Anyone know?


[deactivated user]

    Sounds like she is talking to a cake.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vassiliavk

    'Sind Sie damit fertig'. 'Are they done with that' is marked as incorrect while 'Are you done with that' is marked as correct. Yet, the form is predicative I believe, so I don't get why third person plural for the "Sie" would be unacceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ankita493894

    why is 'Damit" there?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Math-Prof

    Could this also be "Are they done with that?"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andi133

    Its not Sind sie mit damit fertig? Where the with?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hailstorm1

    "Are you done damn it"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WisalCh

    why does damit mean already in this phrase?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WisalCh

    why does damit mean already here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

    'through' or 'done' means 'finished with'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jagerboy96

    What is the informal way to say this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vjcsxD

    So damit = da+mit = with that


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owe13

    Why is fertig "finished"? Every other time I've used this Its been "ready". I wish they'd say what the word MEANS then let the language twist like language does


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naomi431610

    Bist du fertig mit das? can you use that as an informal way of saying it..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oyoyo4

    fertig means both 'ready' and 'finished'. But in this sentence 'Sind Sie damit fertig?' only means 'finished' because it has 'damit'? Or can it mean 'Are you ready for it?' as well?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apsen

    Fertig also means ready so "Are you thus ready?" A bit awkward, but this is DuoLingo after all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rpratdesaba

    "Fertig" applies when you have finished something. "Bereit" is used when you are ready to start something.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trojax1

    why is it you and not they? how do you tell its the polite form?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TorBerglund

    »"Sie" is used as the formal "you" here, not as "they".« How is it possible to discern this??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinibauz

    What would be the purpose of this sentence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

    'finished' is the correct word not 'done' !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cristti

    Darum... Davor... Damit... What's with all this sh-t


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flossy6

    I think it is more usual to say "have" rather than "are"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schmetterling54a

    Are you done with that? Oh God, I have never seen such a sentence. Is this the really translation???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apebongo

    -Are you done with your plate? -Yes, you may remove it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flyingfinn123

    In the U.S. it is more common to hear "are you finished" than "are you through"

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