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"C'est absolument hors de question."

Translation:That is absolutely out of the question.

3 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Pandamaci
Pandamaci
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So "this is absolutely out of question" is wrong! is out of THE question correct at all??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
georgeoftruth
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Yes. The English expression is "out of the question."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greatlanguages
greatlanguages
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Why is the French expression not "hors de la question?" I would like to understand the reason for just hors de. Thanks in advance.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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There is actually a simple answer. There is the French way and there is the English way. Just as in English, we say "it is out of THE question", the French express the same idea by saying "C'est hors de question". We must not force equivalent words to appear in a translation when they just don't work in the target language. "Out of the question" is an idiom; the concept is to be interpreted as a whole and not translated word for word. So not "outside of (the) question" or "beyond (the) question", etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awefulwaffle
awefulwaffle
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I'm not a native French speaker. That said, it seems "hors de question" is an idiomatic expression that does not use the definite article "la" before "question"

Larousse provides many examples of expressions using "hors" and "hors de"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geoffjball
geoffjball
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I'd like to know, too. Especially given the translation here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6090528

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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What is natural in one expression may not be natural in another. "Hors de la ville" would be the natural way to use it and it is idiomatic in that context, i.e., it is not that "hors de" is always used in a cookie-cutter kind of way and "hors de question" is the natural way "out of the question" is said in French. There is not always a word-for-word equivalence between languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parsamana
Parsamana
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still hasn't been fixed, it rejects "out of question"...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicola526448
Nicola526448
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We don't say 'out of question' in English. At least not in standard English. So you have to translate it to 'out of the question'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VioletteNoire
VioletteNoire
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Weird, I actually read that "out of question" exists, but it is not so used now as much because it has a different meaning, or something...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Native speaker here. I just can't think of any context where "out of question" would be used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NightKnight5

Here to me, it actually means, There's absolutely no way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peter.szabo
peter.szabo
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Well, Shakespeare does in his Twelfth Night.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Four hundred years ago....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArdeJohnson

What's the difference between:

  • hors \ dehors \ dehors de \ hors de \ en dehors de

  • près de \ auprès de \ près \ à peu près \ presque

  • sous \ dessous \ en dessous \ au-dessous \ au-dessous de

etc. etc. etc. etc. x_x? This is a little crazy; my list of prepositional and adverbial expressions is getting unmanageable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brock_keller
brock_keller
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I am a native English speaker and "out of the question" sounds weird and strange. I've never heard that before. It is said "out of question", that should not be marked wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcotonio

Weeeeeird, I've never heard "out of the question" before, too - but I googled it and apparently "out of question" is rare and unseen by most people on the Internet. I sense a crack in the matrix here... Can you tell me where you're from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tallguy007

I am the guy who started all of this. My English is UK based.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcotonio

Well, you both seem native, so it's not only my bias (I'm Brazilian and our equivalent to the expression [fora de questão] would translate as "out of question", without "the"). But ever since I commented this here I have been seeing "out of THE question" everywhere I look. I really feel like I was moved between alternate realities...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brock_keller
brock_keller
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Idaho, USA hahah

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMorgan833858

I've heard it plenty of times. I'm European so maybe it didn't make it to American English.

"Ma can I grab a snickers from the chippy?"

No son we'll have tea at home."

"BUT MAAAAAAAAAAAA"

"C'est absolument hors de question."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimmyR7

I thought "out of question " means "absolutely yes", while "out of the question " means "no way" or "absolutely no"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gita-ji
Gita-ji
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In Australia they would say that something is "out of THE question", never "out of question".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Wait, why is is hors and not dehors or en hors?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awefulwaffle
awefulwaffle
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Larousse online indicates that "hors" alone is now a litterary word, but "hors de" is a fixed or semi fixed expression:

  • Hors de ... On la trouve dans des expressions figées ou semi-figées comme hors d'affaire, hors d'âge, hors d'atteinte, hors de cause, hors de danger, hors de prix, etc.

Here are some sentences using "hors de":

  • C’est hors de question. = It’s out of the question.
  • Il est hors de danger. = He is out of danger.
  • Il s'est élancé hors de la pièce = He dashed out of the room.
  • Il était hors d'haleine (essoufflé) = He was out of breath.

Source of sentences: Grammaire comparative du français et de l'anglais à l'usage des anglophones, by Jean-Paul Tremblay

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Always looking for new reference works. Is the Tremblay book worth hunting down?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awefulwaffle
awefulwaffle
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I don't know the overall quality of the text. That excerpt is from the free ebook preview of the 1972 edition that looks like it was typed on a typewriter.

I did a g**gle search, and the title appeared on the catalogues of several university libraries, so you may be able to do an inter-library loan to review the text. The 2002 edition is a "recommended additional material" for a King's College, London evening language course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Thanks, I'll poke about. I just thought perhaps it was a reference book you had yourself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john_treehugger
john_treehugger
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Come to think of it, "out of range", "out of sight", "out of time", and "out of mind" are common usage English phrases, but one never ever says "out of question".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john_treehugger
john_treehugger
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To go the opposite way: In range, in sight, in time and in mind are possible constructions, but "in the question" is out of the question! One would have to say: "that is under consideration" or some such thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Indeed, something that is "in question" is dubious, not "under consideration".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MKDuolingo123

Isn't the English form "out of question"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john_treehugger
john_treehugger
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No, that is absolutely out of the question.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CathyLaRoc1

Native American speaker. "out of question" is what I would say. "out of the question" sounds wrong and forced.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobthedrummer

When duo says "C'est" with a liason like this, is it said "say+t..." or more like "set..." ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mach2.08
mach2.08
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Could definitely be accepted here instead of abolutely ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

It would be a possibility if you were just casually translating a casual conversation, but in this learning context it's generally best not to go searching for some other way of saying something relatively straightforward.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyU.

I have a similar question to @jacobthedrummer 's. Would "hors de" liaise with the 't' before it (if there wasn't already a liaison between the previous two words)? So, if the word absolument were not there, would "c'esT" liaise with "hors de"? Also, how do you decide which one to liaise when there are two opportunities in a sentence right after each other? Is it whichever is first or are there rules / guidelines?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

There is no liaison with "hors" because it begins with an "h aspiré".

I'm not sure I understand your other question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyU.

Thanks @DianaM. My other question was, in a sentence like "Vous avez assez poulet." Why is the liaison between vous+avez instead of avez+assez?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

It's not a matter of one rather than the other, it's just that some liaisons are required, some are forbidden and quite a few are optional.

The optional ones are the tricky ones, because some of them are still very common, while others are considered quite old-fashioned or very "high register", as they say (formal, snooty, somewhere in there). I gather that the general long-term trend is to use fewer and fewer liaisons (which I tend to think is a pity, but I don't actually get a vote - ha)

I don't pretend to be an expert, but as I understand it, liaison after "vous" is required, while liaison after verbs (other than être) is either forbidden or very, very formal.

Here are a couple of links that might help (Note that there are some differences of opinion about optionality among them. Sigh.)

http://www.lepointdufle.net/ressources_fle/liaisons_obligatoires_liaisons_interdites.htm#.UtN3KZ47ugI
http://ielanguages.com/blog/french-and-its-secret-liaisons/
http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons-o.htm

Oh, and "having enough" requires a "de" - I believe your sentence should read, "Vous avez assez de poulet."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyU.

Haha, thank you so much for your response. As always, it was extremely helpful!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PetonV
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theoretically, you should pronounce both: "vous z-avez z-assez de poulet". But people who are using a more casual register will say "vous z-avez assez de poulet"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tallguy007

"It is totally out of question" why is this not accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awefulwaffle
awefulwaffle
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Duo teaches transparent words. "absolutely" and "absolument" are the closest match.

"It is totally out of the question" is grammatically correct. Outside of Duo, in real life, you would be understood if you said that.

In my area of N. America that sentence is used equally with "totally" and "absolutely". However, if you want to add emphasis by stressing vowels, you can only elongate the "o" in "tooootally", while you can add more stress in "absolutely", for example, "aaabsofrigginluuutely". (Be aware that stressing vowels that way is extremely casual. Don't try it at the office with your boss!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CathyKimball

This may be a little off base here but I am wondering what the word for word translation for "hors d'oeuvre" would be in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tony713682
Tony713682
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why is this is not acceptable. Just another glitch in the programming???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tony713682
Tony713682
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I see no answer for why this cannot be used

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HowardWigg

That is absolutely out of the question. Exclamation mark!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobo924574
Jacobo924574
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it's absolutely OUT OF QUESTION

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PapaSmurf88
PapaSmurf88
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No, I won't sing and dance for you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dshoup40

I took a different approach, "It is absolutely outside the question." The thought being that the response referenced doesn't relate to the question. I think I was thinking of dehors, but my Barron's Dictionary does give the first definition of "hors" as "outside". Any thoughts?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CSA_GW
CSA_GW
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while "hors de question" means "out of THE question" in English, can anyone tell me what French phrase is for "out of question" please? Thanks

I hope there is something different from "ne pas de problem".

1 year ago