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  5. "Léimid nuachtáin."

"Léimid nuachtáin."

Translation:We read newspapers.

March 12, 2015

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

Pronunciation - the last syllable in 'nuachtán' is pronounced like 'tawn'. The last syllable in 'nuachtáin' is pronounced like 'toyn'. Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Is nuachtáin slender (after palatizing ns.) because of the 'i'? That would explain the suggested pronounciation "toyn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

nuachtáin is a plural noun. It is neither broad nor slender.

The terminal n in nuachtáin is slender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyssahammerstein

These words are beautiful, but hard to remember the spelling!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMOliver71

I found songs on that free video app we all know(red, and starts witha "Y"), that are in Irish, with the words and translations on screen (like karaoke). It's helped my spelling to see the words as they are sung, pronunciation too! (Just make sure you search for "songs as Gaeilge" and watch that you're not watching Scottish language, it's similar but not the same. Watch for weird accent marks/fada. I learned that Irish accent marks only go one direction... so if you see words with fada in different directions, wait until later in your studies to listen to those. I almost confused myself! Lol)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuuranCo

Had a brain fart and put 'we eat newspapers' :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul138242

Whenever I try to learn a language, I almost always accidentally eat someone. One such example is in German;《Paul ist ein Hamburger》vs. 《Paul isst ein Hamburger》, which, to an American, is funny on wayyy too many levels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMOliver71

Giggling... I am getting tired, doing similar stuff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Thanks. I mostly meant that it would be nice when I'm learning new vocabulary, if the pronunciation were in the lesson. I think maybe two words in the plurals section were pronounced. Hard to remember what I can't hear. And hard to learn if I have to keep opening new windows to search pronunciation on another site.

But are "nuachtáin" and "nuachtán" pronounced differently? I can't tell from that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrumpyPian

I agree with you, in that I'm not sure of the difference in pronunciation of leabhar versus leabhair. Perhaps the difference is too subtle for nonnative speakers to hear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heinzgenrikh

The pronunciation of nuachtán and nuachtáin are different. The latter has a slender n while the former has a broad n.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

In classical singing, I was taught that the vowels o and u (broad) come from the back of the mouth and the i e (slender) from the front. Singing usually considers a to be in the middle, but - since it's broad in Irish - I would pronounce it from the back of the mouth, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcilio_mosco

From the audio, I really can't tell the difference as well. Maybe it is one of those subtle differences that one can't tell apart easily.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

http://pt.forvo.com/search/nuachtan/

Here it is ahn versus the plural ah-een, but it is very subtle as it is quickly said. I think you can hear the 'n' better in the plural, also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

The trouble with forvo is that it doesn't distinguish between dialects, so we might end ip with a mishmash :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMOliver71

Look outside Duolingo for "Gaeilge pronunciation". Videos from teachers and music with lyrics come up... plus a search sight https://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/Ithim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

I found this site extremely helpful for pronounciation rules: http://angaelmagazine.com/pronunciation/consonants.htm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DalenSinensis

Why is "We're reading newspapers" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In Irish, there is a separate verb form for the present continuous. I am not sure if this is correct, but I think it might be "Táimid ag léamh nuachtáin."

Here is a good explanation of the Irish progressive tense. http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelicGirl2

so how are the plurals made. so far some had an extra "a" and others an extra "i" male/female words? but somestimes the i was at the end and other times just near the end (syllable before) So are there rules ? and do they depend on certain nearby letters?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roni954998

When you accidentally say "We are newspapers"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roni954998

All normal people are newspapers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Go1rish

Why not "We read the newspaper?" " Léimid na nuachtán"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4
  • 1050

Because that would be "Léimid an nuachtán"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roni954998

I had a brain fart and said, "We butter newspapers"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuuranCo

For me the word 'nuachtan' sounds very much like the Sami language that is spoken in the northern parts of Finland and in parts of Norway and Sweden as well by the Sami people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leyla-Mich

I wrote "We read the newspapers" ... i don't like those exercises


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nirn15

I put ... nuachtán. Surely either is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1448

As this is an Irish to English exercise, and it doesn't have any audio, you have to type your answer in English, not in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nirn15

Surely either answer is correct in this instance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jos335399

It's not spoken so there's no pronuncation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jos335399

They don't sound when their not said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xX_Abby_Xx1

I put we read the newspapers thats gottta be right its the same meaning

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