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  5. "The guests bring sheets."

"The guests bring sheets."

Translation:Gästerna tar med sig lakan.

March 16, 2015

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/datzysve

Why is it not "Gästarna tar med DEM lakan"? In other sentences I have seen "tar med oss" "tar med dig". Why is it here "SIG" instead of "DEM"? Thanks :)

Ok I got two negative votes, but no answer ... :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Good question, I've upvoted you and I'll answer :). It's because ta med sig is a reflexive verb and sig is the reflexive particle. It goes like this:
Jag tar med mig
Du tar med dig
Han/hon tar med sig
Vi tar med oss
Ni tar med er
De tar med sig

So as you can see, dem is never used in this verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WeraC

Hi, could you please explain the difference between "ta med sig" and "ha med sig"? I'm taking the course from Spanish to Swedish and there aren't exactly many people answering in those forums. I have already read some answers from the English-Swedish forum and searched in other places but I think I'm now a little lost between the exact meaning of each verb since they appear very similar to me. Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I would generally consider them interchangeable. There are some nuances, as in e.g. that you can ha med dig things unconsciously, but not typically ta med sig.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevro

How would one say "the guests take the sheets with them"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

I'd say Gästerna tar med sig lakanen. The definite form makes the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlorbik

I guess you have to specify when. That English sentence implies taking the sheets when they leave. Gästerna tar lakanen med sig när de lämnar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

I want to point out that we normally don't use lämnar without an object. I mean, people sometimes do that in more casual language, but it's still not considered totally correct by many speakers. We recommend saying åker instead in a sentence like yours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malgosia007

My answer, "Gästerna tar med lakan", was accepted. Does this sound OK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaplein

Is "Gästerna tar lakar med sig" not an acceptable word order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

It’s okay I’d say, but the given one is much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaplein

Thanks! Just asking because it's not accepted by the system. But if it's not very good don't add it! :-) So in general verb complete with particles first and then object, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Often it’s perfectly normal with pronouns but not so good with nouns if you do it your way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

You have a typo though, it should be lakan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarkJensen21

Is lakan singular or plural? Is it an ett word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, yes, and yes. :)

It's an ett-word, and like many other ett-words, it has the same form in singular and plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GodiSandra

• Gästerna tar med sej lakan. • Gästerna tar med sig lakan. Why "SEJ"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Mej/dig/sej are alternative forms of mig/dig/sig that are uncommon but accepted. They were introduced a few decades ago to move the spelling closer to actual spoken Swedish, but never caught on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GodiSandra

Thanks! What about "ej"? You've said "actual spoken" does it mean that later "mig/dig/sig" were pronounced differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

The spelling of mig/dig/sig is archaic, since that was more what they were pronounced 200 years ago.

The word "ej" is not of this category. It's an alternative to "inte", with the same function exactly, but with a much more formal tone to it. It's very rarely used except maybe on signs telling you what not to do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrLeopold

Isn't "sheet" a synonym for "paper"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, it'll usually refer to a sheet of paper but they're not synonymous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrLeopold

Right, it's a sheet of paper. This is all very confusing for me since I'm not native English :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

In this case, it's a bedsheet. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusabAlmaw

What about "hämtar laken"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, hämta means "fetch", and laken means "the brine" or "the burbot". :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bellaby

Fetch the brine! This amused me greatly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusabAlmaw

But I am sorry, I don't see a big difference between fetch and bring in this case, I am in Sweden and the people usually use hämtar in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, hämta means that you retrieve something from one place and bring it somewhere else.

ha/ta med sig only refers to the bringing part, not to the retrieving part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigswedeej

I typed har med instead of tar med. It was accepted. Help. Im confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The Swedish verb for "bring" is ta med sig, but ha med sig is a common way of expressing "have with oneself" - meaning the same thing as "bring".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenWat314748

Having not seen this construction before, I translated tar med sig as takes with them(selves), which in English suggests that something is being taken away, not brought with. How does one say that something is being taken away in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

We use tar med sig for that as well, but if the context isn't clearly defined, we'd usually add something - like tar med sig hem or tar med sig därifrån.

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