"C'est sa fiancée."

Translation:This is his fiancée.

December 15, 2012

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SwedBall

Since when does english require the use of accents...

March 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Thrissel

It certainly doesn't for people who don't even use capitals for proper nouns.

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnicolson

Ok - found mechanism for accents :)

December 15, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/mynameismott
  • 21
  • 20
  • 18
  • 8
  • 3

Is there a difference in pronouciation with fiancé and fiancée? I can't tell.

February 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/atiklamine
  • 19
  • 16
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

fiancé c'est le masculin, fiancée c'est féminin , le 'e' a la fin c'est pour le féminin c'est tous, so the husband was fiancé without 'e' , the wife was fiancée with 'e' , good luck

February 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Laetitia_Lalila

No, there is no difference in the pronunciation, but the presence of the possesive adjective "sa" or "son" before the noun can tip you off on the gender.

March 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/atiklamine
  • 19
  • 16
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

is the english language contains the accent letters ?!!! can we say fiancé or fiancée !!!

February 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/shriramk

English has anything you want. You can write English with or without accents. There are stylists (e.g., the New Yorker magazine) that even insists on umlauts as diereses (e.g., "coöperate" instead of "cooperate"). English is a great big bucket of slopping mud: everything goes in but you don't recognize the thing that comes out.

April 15, 2013
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.