"Thug sé lámh dom."

Translation:He gave me a hand.

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Thank you, Thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyHaich
AyHaich
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Unfortunately, it was not his to give.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cullen45967
Cullen45967
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Is this actually the idiom in Irish, or just a borrowing from English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Dinneen has

{@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}láṁ do ṫaḃairt fá, to put a hand to, aid in;

and eDIL has (in definition III (h) there)

do-beir láim la helps

Do-beir was the older independent third-person singular present conjugation of tabhair, láim was an older spelling of lámh, and la was an older spelling of le, so effectively tugann sé lámh le X with the meaning of “he gives a hand to X” = “he helps X” is an old Irish idiom. I don’t know if English influence caused the replacement of le in the idiom with do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

"Can I give you a hand with that?" "He gave me a hand with it".

Without more examples, I wouldn't assume that Dineen didn't actually mean "helps with" rather than just "helps".

"A helping hand" (lámh chuidithe or lámh chúnta) seems to be more common in Irish than just "a hand".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That was the only related part in Dinneen’s definition of {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}láṁ, so I can’t say whether one or the other was the intended defintion.

The English-Irish Phrase Dictionary offers (in its “help” entry)

to give him a h. hand. {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}láṁ ċaḃarṫa do ṫaḃairt leis.

using the verbal adjective of cabhair. (Its “hand” entry pointed to the “help” entry for this meaning.)

The eDIL entry above is the oldest related idiom that I’d found. Its examples show that le X is used to designate the people being helped rather than the task for which help is desired.

2 years ago
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