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https://www.duolingo.com/Diego5ever

Which is Easier?

Does anyone else find it easier to understand Spanish when it is being spoken to you in person rather than when you try to watch a movie or listen to the radio? I've always found it to be easier. A lot of people, however, seem to prefer watching movies and TV shows in order to improve their comprehension of the language. Is there a reason for this, am I missing something? I was starting to think that maybe it is easier and that shows were more challenging and that's why people tend to do that first. Let me know what you think. Also, aside from speaking and listening, what are some other ways to increase vocabulary quickly without become too confused? I know that reading is crucial but after a while, I feel like the new words go in one ear and the older ones go out the other. Any help would be great! Thanks!

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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I find it slightly easier watching and listening to media. I never really did the "beginner" podcasts, shows, etc. but went straight to native-speed things (for about three or four weeks). It took longer, and it sort of felt as if I wasn't making progress, but when I decided to listen to an intermediate podcast (Notes in Spanish), I could understand nearly everything (and listening to people speak was no trouble). So, maybe it's just that the speed is a bit too fast for you right now. Keep going, and soon it'll become clearer.

If you want to learn vocabulary about fashion, for example, read articles in Spanish about fashion, visit store sites that have Spanish options, practice writing about articles of clothing (like describing a favorite outfit), and things of that nature. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronTupaz
AaronTupaz
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I studied spanish grammar intensively that I can speak in spanish and can fool native speakers to thinking I'm somewhat fluent, but my comprehension is very weak. During those 3-4 weeks, how many hours a day did you spend listening to native-speed Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Not sure, I don't work well with precise schedules, ha ha. I guess maybe an hour an day, as sometimes I would have Spanish music playing for a couple of hours. Sometimes it would just be 10 minutes of a podcast or a show, though. 30 minutes a day for a month will help you immensely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traroloc

You have just a different way to learn and improve your spanish skills, that is all. Sometimes I feel the same thing. I usually turn on the television and watch CNN in english, of course I am able to understand what is the new about but I lose the details. Then, I go out for a walk and speak with a man who came from abroad and english is his first tongue, he tells me about the live in his homeland and his family, it is a challenge maintain a conversation, but it is great at the same time

Greetings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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Well, it's easier to find movies and TV shows than it is to find a native speaker, especially once you have to try to start scheduling in time to talk. It's also less frightening. I'd say you really should be doing both, but I'm not really one to talk.

I definitely would say that reading is the best thing you can do for vocabulary - I personally don't really try to actively memorize words, though. I kind of just look them up when I come across them until the frustration of seeing the same word for the twentieth time finally burns it into my long-term memory. My lackadaisical method is probably not the most efficient, but I don't really think that retention is something that happens overnight. At least not for me. =)

3 years ago