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"El niño come pan."

Translation:The boy eats bread.

5 years ago

147 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/fatcatt316

"El niño come pan" also means "The boy eats bread".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NanneyGoat

How are we suppose to know which one is which?! There the same sentence!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suzettel

El without the ascent means the

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clbull
Clbull
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Él usually means 'he' rather than El which is 'the.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

CIBULL- not usually but always.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fedde96
Fedde96
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You must mark both (Y)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OscarEduar536113

Exactly, always He is equal to Él whit accent, because is a pronoun. And The is equal to El whiout accent, because is a determinant article

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarilynEve

Just learned something. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegeta181029

Same here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelechi652940

Thank you for that

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chikuela

I speak spanish You are correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariannRoc2

I speak alot spanish i dont even know why am doin that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/musickluvr

Ahhhhh, got it! Thanks for clearing that up, I was wondering the same thing!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaurisreenidhi

Here, in duolingo, if there r multiple answers for a single Q, you have to write only one. After its correct, in the green box it comes as “ another translation is ___ ”

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elijah0003

its says nino, not nina. child is the same as boy in this sentece

4 years ago

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niño = male child or boy.

niña = female child or girl.

Note than boys and girls and children.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cribbit_

Niño can also mean children I believe ;)

4 years ago

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No "niños" = children.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marogers

I'm wondering the same thing ... Maybe she says the El with the accent slightly differently than the El without the accent. I'm new at this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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"el" without accent = the.

"él" with accent = he.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

NanneyGoat, put either one, duo doesn't care. i put the boy which duo accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aundrea623364

ya what a bunch of help

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gustavo34265

Lambri

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesrusse922938

Thats what i just said. I thought i got it right.

:-(

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wbrown013

OK! Then why did I get marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fedde96
Fedde96
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You must mark both (Y)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaurisreenidhi

Yes. Niño and niña can also be called child

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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You're right, why people vote down?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gustavo34265

Doido

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brayden239359

No der

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awesomedude4901

That is what it says.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Monicabc

"The boy eats bread" is the correct translation

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libby610596

how come como doesn't have an 's' at the end? I assumed it was 'eat' whoops

1 year ago

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Please, ask your question only once. You have your reply on your other message, I hope it'll make it more clear for you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pup
pup
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niño means boy, child, and young.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanda2awesome

where are you from?????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pup
pup
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"El niño come pan." also means "the child eats bread" child referring to a boy

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balarko24

nino means both boy and child, so 2 answers are correct here.

5 years ago

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niño = male child only. /boy
niña = female child only. /girl

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libby610596

how come 'como' doesn't have an 's' at the end? I assumed it was 'eat' whoops

1 year ago

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Because each language has its own conjugation. In English, you add a "s" for he/she/it when it's simple present, in Spanish you add a "s" for "tú".

So (yo) como = I eat. (tú) comes = you eat (singular "you"), and (él/ella) come = he/she/it eats.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyPaul

El niño come pan. = The boy OR child eats bread.

If someone said that to me how would I know if they meant child or boy? Or does niño mean male child and niña mean female child.

For a language so set on giving everything a gender I'm confused how there possible can possibly confusions (if that ironically makes sense :)).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robinj77

In this example as it's the definite article it would be probably be okay to assume that it means "the boy". Also you will normally be able to infer the meaning from the conversation. This doesn't bother me too much as we have the same level of possible confusion in English. I find the idea of assigning a sex to inanimate objects such as candles or trampolines to be just weird.

One the upside, it could be worse! I believe that German has three sexes: male, female and gender neutral. Which sounds sensible until you learn that objects have sex...

5 years ago

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You think that having "gender" (and not "sex" it's different) for things is weird, but I think it's weird to call female or male animals "it". Indeed, English has only 2 genders: unisex and neutral.

I like having "gender" for non-living things, it makes the language more poetic... When you know a car is feminine, sometimes you understand some masculine passions ^^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/musickluvr

We have some of the same types of generalities in English... when we say "mankind" for example, it includes women. Usually it refers to people in the plural form. We sometimes say "he" & it can mean either gender. It has only been fairly recently that we started saying he or she, even using "(s)he" when writing, to be politically correct. There are other examples, but I can't think of them right now. That's the only way I can think of to explain it, & not even sure if it applies. But I hope it helps somehow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MimsiTroda

It means child but it depends on which gender it is! Niño means boy, and niña means girl.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseASanta

Look at this

Spanish. English Niño. Boy Niña. Girl Niñ(o/a) Child

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yonghu123

"El niño come pan." literally means" The boy eats bread."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandtiger

using more and different versions of the verbs in verbal translation would help [ie. "Yo como", "Tu comes" etc]. Most of them are based on he/she.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Here you have all present simple persons:

Yo como - Tú comes - Él/Ella/Ello/Usted come - Nosotros comemos - Vosotros coméis - Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes comen

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marmar1234

how come in this case there is no accent on the El?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

el == the

él == he

El niño come pan == The boy eats bread

Él niño come pan == He boy eats bread

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyPgood

Thank you! I was wondering the same thing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlurrDK

wouldn't it be just Él come pan== He eats bread instead of Él niño come pan== He boy eats bread because He boy eats bread is not proper grammar am i correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Precisely that is why I wanted to point out both the correct way and the suggested way of marmar1234, so the difference [and the mistake] can be understood in English as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cpati

makes sense now , thank you so much

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drhehe

is pan pronounced as more like "paan" or "baan"? I keep hearing the b sound rather the p sound...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aishokuareno

OHHHHHHHHH I GET IT GUYS, We have to mark ALL THE CORRECT ANSWERS, so if we only mark one of them, like in my case, you get the answer wrong. Haha, my derp moment of the day....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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We don't have all the same exercise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsalover1

The child eats bread.:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamJ94

"El niño come pan" is also correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glenbelt

Why is there no accent on the E of El this time, compared to "el es un nino"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arco_iris

With the accent is 'he' and no accent is 'the'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robinj77

"el" is the article "the", in this case "the boy". "él" is the pronoun (?) "he", so "él come pan".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I have a hard time precisely pronouncing el and ella Is it aa and aaya? Come is it co may or com ay?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ichuta

try saying elbow without bow for el,and for ella try with the letter e and then add the pronounciation of shower without wer.im not a teacher, im doing my best

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edgey54

two ll iprounounced Y in spain..eeya ,latin america eiia=a,ja

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Thank you. I thought ella sounded like you stated eeya. I am not sure about your reference to eiia=a,ja is it ella in latin america sounds like "a ja" if so is the a like the sound ate or at. And is j like jut or hut. I hope this makes sense. You guys are great for helping me. I hope I can do the same in the future.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I want to thank you for your help. I can see how difficult it is to use letters to define a sound when the letters themselves sound differently in English and Spanish. I have not been exposed to any spanish so its hard. I learned French in school many years ago and I think my spanish sounds french. I will check the internet to see if I can find a site that slowly pronounces the letters. I find in the exercises I need to hear it slower and I can't slow the speech in every case. This will get better with more experience.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandrabertucelli

Search for a phonetic alphabet transcription(IPA-International Phonetic Alphabet), maybe in Wikipedia. It's a little complicated but it provides a uniform phonetic description for all (natural) human languages.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntHill12790

I will give it a go real fast. the way ella is pronounced is like short a then ya with a long a. so it would be a-ya. kinda like if you were to say heya but with a silent h.

then el is harder to describe. its like saying el in elbow like another said but with kind of an "a" sound to it. i imagine it like you are saying a short a directly into the l sound.

hope this helps.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

maybe : espagnolfacile.com or studyspanish.com The second one is very good. You get the prononciation of Spain and also from Peru.

5 years ago

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Espagnolfacile is available in another language than French?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CDG01

try this website for the phonetics of each letter and how the sounds change depending on where it is placed in the word. http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/# You can play an animation too of how your lips/tongue should be.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iroseangel

How would you say "the boy eats bread"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TamaCara

El nino come pan. With the tilda above the second n.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iroseangel

how can you "hear" the difference between "El"with an accent mark and "El" without an accent mark?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Virikita
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There´s no difference. You can know for the use in the sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cpetzold

Why do you not need el or un before pan in this instance?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

For the same reason it does not need it in English. It is exactly the same use.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julia.milovich

In a strict sense it means The boy eats bread, however in common usage it could also just mean The child eats bread. Yes, the gender denotes a male child, but it would still be correct to use either boy or child. Grr maybe I should just skip ahead since they don't want me thinking too much in these beginner lessons.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricaNicholas

I thought that children in general was ninos not nino?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

But here, the sentence is about the boy and not the boys. el niño= the boy los niños = the boys

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraDoe

actually your right. I've been raised talking perfect Spanish and English

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoySimmons46

Nino is a translation for both child and boy, as Spanish is dominantly translated into male terms and general terms. El, Nino etc,,

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magic.nik

what is the main diference, beatween "a" and "the" ...? for instance : a boy / the boy (in Spanish) ?

Tnx 4 info ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishspeak123

magicnik, a is an indefinite article and the is a definite article. a way to see it is, if you say "a man", then you mean ANY man. if you say "the man" then you mean a SPECEFIC man.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHANDLER031

i suck at spanish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyPaul

I don't understand why it's "come" and not "como". I thought if's male then it's most likely an -o at the end? Is there a crash course video for conjugations? I'd quite like to learn how to change the words myself then been explicitly told for each new word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edgey54

e in spanish pronounced a,,,,co-maa a " " " e per como? what?, aY?,understand?/what you talking about?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iroseangel

how can you "hear" the difference between "El"with an accent mark and "El" without an accent mark?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

You may not be able to hear the difference, but if you listen carefully, you'll know. After el, a noun will follow : el niño, el gato, el coche. Él come pan, él bebe agua, in that case, a verb is following él.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karl-Gorman

That picture I saw earlier of the "bread" looked much more like a cake than a loaf of bread (which - according to a quick check on google, should be "pastel."). I might be mistaken, of course, it might actually BE a loaf of bread. But I honestly thought it was a cake at first.

5 years ago

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There was a picture on the site?
Loaf of bread = pieza de pan/barra de pan.
Pastel = cake/pie.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorganLiam

doesn't nino mean boy

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TamaCara

Yes. It can mean boy or child, the context helps know the difference. In this case, either would be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tinkerbenz

Great answer!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OhJay

This seems to go against what people have been saying in previous lessons here about "is eating" rather than "eats". The translation as I understood it should be "The child eats bread" but the only option that fit was "is eating" so are they interchangeable or is that a bit more advanced?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

It is a bit hard to explain. They are interchangeable if the action takes place now. However, note that in English present continuous is used for future actions as well such as 'We are leaving tomorrow', in Spanish only the translation of 'we leave tomorrow' is correct. We sometimes use present simple for future actions, but not present continuous.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FayeB57

They've since changed it so that the "correct" answer shows "The boy eats bread."

5 years ago

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And before?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/9Rond6

Is there a difference between "El niño come pan" and "El niño come el pan"? Why isn't there "un" or "el" before "pan"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Since pan can be used as uncountable, 'come pan' means 'is eating an unknown quantity of bread'. With the article, it means 'is eating a specific unit of bread'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strongbrad

I answered the boy eats bread and it said I was wrong? What gives?

4 years ago

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It's correct, maybe you had to select several answers, I don't know what was the question of your exercise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aiguina

So is the reason why the answer is both "the boy eats bread" and "the child eats bread" because the definite article el encompasses both groups of men and heterogeneous people (aka groups of men and women)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Nothing to do with the article. A word can have more than a meaning. It's the same in English.

niño can mean (male) child or boy, with or without the article.

The definite article "el" is only for the singular, not for groups, and only for a male.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dinanda567

So far the comments haven't helped me here. I'm still rather confused on the difference between The child and The boy. Earlier in my lessons it said "the child" was "el chico"..so i thought it was the same here but i got it wrong...x.x i understand that these two can be used interchangably tho..so is my answer still ok?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

when you say the child, it could be boy or girl, but niño is a child or a boy

4 years ago

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The chico, is rather exclusively the "boy", and can be a boy a bit older than a niño. Whereas the niño can mean both "boy" or (male) child.

Chico and niño can be considered as interchangeable here (because we don't know the context and how old is the boy) but only with the meaning of "boy", with the meaning of (male) child, it's only niño. I don't know if my explanations are clear.

To sum up "Earlier in my lessons it said "the child" was "el chico" ---> wrong, it's "niño", not "chico".

So, when you have to translate: "a boy..." you can use "chico" or "niño", but when you have to translate: "a child", you have to put "niño" or "niña" (if it's a female child) If you have no context to know the gender of the child, both are accepted, the masculine, and the feminine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictoriaMadison

The child could be a boy and girl….

4 years ago

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Yes, if you had the English sentence to translate, "the child", you can translate it by "niño" (male child) or niña (female child)

If you have niño to translate, it's child, but mean a male child.
If you have niña to translate, it's child, but mean a female child.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PrincessSm1

Does it matter that we would never use that sentence? I've just never said, "The child", I guess I would just say "kid" and I've never said, "The kid eats bread" because I would say "is eating" instead. Is this more about sentence structure and less about vernacular?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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It doesn't matter, you are here to learn "how to say", to be able to have a conversation, and understand it, you don't have to use the words, you have to understand them, and to be able to do the exercise, each of us are free to prefer a word rather than another one. There are lot of words you never use in English, but you learnt them.

Kids, is unformal, child is proper and formal.

There's no context, you can need to say "The boy eats" in some context, (if you tell a story, it's often, etc...)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abdlmjeed

i wonder how could we distinguish by pronounce among the article El and the pronoune Él ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

There is no difference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jae_woods

why do they have nino as both boy and child? and could you use "the child eats bread"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AzaKNic1853

it sounds like eat sometimes i get confused but it ussally works out for me very well

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babykeem

so come is eat

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilsonLam6

i though its eat

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanTDM27

Hi i am new i joined 1minute ago i am confused what does come mean in english?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RauleEstobar

I disagree. El nino means little boy or child. If you just wanted "boy" then you should use: el muchacho or even el chico

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eolhc27

What's the difference between come and comes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciara_was_here

How do you tell the difference between come and comes? Sorry I'm a bit slow

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuofulHelper

informal second person singular (tú) -> comes
formal second person singular (usted)/third person singular (él/ella) -> come

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gellisa_Lin

What's the difference? Come, comes, como?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuofulHelper

first person singular (yo) -> como
informal second person singular (tú) -> comes
formal second person singular (usted)/third person singular (él/ella) -> come

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saynastyles

I don't get the come versus comes

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saynastyles

why Is it come not comes

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuofulHelper

informal second person singular (tú) -> comes
formal second person singular (usted)/third person singular (él/ella) -> come

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/metaphorz

I am having issues with the verb conjugation. I think I am getting it: first person is "como", second person (vos, tu, usted) is comes and third person is come? I need to continue to bang this into my head. I don't know if other verbs follow a rule (e.g., "o", "es", "e" at the end of the verb)?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuofulHelper

first person singular (yo) -> como
informal second person singular (tú) -> comes
formal second person singular (usted)/third person singular (él/ella) -> come
first person plural (nosotros/nosotras) -> comemos
informal second person plural [Spain only] (vosotros/vosotras) -> coméis
formal second person plural (ustedes)/third person plural (ellos/ellas) -> comen

Not all verbs are conjugated the same way. It depends on the ending of the infinitive. https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-present-tense-forms/

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGSchmLd

what is wrong with the audio???

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnnyhess1

I write down translation in english comes up saying its wrong

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasAlla5

It states I am incorrect even though my answer was exactly the same as the app provided.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SangamGuli

why can't I say that the girl eats bread . ? because the word nino is used for girls .

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuofulHelper

niño -> male child
niña -> female child

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lira791985

I don't get it, I said: "the boy eats bread". El nino means boy, right?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baza656878

El nino come pan means the boy eats bread.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natalieblo9

i love this app

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D.EstherNJ

Eat your crust, son.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Qhayhin

Don't know why "The Boy Eats Grandmothers" doesn't work.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rage_Mode
Rage_Mode
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Awww no what about me

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertahol6

Typo

1 week ago