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  5. "Cat mo mhic."

"Cat mo mhic."

Translation:My son's cat.

March 14, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/__fra___

I don't understand how you can distinguish between " the cat of my son" and "a cat of my son" if you don't use an?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling
  • “The cat of my son” = “My son’s cat” = Cat mo mhic (genitive)
  • “A cat of my son” = Cat do mo mhac (dative)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conor.raff

interesting... have you a link for this so I can add to my bookmarks, cheers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conor.raff

Sorry, I meant any references for the case where the dative replaces the genitive when specifically used with a noun sans definite article, as per "a cat of my son". And thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

“My quarter of the apple” is only mo cheathrú den úll, not mo cheathrú an úill.

Blas an úill is “the taste of the apple”; blas den úll is “a taste of the apple”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

See here — look for “partitive dative”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conor.raff

Go raibh maith agat, A shcilling!

Yes, I can see here how the indefinite article + noun can be considered partitive, so it fits this scheme.

Also it seems from this reference as if the partitive dative is also a possible subtitute for the the partitive genitive, when the first noun is definite?.....

my quarter of the apple = mo cheathrú an úill = mo cheathrú den úll ?

However the dative can only replace the genitive in the partitive aspect?

the taste of the apple = blas an úill != blas den úll

where "!=" means "is not equal to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danubir

Using a plural form to denote singular genetive and a singular form to denote plural genetive is completely crazy! :-) No wonder Vikings went berserk in Ireland. Don't blame them. I am about to go berserk myself! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

Me being pedantic: one uses the singular genitive here, not the plural nominative. It just happens to be the same as the plural nominative... (in this and admittedly so many other circumstances)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conor.raff

"mac" is of the first declension

http://www.nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/nouns.php?teanga=

confirmed by the dictionary, which also shows its masculine...

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/gram/mac

rules for first declension are here

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm

so far, "mac" nom. sing. has modified to "mic" gen. sing. Now final rule: possessive pronoun "mo" causes lenition / eclipsis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The noun class (gender) of mac is masculine, not male.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conor.raff

point taken, will change


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Verd-Lupo

Could it also be: cat de chuid mo mhic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Verd-Lupo

My friend Panu suggested: "Cat do mo mhac" means more like "a cat for my son" What thinkest y'all?

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