1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Bhíomar ag fanacht theas."

"Bhíomar ag fanacht theas."

Translation:We were staying in the south.

March 15, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SetLikeJelly

Any reason why waiting is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

You lenite it in infitive structures, if there's an object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyRyTheMagicGuy

July 10th, 2016, "We were waiting south" is accepted as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I keep seeing ó dheas meaning "to the south, southewards" and ó thuaidh meaning "to the north, northwards". But the word ó itself means "from". This is very confusing. Can anyone offer an explanation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

There are some brief explanations in the discussions for Tiomáineann an carr ó thuaidh and "The police officer ran south".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeMalone372235

How is she pronouncing the "th" in theas, sounds like a "t" to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Are you getting mixed up by the t in fanacht?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

"We were staying down south" should be accepted, no? I'm sure I've seen "up north" as the suggested translation for a similar sentence with thuaidh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizKerrey

A previous sentence used 'i ndeisceart' for 'in the south'. Could that be used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

You could use sa deisceart.

Where deisceart is used as part of a genitive phrase ("the south of England" - desiceart Shasana, "the south of France" - deisceart na Fraince), there is no definite article before deisceart, so you get i ndeisceart Shasana. But where an deisceart is used on its own, then i combines with an to give you sa.

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.