https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland

Seachtain na Gaeilge: Day 12

alexinIreland
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[This challenge is now closed]

Dia daoibh!

Welcome to Day 12 of the SnaG challenge. Today, we're doing something a bit different.

First, join me in congratulating the winner of yesterday's challenge: dancelmarie! Comhghairdeas!

Challenge 12 - Dúshlán 12

Today's challenge is to speak Irish!

  • Challenge: Speak!
  • Theme: Anything
  • Top Prize: 30 lingots (every entrant will also get 2 lingots!)

Record a short clip (audio file or video) of you speaking Irish. You can talk about whatever you want! Just deliver a short monologue. Here are some important things to note:

  • The winner will be chosen on the basis of accuracy, confidence and overall attempt.
  • Don't be afraid to make mistakes.
  • If you wish to make a video, the preferred site to share it on is YouTube. (Be aware that you can make the link private if you do not wish for it to be seen by the whole world, but note that anyone who clicks on the link can still view the video)
  • If you are under 13, you must ask for your parents'/guardians' permission before making and posting your entry
  • Since this challenge is a bit more difficult, you have until Sunday to post in your entries :)

Real World Mini-Challenge

Tweet as Gaeilge with the hashtags #SnaG2015, #duolingo and #Gaeilge!

I Want More

Fine by me:

Irish Song of the Day

"Pompeii" le Bastille as Gaeilge

Seanfhocal an lae

"Hold the phone, Alex. What's a seanfhocal?"

Well, quite simply, a seanfhocal is an Irish proverb. They are pretty fun to learn and I'll be teaching you one each day from now until the 17th! They are a nice way to decorate your speech and you will hear/see them used quite often. Today's seanfhocal is a personal favourite of mine:

Bíonn blás ar an mbeagán

Go n-éirí an t-ádh leat!

Bain triail aisti! Surprise yourself!

SnaG Day 11

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/heathermagoo
heathermagooPlus
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I recorded this on vocaroo (since that's what AlexisLinguist used for her Christmas message)

http://vocaroo.com/i/s1GuhGgadXR9

Chuaigh an mhuicín seo ar an aonach; D’fhan an mhuicín seo ag baile; Fuair an mhuicín seo arán is im; Ní bhfuair an mhuicín seo dada; ‘Bhíoc, bhíoc, bhíoc,’ arsa an bainbhín, ‘Tá ocras ormsa.’

This little pig went to market; This little pig stayed home; This little pig got bread and butter; This little pig got nothing; ‘Oink, oink, oink,’ said the piglet, ‘I’m hungry.’

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

Sounds good! I like how you rolled your r's. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heathermagoo
heathermagooPlus
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Whoa! Thank you. It would have been your perfect poem. I didn't think of that.

But I know you'll find something even better. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

couple of things about the writing (haven't listened to recording): an muicín - the dimunitive makes nouns masculine (hence cailín being masculine). I would say sa (m)b(h)aile for 'at home'. ag baile generally refers to town.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heathermagoo
heathermagooPlus
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Thanks for the comments. I always appreciate so much that you take the time and I always learn a lot!

In this case, the language may just be a little antiquated, since it's a nursery rhyme. I took the verse from Barbara Hillers' course p.96. http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~hillers/BUNTUS-summer.pdf You can see some of her sources on p.x

I wanted to read a poem, but didn't want to get so far beyond my skill level that I didn't have any idea what I was saying. "Oink" seemed about the right speed for me. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It could just be an Ulster thing as well, honestly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heathermagoo
heathermagooPlus
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I was just watching the wonderful video from ProinsiasOFoghlu (upvote)!!!

And the next video on the carousel was this awesome group.
They should enter the day 12 competition!

http://goo.gl/oNGk0h

You can see what makes the as Gaeilge covers so engaging for Irish learners.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackVMacK
JackVMacKPlus
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íoslódáil agam daoibh!

EDIT: heathermagoo reminds me that I should probably write out what I was trying to say.

Dia daoibh, a chairde. Bhí craic ar dóigh agam an Ghaeilge a foghlaim libh, agus táim ag dul a plé cor cainte a tháinig mé ar é le déanaí agus a shilim atá aoibhinn: "Mura (rud éigin), ní lá go maidin é". Ciallaíonn sé go rud éigin fíor ar fad. Cuireann cor na cainte seo mo sheanathair dom, mar deireadh sé "If that ain't good, then grits ain't groceries." Níl a fhios agam cén chaoi é aistriú díreach, ach tá an chuma orm go raibh siad cosúil.

Hello, everyone. I've had a lot of fun learning Irish with y'all, and I'm going to discuss a turn of phrase I came across recently and that I find delightful: "Mura (rud éigin), ní lá go maidin é." It means that (something) is very true. This idiom reminds me of my grandfather, because he used to say, "If that ain't good, then grits ain't groceries." I don't know how to translate it directly, but they seem similar to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I'm assuming the bold means you're stressing the word? Just so you know, in native Irish (Gaeltacht), they don't use stress for emphasis, instead choosing to use syntax to express it.

Mar shampla:

  • Tá mé ag léamh an labhair - I am reading the book.
  • (Is é) an labhar atá mé a léamh - I am reading the book.
  • (Is) mise atá ag léamh an labhair - I am reading the book.
  • (Is) ag léamh atá mé an leabhar - I am reading the book.

Also, if you want, I can correct what you have.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackVMacK
JackVMacKPlus
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Yes, that was my intent. And please do correct what I have - best way to learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Bhí spraoi ar ndóigh agam - spraoi would be better use of "fun" in this sense. craic is more like conversation and going out with people and chatting, having fun that way.

ag foghlaim (na) Gaeilge libh - assuming you meant to say "Learning Irish with you"

táim ag dul ag plé * - for "going to" it's ag dul ag* + VN + genitive object

ar ar tháinig mé le déanaí or ar tháinig mé le déanaí air - What you have here is an indirect relative clause, which uses ar in the past tense instead of a, like a direct relative clause. Because of it, you can move the ar to the front in positive statements, giving ar ar. Or, you can leave it, but you have inflect it for what you're talking about (ar é = air)

I mo thuairim, is aoibheann an cor cainte é - Basically, "In my opinion, it is a delightful idiom". This is an example of the fronting to stress adjectives. when you have it, you don't need the other pronoun between it. You could also say Sílim gur aoibheann an cor cainte é for "I think it's a delightful idiom" if you wanted (Síl/Ceap require reported speech)

Ciallaíon sé gur rud éigean fíor ar fad - Gotta use the copula, which makes it gur instead of go

Cuireann an cor cainte mo sheanáthair i gcuimhne dom - Cuir is gcuimhne do is "remind".

mar deireadh sé - Yay! You got the past habitual!

Níl a fhios agam cén chaoi a astrítear go díreach é - I don't how it one translates it - I don't know how it's translated, basically. You could also do Níl a fhios agam cén chaoi a aistreofaí go díreach é - I don't know how it would translate, etc. etc.

ach ceapaim go bhfuil siad comhcosúil (le chéile) - I just like ceap here (but I think that they are similar). Or, if you wanted to get fancy: ceapaim gur beag eatarthu (I think there's little (difference) between them).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackVMacK
JackVMacKPlus
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Go raibh céad míle maith agat! (...a ghalaxyrocker? How the devil would you make that vocative?) This is very helpful - as you can tell, I'm still at the stage where I'm calqueing* everything from English, and I'm having a hard time breaking out of it. So, many thanks for your corrections and comments.

If you wouldn't mind going a little further, there are a couple points on which you've corrected me and I'm still confused.

>...ag foghlaim na Gaeilge...

I will now take a hundred lines: I WILL REMEMBER THAT VERBAL NOUNS TAKE GENITIVE OBJECTS.

And yes, I did mean "y'all". I'm from North Carolina. I'm allowed.

>Táim ag dul ag plé...

... would be followed by coir if it stood alone, but here chor cainte, in what GnaG calls the functional genitive?

>(I mo thuairim, is/Sílim gur) aoibhinn an cor cainte é...

Two things here. First, why an cor cainte rather than cor na cainte? I thought with a definite genitive construction, the article was placed and declined with the final word of the construction?

Also, where would seo go here? Would it be an cor cainte seo é, or an cor cainte é seo?

>...ceapaim go bhfuil siad comhcosúil...

I was trying to take the agency off of myself, which is a striking example of abrogation of responsibility.

All seriousness, though, is there a construction that gets this sense across without placing a verb of opinion at the head of the sentence? I think the construction you've given is too assertive; I was trying to emphasize the tentativeness of my opinion about the similarity of the two idioms.

Again, many thanks for your feedback. I'll rework it, and possibly expand it, now that I have a better idea of what I'm doing syntactically; hopefully I'll have another recording up tonight.

*I like to verb words. Verbing weirds language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

And yes, I did mean "y'all". I'm from North Carolina. I'm allowed.

Ain't complainin'. I'm a Southerner myself.

would be followed by coir if it stood alone, but here chor cainte, in what GnaG calls the functional genitive?

That's my guess. I'm honestly not sure because cor cainte, as far as I understand, is no longer considered two words, but has become a single lexeme. So you could maybe say ag plé an coir cainte, but I'm not really sure.

Two things here. First, why an cor cainte rather than cor na cainte? I thought with a definite genitive construction, the article was placed and declined with the final word of the construction?

Put the an before it because, as far as I'm aware, it's considered a single lexeme, even though it takes two words (similar to ladybug, which is Bóín Dé).

Also, where would seo go here? Would it be an cor cainte seo é, or an cor cainte é seo?

An cor cainte é seo

I was trying to take the agency off of myself, which is a striking example of abrogation of responsibility.

I gotcha. That's my bad for misinterpreting. Based on this NEID sample:

it seems a bit of a bargain - tá cuma an dea-mhargaidh air

I say you can say Tá cuma comhchosúlachta orthu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bob1745

Sin smaoineamh iontach ar fad!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickman
magickman
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It's a shame I won't have time to record anything before this challenge is over, looks like a fun one. :)

I was planning on perhaps recording the first paragraph of 'An Hobad', as I just so happened to be practising reading it with an Irish-speaking friend last night.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickman
magickman
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Here is my entry. Thought I'd do the exercise for reading practice anyway. :) http://vocaroo.com/i/s1meXIyNVy9z

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidColli4
DavidColli4
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Hopefully ill have time. In anycase, thank you a lot for these days. It really helps to get me thinking even if i wont have time. Have a lingot!

3 years ago
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