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"En un rato comemos."

Translation:In a while we will eat.

0
5 years ago

119 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/manlal

Shouldn´t the verb be in future tense? Just wondering.

88
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ichilingo

In Spanish, things happening soon are usually in present tense, even though they would be in the future tense in English. That's what I've been told, at least.

221
Reply34 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

The same thing happens in English (using the present for the future sometimes). Not necessarily in the same ways or in the same examples, but it does happen. The hard part is in the differences between the two languages ...

49
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ichilingo

Can you give an example? My brain is blanking out on when that would be used.

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

"We leave tomorrow." "The performance begins in a minute." "She speaks after he does." Often, this happens with scheduled events or things in the "near future" (and that definition is up to the speaker).

All of these could be said in other ways, of course. I'm not saying that people don't say it in other ways. But, native speakers can and do use this kind of phrasing fairly often.

Edit (one year later): agreeing with mpcairney (but DL won't let me reply to his comment):

mpcairney: We only use the present simple for scheduled events, we use the present continuous for near future. "I'm switching off the phone"

Agreed.

253
Reply74 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpcairney

We only use the present simple for scheduled events, we use the present continuous for near future. "I'm switching off the phone"

36
33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

@ Mjcm94: (DL won't let me respond directly; I hope you see this response.)

English and Spanish differ a little in grammatical usage of present time and future time.

For example, in Spanish, it is perfectly acceptable to say te aviso for "I'll let you know" whereas in English (to me) "I let you know" is not the same. "I let you know" used in place of "I'll let you know" sounds foreign to me. (And now you know why you hear this from non-native speakers; it's not just that they don't know how to express the future in English.)

For me, the above sentence is most naturally translated as "We'll eat in a (little) while." For this kind of situation, we use the future and Spanish can use either the present or the future. Conversationally, I hear the present tense being used.

So ... the "will" is just to express the future in English, to make this translation more accurate even if the same tense is not being used.

21
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
sandeepa2
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Muchas gracias por la explicación

7
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjcm94

Hi, you seem to know what your talking about, in this sentence where does the "will" come from? Gracias

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillDean0

"we are going in the morning" might be an example.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tudka

Haha. Similar to cultural thing when saying I will do it "mañana" meaning tomorrow, but it never comes.:)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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but isn't "comemos" also the future tense ending for the nosotros? so this sentence could be in the future tense as well.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senor_pato34

No, if i remember correctly it would be comeremos

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdx3
mcdx3
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I don't care when you eat, as long as 'tu no comes la rata.'

39
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amodia
Amodia
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I first thought "Well that's not creepy" because I read rata and not rato. So I read the sentence as "We eat in a rat."

34
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicc_walker

Hahaha me too! And "Rato" in portugueses is mouse/rat, then when I saw it got me afraid. I was wondering how it's possible to eat in a rat

13
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicki1982

is this valid (en un rato) in all spanish speaking countries?

26
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Why would somebody downvote a legitimate question?

10
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nheiserman

Would "Comemos en un rato" be proper?

12
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinu
Cinu
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Wouldn't it mean we eat for a while? I'm just learning though, so not really sure.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bratamoli

I would like to know this as well, if any native speakers (or fluent speakers) could be so kind...

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darrhiggs

From a native's mouth: "It's exactly the same"

3
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bratamoli

¡Muchas gracias! -le doy a usted un lingot-

0
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darrhiggs

no es necesario utilizar a usted en este caso.

3
23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bratamoli

Otra pregunta: ¿"a usted" es necesario o implícitas en este contexto?

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fergkane

a little while should also be ok?

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljaksdv

That would be "En un poco rato..." If you just said, "In a while", it could mean in a long stretch of time (at least comparatively). If you said, "In a little while", it would mean in a short amount of time.

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Great answer!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusieY

It seems to me to be so. I use this in everyday speech and hear it frequently.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
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i think it will be even more accurate

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yarjka
yarjka
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awhile vs. 'a while': I've learned some new English grammar today.

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merryanna

Why is it that 'yo leo un rato' is translated 'I read awhile' with no space between a and while, and here 'awhile' isn't valid and the correct answer is 'a while' with a space. Is this just an inconsistency?

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hema90

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/a-while-awhile.aspx

I had the same problem, but that answers it pretty effectively. It's an annoying little thing in the English language.

9
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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"A while" (two words) is a noun phrase and can be the object of a preposition as in "for a while" or "in a while." However, "awhile" (one word) is an adverb and is only used directly with a verb or phrasal verb: "Sit and talk awhile," or "Hang out awhile."

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

and awhile seems to be more popular with Americans than with Brits.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MabKnight14

Because here it's "en un rato," not just "un rato." So that would mean "in a while" and awhile doesn't work for that.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biswarup

Didn't accept "We shall eat in a while"

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MMiner237
MMiner237
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Because "shall eat" is future tense. In Spanish that would be "comeremos." This is saying "In a while we eat." or "We eat in a while."

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adra04778

We will eat soon, is also widely used.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

soon means PRONTO

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

I prefer "soon" to "a little bit"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Although I don't see “soon" as having the same meaning as “in a while", I also prefer “soon" over “a little bit".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sama.Dobrota
Sama.Dobrota
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But duolingo says "we will eat soon" is wrong, 'in a while we will eat" is correct. I don't understand.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alanbethcam

it did not accept: We will eat shortly. I guess I should have been more literal.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

This sounds correct to me. That is to say, I believe it gets across the spirit of the meaning in Spanish and is idiomatically correct in English. I like your translation. I wrote "We'll eat in a moment" and it was accepted.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

“A while" could be an hour; it is very nonspecific. But if I was told, “We'll eat shortly" and then I had to wait more than a half-hour (or 15 even), I may get grumpy!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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"in a while we eat" is it correct in english?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin630425

I wrote "Let's eat in a little while" and it was rejected. It sounded more natural, but would that be considered more of a command?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Splixy

Correction: in a little while we will eat

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack425427

Isn't rato mouse in spanish

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowellThoerner

You could change this sentence so much just by adding an accent an an n. 'En un ratón comemos' would mean 'We eat inside a rat.'

1
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeCool487756

Shouldn't it take we are eating soon?

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonmflynn

Why ought we to translate this verb as a future-tense statement in English? I mean, that is the apparent meaning of the sentence, but if this is the proper translation, why isn't the Spanish in the future-tense, too? I've had this same issue in Italian, as well. Can it be contextually okay to translate a present-tense indicative verb from Spanish (or Italian, for that matter) into a (near) future-tense in English?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Yes. This just happens sometimes in translation. Different languages don't always use the verb tenses in the same way. English sometimes uses the simple present when another language would use the future. Fairly often, when translating the present tense from the Spanish, in English we use the present progressive.

It's like in English we say, "I am twenty years old," whereas in Spanish (and many other languages) we say, "I have twenty years." There are different ways to express the same idea.

Forgive me if this was not your question; I was also just adding to the conversation.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gemunu

Yes, the translation; " In a while we shall eat" , is correct. " In a short while", would be "En un rato corto"

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebag

Do you mean 'within a short time?'

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

“In a while" isn't the exact same thing as “short time". It pretty close though. It means not right now, and not in a very long time. It is pretty general. “We are eating shortly" to me would imply that it is okay to head to the dinner table if you want, because it will happen incredibly soon. “We will eat in a while" feels more indefinite. We will be eating, I promise, but it may be in 15 minutes or maybe it will be an hour and 15. Those would both be “in a while", but I would feel deceived if somebody tried to tell me 75 minutes is “eating shortly".

0
Reply4 years ago