"Tem quartos vagos?"

Translation:Are there vacant rooms?

August 27, 2013

63 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/nateg_2013

If spare is a recommended translation for vago, then why is "Do you have spare rooms?" not accepted?

August 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jackit

Similar with "empty". My guess is that what the Portuguese mean when they say use "vago" to describe a room is "vacant". My instinct says they'd more likely say "quarto extra" for "spare room" and "quarto vazio" for "empty room".

August 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

That's right! But "spare" can also be "reserva", like a spare tire (um pneu reserva). Reserva because it's reserved to be used when bad things happen to the main one.

September 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/TereMrdg

it is accepted now!

January 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/bonito_burrito

not anymore :/

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sophiesnail

Have you got instead of Do you have is not wrong!

November 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/a22brad22

"Have you got" is technically incorrect grammar, despite it being occasionally used in normal speech.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RomaRRio

Why not têm? quartos vagos is plural

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot

It is a special construction/exception, whenever "tem" means "there is" or "is there",it is always used in the singular.

January 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sophiesnail

I think because 'tem' is referring to the person who has the rooms, not the rooms themselves- Do you have...

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

The formal way would require verb "haver" (always conjugated in third person singular when it means "existir"): "Há quartos vagos?". But verb "ter" is much more used in this sense and is the first choice in a conversation. I'm not sure if it is a sentence without a subject or if it is a sentence with a hidden subject.

February 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mandolinera

Is there another word in portuguese for vagos In Spanish it means rascals

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Vagos = disponíveis = desocupados. But don't worry, "vago" has no bad connotations in Portuguese. Maybe the Spanish word corresponds to the Portuguese "vagabundo".

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

It doesn't actually mean rascals, it IS short for vagabundos and varies from "bums" to lazy. Vago in Spanish originally meant imprecise, as in English. Spanish and Portuguese are not the same, despite trading words across borders for 400 years..

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Well, "vago" also means imprecise in Portuguese, too.

Actually, you can hear "vago" or "vagabo" meaning "vagabundo" in Brazil, but only as a slang.

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

Vagabond (english) and Vagrant (english), etymology given as both latin and norse words for "wander(er)."

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Romulo.Np

'' Are there any rooms available?''

November 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianL51

I would have thought "You have vacant rooms?" should be accepted.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

Don't think; know. "You have?" is not proper English; it's short for "Do you have...?" If DuoLingo doesn't accept all sorts of Proper English, don't expect it to accept apocopated slang. Reaqd the whole thread from the top.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vioguy

Do we use ´tem´for when we are talking in a respectful and plural way, such as Voces tem quartos vagos? What do we say when using ´tu´? Tenes quartos vagos???

April 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Surely there are more polite ways of saying it, but "vocês têm quartos vagos" is perfectly acceptable.

Verb "ter" conjugation (presente do indicativo):

Eu tenho

Tu tens (In your question it would be: (Tu) Tens quartos vagos?).

Ele/Você tem

Nós temos

Vós tendes

Eles/Vocês têm (don't forget the circumflex accent. I know some keyboards make it difficult to use).

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu

It may be worth adding that "tem" and "têm" do not share the same pronunciation in European Portuguese as you can hear in this video: https://youtu.be/TYpGQmVeneE?t=144

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianL51

Yes, I'm learning European Portuguese and my teacher has us saying "teymh", or "tey-eymh" with the circumflex (forgive my home-made phoneticisms). When I worry about learning the "wrong" things by practising with Duolingo, most native speakers say not to worry because my accent will always be so bad that it will not matter whether I think I'm speaking Brazilian or European Portuguese. Sadly, I'm afraid that's almost certainly true :-) Especially if I model my diction on the Duolingo soundbites :-)

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

Well.... I just met a lady at a waterfall the other day.

I was talking to her incredibly naturally.... and then she told me she was from the United States.

I said "what?". Her Portuguese was definitely perfect.

Six years, she said.

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

That's very interesting, Davu.

Actually, it is possible to hear a "long" E sound in "têm" when a brazilian speaker wants to show undoubtly that is plural (sounds similar to "vêem" of verb "ver"). But in the everyday spoken language they have the same pronunciation in Brazil.

If I had to write what it sounds like in European Portuguese, I would probably try something near "tenhem". Probably its origin has something to do with subjunctive form "tenham".

I would like to point out that in the linked video the teacher says that "você(s)" pronoun is used for formal situations. It is very important to remember this is not true in Brazil, where "você(s)" is the familiar pronoun in most regions. In formal situations we use "o senhor" or "a senhora". In the given DL sentence: "O senhor tem quartos vagos?" or "A senhora tem quartos vagos?".

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoScope

I learned the same from my Brazilian teacher.

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoScope

Well, not the exactly the same. There is a difference but a lot more subtle. In têm you kind of pronounce the e two times, but really fast so it is almost the same as one e, but there is still a difference.

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu

Adriano, your point about formality is an interesting one. In EP there are three degrees of formality for singular you: "tu", "você" and "o senhor/a senhora", but only two for plural you. I think the teacher was only talking about the difference between "tu" and "você" and she would use "vocês" just as you do in Brazil for any situation that doesn't call for "os senhores/as senhoras".

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

I'm not sure about that. Years ago I was chating with a portuguese woman and we started do talk about the differences in our language. I remember she mentioned that we brazilians sound very formal using "você" for a friend.

Would you say that european "você" stays somewhere between brazilian "você" (similar to their "tu") and "o senhor" (equal in both versions)?

Maybe it is of interest to know that in Brazil regions where "você" is the rule, using "tu" sounds kind of old fashioned or poetic.

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu

Adriano, this paper:

http://web.uri.edu/iaics/files/09ana.pdf (just skip to the conclusion for the short version)

may answer your question. It covers many interesting points about the formality and politeness of the "you" words on both sides of the Atlantic.

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Muito obrigado, Davu! Acabei de ler e realmente é bem esclarecedor. (Thank you very much, Davu! I've just read it and it is certainly quite clarifying).

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vioguy

Thank you very much. The circumflex is only for plural (voces/eles) right?

April 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Yes. Você/ele/ela tem. Vocês/eles/elas têm. It is what we call "acento diferencial". It's there only to make written words clearer. There is no changing in the sound.

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vioguy

What is vós? When do we use it?

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu

It's the Portuguese 2nd-person plural subject pronoun (plural you). It is rarely used in modern Portuguese and "vocês" is used instead. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_personal_pronouns#V.C3.B3s

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipBro6

This was a "type what you hear" exercise for me. The audio has no interrogatory intonation and yet "There are vacant rooms." was counted as incorrect. I reported it as "the audio does not sound natural"

June 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lucai82

I clicked "Tem" and it means "Has", but it's not accepted as a correct answer. Instead, it'll accept "Are There". Which is correct?

October 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee

I've noticed that if it's "Ele tem quartos vagos" it's translated as "He has vacant rooms", but if it's just "Tem quartos vagos" then it's translated as "There are empty rooms".

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

good note! W/o subject Tem usually = Há, there is/are

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

Have you empty rooms was wrong Por que?

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

It would be unusual to ask about empty rooms. It brings to mind a room devoid of furniture. "Available rooms" is the term associated with hotels in AmE.

http://6abc.com/religion/hotels-say-plenty-of-rooms-available-for-pope-visit/944386/

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

because the machine isn't smart enough to recognize all options -- much work to be done yet.

June 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sueli Angst

Do you have?

May 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

I believe the possibility of using "do you have/have you got" here is an exception. The verb "ter" usage is kind of confusing. In this case, it is not about posession. Here it is used in verb "haver" place and the meaning is exactly "there is/are", but similarly to verb "haver" it is conjugated always in the third person singular. Compare to "Tem muitos hóspedes no hotel". In this case "Do you have" is not suitable. "Tem quartos vagos?" or even better "Você tem quartos vagos?" (meaning "Do you have/ Have you got any rooms available") would fit only if the person who is saying it were talking to a hotel employee or to the hotel owner.

May 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GerarddeSo

"Are there vacant quarters?" was marked wrong

June 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

Very recondite. DuoLingo has a hard time keeping up with normal, conversational English, without asking it to recognize old-fashioned language as well.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

'quarters' is still used in military. So it may be specialized, but it's not necessarily old-fashioned.

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

I thought that"tem"==is there or there is. Ha==there are or are there, am I correct

July 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mgaristova

No; it's all the same. Both "tem" and "há" can be used equally either for "there is" or for"there are". In fact, the number (singular or plural) doesn't matter. I think "há" is just more formal.

July 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/classik

I wrote " Are rooms vaccant ".. Marked me wrong.. Am I ?

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

= Os quartos estão vagos?

December 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoScope

It misses a word. But "Are there rooms vacant?" should be correct.

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoScope

It accentuates the being vacant of the rooms a bit more in my opinion. Like " Are there rooms that are vavant".

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoScope

"vacant" I ment

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JFSPA

The solution suggested to me, "Do you have any empty room?," is absolutely not correct usage. "Are there vacant rooms" is the way you'd ask it, I suppose, if you were worried about there being vacant / abandoned rooms in a building that you were buying, or living in, because the vacancy was potentially problematic. It's not a way you'd normally ask to rent space in a building, or rent a hotel room.

Correct options should include,

Do you have any empty rooms / Do you have any vacant rooms (in the US, these are both a bit stilted, especially the first, but not incorrect)

Do you have an empty room / do you have a vacant room (ditto)

Are there vacancies Do you have any vacancies Do you have a vacancy (all used)

Do you have availability (this is the term used by hotels; "let me check if we have availability," "yes, we have availability for tonight / for next week / for your dates")

Are there rooms available (used)

Do you have space available / is there space available (this would be the most normal way to ask for business rental space in a commercial setting, as opposed to, say, a hotel or appartment)

Do you have units available Are there units available (condo, appartment, as opposed to hotel or commercial space)

Do you have a spare room / do you have spare rooms / are there spare rooms (in a shared housing situation, looking to become a housemate)

Do you have a room Do you have rooms (all used, often in a context where it's already clear what the time frame is, or with that detail added: we're passing through for a night, do you have a room? Our business needs overflow space until the convention in May--do you have rooms?)

Completely understandable and used, but maybe too informal for Duolingo:

Do you have anything free [for tonight / for next week] (used)

Do you have anything (totally normal, in a context where the time-frame is already clear. "The airline stranded us, do you still have anything for tonight?" "No, we don't have anything.")

A note on "free": Are there rooms free Do you have rooms free Do you have a free room [for tonight] (these were probably the single most common way to ask, until some people intentionally / joking misconstrued the meaning of "free" to mean "no payment needed.")

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

"Are there vacant rooms" is the solution suggested now. At least, this is what I'm reading right now in my screen. .. The problem here, I think, is the confusion about verb "ter". In the given sentence, it means "existir" and should be translated to "there is/are". For example: in brazilian Toy Story version, Woody says "Tem uma cobra na minha bota!" (for There's a snake in my boot). .. And about the interesting text you posted, I believe nearly all those options you listed have a corresponding variant in Portuguese.

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

have you vacant rooms is the same as you have vacant rooms==my answer is correct in English

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/EirlynJenk

I agree. That's what I put and it was marked wrong.

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

But DL doesn't speak English OR Portuguese; it's a machi9ne set up to recognize a number of common phrases with +/- equivalent meanings. Always go for the more literal, colloquial option and 95% of the time DL will recogn ize it.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/lex1517

One note...have you got is totally improper English. The question is "do you have vacant rooms" or "have you (any) vacant rooms but never have you got. Just has you would say, "I have a room" Not, I got a room. Got is one word that is rarely ever proper in English but many people use it. Have and got are essentially the same word meaning possession. Have you got would be akin to saying Have you have.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Raymond704692

As a native English speaker I have got to speak up for "got". It is the past tense and participle of "get" which is a lovely Old English word. It has several meanings and the language would be diminished without it.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Swan's Practical English Usage: "the usage of "have" without the auxiliary "do" or without the verbal "have got" is very formal British English only."

Has your sister got a car? - informal
Does your sister have a car?
Has your sister a car? - formal BrE, not used in AmE

ngrams - Corpus of English http://tinyurl.com/jnz6apu

May 12, 2016
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