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"Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland."

Translation:Poblacht na hÉireann agus Tuaisceart Éireann.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amcm96
amcm96
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"Éire is ainm don Stát nó, sa Sacs-Bhéarla, Ireland." Or so the Constitution says.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Republic of Ireland” is the description of the State, per The Republic of Ireland Act 1948, rather than the name of the State.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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So the term "Republic of Ireland" is defined as "Poblacht na hÉireann" ?

My OCD part would protest against improper translation of genitive, with the "na" missing in the English translation. However, if this is a fixed definition, then this use is explained.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Republic of Ireland” is translated as Poblacht na hÉireann rather than defined as it. It’s not an improper translation; Irish requires the (feminine genitive singular) article to be there before Éireann, and English requires the article to not be there before “Ireland”.

The texts of the Act can be found here (English) and here (Irish).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

English requires "The" in most cases where the phrase is used as a noun - "we visited the Republic of Ireland", "The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland both qualified for EUFA 2016", "Exports from the Republic of Ireland to the UK include bananas".

The only time that I can think of that "the" isn't required is when "Republic of Ireland" is used as an adjective, rather than a noun "Republic of Ireland fans made a good impression".

The English sentence in this particular exercise seems incomplete to me, even ignoring the issue of whether you're translating a sentence from Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I entirely agree with you — English in most cases requires the definite article before “Republic” in “Republic of Ireland”. My point was that English doesn’t require it before “Ireland”, which is where the article is located in the Irish translation, addressing Balleygawley’s point about the “improper translation of genitive”, where the genitive Éireann is preceded (and mutated) by the genitive article. Note that the English text of §2 of the Act has “the Republic of Ireland” rather than “The Republic of Ireland”, excluding the article from the description; therefore the “the” before “Republic” has been added to accommodate English grammar.

This exercise is certainly an incomplete sentence — since it has no verb, it’s only a noun phrase.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indicosa
Indicosa
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Which is the difference between Éire and Éireann?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Éire is the nominative (standard form) and Éireann is the genitive (form indicating e.g. ownership, with either " 's " or "of" in English).

So "The Republic of Ireland" is "Poblacht na hÉireann" and "Ireland" is "Éire".

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/gram/%c3%a9ire

3 years ago