"Nous allons à la boulangerie."

Translation:We are going to the bakery.

March 13, 2015

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konim96

Can I also say "Nous allons au boulangerie"?

April 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

All shops ending in -rie are feminine: à la boulangerie, à la boucherie, à la mercerie, à la droguerie...

April 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konim96

Oh, so I only use au when it is masculine? Merci beaucoup! :D

April 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Yes, "au" is the contraction of à+le

April 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aadrita__

À+la=à la À+le=au À+les=aux

March 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gigi_Forever

Awesome!! Merci beaucoup!

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdouardC2020

Now I unserstand. Thank you.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaureenMou

we are going to the bakers also has the same meaning - why is it marked incorrect

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

we are going to the baker's = nous allons chez le boulanger

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

The issue being pointed out is that English speakers interchangeably use "baker(s)" and "bakery". We do the same with barber, tailor, etc. The profession often stands for the location as well.

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1807

The correct term is "the baker's", "the barber's", "the tailor's"; not "the bakers", etc.

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

And the singular version? "I'm going to the barber," is perfectly fine in English.

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1807

Of course you can say that but you are confusing what you could say with what the translation is. "...going to the barber" does not back-translate to "aller au salon de coiffure", nor does "...going to the baker" back-translate to "aller à la boulangerie".

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColeRaney

In these instances, the -s does not mark plural in English 's marks possesive. "The barber's" is short for "The barber's place"

May 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElsieJune

But if you use the possessive, it would have to be baker's followed by another word, such as shop. You cannot just end with baker's

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1807

The Oxford French Dictionary allows that "boulangerie" may be translated as "the bakery" or "the baker's" (not "the bakers"). Sitesurf's reference to "chez le boulanger" is more precise regarding "the baker's".

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedPanda892567

It's we are going to the bakery.

March 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonOosterman

it should not be marked incorrect because a boulangerie is also a baker's shop and that is not called a bakery

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1807

The Oxford French Dictionary lists boulangerie as "bakery" or "the baker's" as meaning a store. Either is acceptable. Both terms refer to the store (magasin) where baked goods are made on the premises. I cite the dictionary here so you know that I am not just making things up as I go along.

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Dosheva

Can anyone please explain to me what the difference between 'à la' and 'au' is? Thanks in advance!

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The rules are the same for "du, de la" as for "au, à la".

Only the masculine "à+le" has to contract to "au", just as "de+le" contracts to "du".

In plural "à+les" contracts to "aux" in the same way as "de+les" contracts to "des".

  • Je vais au marché --- Je viens du marché
  • Je vais à la boulangerie --- Je viens de la boulangerie
  • Je vais aux puces --- Je viens des puces (feminine plural = flee market)
August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Dosheva

Thank you very much!

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoemiDzu

I find it difficult to distinguish between "allons" and "sommes" , i keep forgetting which one to use,,, any tips ?

June 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinCanuck

can you distinguish between "we are" and "we are going"?

August 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/traptrackstar

I thought "to go" could also be translated with "vais/vas/va" Je vais a la boulangerie? Or is allons the plural form of vais, vas, & va? SO MUCH LANGUAGE

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinCanuck

yup je vais / tu vas / il va/ nous allons / vous allez / ils vont

August 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittyPhat

Are there two ways of spelling Bakery in french? I input "Boulaungerie" (notice the extra 'u') and it was marked as spelled correctly.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Tsk tsk... Duolingo is becoming lenient... "boulangerie" is the only spelling.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shahrzad.n9

i just miss "i" in going? :(

July 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reinierpf

So what is wrong about: we are going to the baker's store

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

It's just not how we say it in English.

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kzshy

I am not sure translating the boulangerie to the bakery would be a great idea...«dépôt de pain(s)», or « pain(s)» is also the bakery. The boulangerie is a narrower notion.

February 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

"To the baker's" meaning "to the bakery" is a time-honoured English expression. The two constructions are interchangeable. If there were a distinction in my mind, it would be this: in a supermarket that stocks bread and pastries, but does not bake in the store, I would ask to be directed to "the bakery" (even though they don't bake!) or more likely, to "the bread section". In the High Street, I would look for "the baker's" - whether or not he bakes all his own bread. The real "bakery" is probably on some soulless trading estate five miles from town. I'd never have reason to go there...

The boulanger probably still makes all his own breads. In a globalised world, some things are still sacred. Maybe it's just my rose-tinted specs.

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ian116730

The drop down gives baker's (uk) .Scotland is in uk we say it but duo disagrees with even itself

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1807

You must use an apostrophe (baker's), not "bakers", if that was the issue. Baker's is accepted.

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GVCHc2

Is there no liason between allons and à to have the "z" sound?

December 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The liaison between "nous" and "allons" is required, but the one between "allons" and "à" is optional.

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathleenMi708896

What's the difference between aller and vais? They both mean to go but in different ways? I always thought vais was to have but its used in bot situations in duolingo...

January 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blake450382

"aller" is the infinitive form of "to go", while "vais" is the "je" form of "to go". "Vais" never means "to have".

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleppanen

I used boulangerie in my translation. We also use this word in US, not as frequently, but still we know it so it should be accepted.

February 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

Regardless of how common it is in everyday English speech (it isn't at all), it's still a French word. If you use it in English, it's understood that you're using a French word to stand in for "bakery." Similarly, you can't translate the Spanish word "amigo" as "amigo" in English.

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary744926

Why a la instead of au? Such frustrating inconsistencies

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

Because "au" is only a contraction of "à le," not "à la." This was addressed in more detail in a comment above on the same question.

February 23, 2019
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.