Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Mi amiga está en el monte."

Translation:My friend is on the hill.

5 years ago

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bbbindle
bbbindle
  • 15
  • 13
  • 10

Monte means woodland?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clyde_the_camel

Monte means mountain (also, montaña), although I've seen "monte alto" as "forest" or "grove of trees."

Were it me making the big choices I'd use "bosque" for forest or woods.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyanracoste

It accepted my answer of "the woods", which is much more common in the northeast US, where I'm from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Midwest US also.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahj2000

Southeast too. I'm pretty sure everywhere in the US/Canada.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

No. 51% of the U.S. forestland is east of the Mississippi.

The former "prairies" of the U.S. were not forests They were prairie (grassland) and comprise the area from mid Illinois to the Rocky Mountains. The eastern prairies are now farmland.

The western prairies and farther west (beginning about mid- Nebraska/Kansas) are grassland, semi-desert, and scrubland).-- until one reaches the Sierra and Cascade ranges (cordilleras of Washington, Oregon, California.

Much the same with Canada.

If you seen many many "westerns" , you will know that much of the west is not forested.

(Although, creo que muchos de los "Spaghetti westerns' (Clint Eastwood, etc.) fueron filmado en Espana.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

usage of "the woods" is more common in NE USA, the Midwest and southeast too. How much Forrest you have does not dictate what you must call it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Unfortunately many of the Southern forestland is burning now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Yes, very unfortunate.
Beginning about the year 2000, the budget for the U.S. Forest Service to fight fires has been increasing.. This is expected to rise to 2/3 of the budget in 10 years.

Due to climate change, the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in 1980. http://www.fs.fed.us/sites/default/files/2015-Rising-Cost-Wildfire-Operations.pdf

The forest of southeast are mostly private land, but I believe the US forest may assist in fighting fires on private land.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Si, according to my dictionary. It means mount, mountain and woodland...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

I also saw pasture. Maybe it just means anyplace outside.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tangaloor

I am a little surprised that Duo accepted 'hill' as a translation for 'monte'. Awesome.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

It wouldn't accept 'mount' despite it being in the hints box - which mountain wasn't!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Florakookypants

The mount in the hints is an imperative, ie get on your horse! :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
  • 17
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 2

or like the title of a mountain Monte McKinley etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

McKinley, I think, would be considered un pico (mountain peak).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/measerp

Now known as Monte Denali! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Not for long...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chistesen

'Hill' is the most common translation whereas 'mountain' is expressed as 'montan~a'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elder_Monson

Cerro is the argentine word for hill

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
  • 25
  • 19
  • 18
  • 11
  • 1255

Monte to me has always been weeds, but I used the dropdown. Then I put woodlands instead of woodland, and it was counted wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schm00

I also put "woodlands". In everyday English, this seems to be the more common usage of the word. Woodland, in the singular, is usually only used when describing geography. Ex. "This area on the map is a woodland" This is just my experience with the usage .. it may or may not be grammatically correct. (I'm going to report it, just for funsies)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
  • 25
  • 19
  • 18
  • 11
  • 1255

Oh, I complained. I asked them what they were going to do about the singular "badland".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I agree, normally in english we would use "woodlandS", I have also reported this as should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoLingo76

I agree. In common usage "woodland" is an adjective and "woodlands" a noun. DL did however accept "woods" as a translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
  • 21
  • 14
  • 5
  • 3

This is just a strange word to use in an introductory language lesson. In American English the term woodland(s) is rare and normally only occurs as a scientific or official terrain reference, not normal speech. It is also confusing to native Spanish speakers, as shown in this discussion: https://ar.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071231064924AABesbL ---a few questions later, they translate it as "scrubland"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

Never heard of 'scrubland'. Webster's New World Dictionary has 'scrubwoman' but not scrubland. We didn't have scrubland in Pennsylvania (my native state) or even here in North Carolina (currently living). Maybe it's only found in Latin America. Where does Duo come up with some of these translations?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
  • 21
  • 14
  • 5
  • 3

In Northern California we had scrub pines and scrub bushes, both gnarled, tough looking, ugly. I associate "scrublands" with these images - desert or routinely hot places of sparse vegetation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GScottOliver
GScottOliver
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 11
  • 9
  • 224

Yes, similar to what Ladron said, much of the Great Basin of Nevada is scrubland; home to the scrub jays!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

the American west has lots (is mostly?) of scrubland. Colorado, Califronia, eastern Washington and Oregon, Idaho, etc. Most BLM land is scrubland (or shrubland).
It tends to be drier land. Pennsylvania (where I lived for 10 years) is much more wet -- which is why it has so much forest (woodlands).

The Mediterranean area, including Spain, has plenty of scrubland. The so-called Spaghetti Westerns (Clint Eastwood) were filmed in Spanish scrub-lands, because they are like the American West.

Here are a couple links: http://www.britannica.com/science/scrubland https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrubland

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chistesen

Yes, 'woodlands' is not common, but 'monte' is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cambelr

From the song "Guantanamera". Mi verso es un ciervo herido que busca en el monte amparo. My verse is like a wounded fawn that searches in the mountais for refuge.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Excelente. Gracias

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Florakookypants

I put wood, but was marked wrong it should have been woods. So I'm wondering what the Spanish for "the wood" would be (as in ' I walked through the wood') maybe I'm the only one who uses wood this way !!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IndaImmega
IndaImmega
  • 25
  • 25
  • 381

I think I would more often say "I walked through the woods".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Yes, I walked through the woods would be much more common than I walked through the woodland, at least in the US.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cm008012
Cm008012Plus
  • 19
  • 17
  • 17
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6

As Indalmmega said, people normally say "I walked through the woods." "I walked through the wood" would imply that you walked through a singular piece of wood (ouch!) instead of walking beetween several pieces of wood (trees).

The woods (as in forest) can be translated into Spanish as 'el bosque'. The wood (as in a piece of wood) can be translated to 'la madera'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2
  • 316

"I walked through the wood" is not common in English, but can be used for walking through a forest. However, you are more likely to find it in poetry, as in "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

No, you're not!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
  • 21
  • 14
  • 5
  • 3

wood/woodland=BE woods/woodlands=AE. There are exceptions, but that is the norm.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

¿Hay una diferencia entre MONTE y PICO? En español se dice Monte Blanco y Monte Rosa...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chistesen

Be careful using the term 'pico' in some countries as it is used in slang also. There's a famous story of Indira Gandhi traveling in South America with an interpreter from one country who used this term in a country where a room of military brass were greatly surprised!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.Eileen

Actually in several dictionaries monte means mount - as in Mount Sinai for example. Mountain is montana!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RafikiL.K.

I would never say 'My friend is in the mountain' which was given as a correct answer. I was marked incorrect for 'My friend is at the mountain'. I should have just played it safe with Duolingo and said 'My friend is on the mountain' -_-

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerbair

I used "mount" and it was counted wrong. Abby ideas why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnimble
Gnimble
  • 25
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1105

Mount is one of the definition duo gives for this word and is accepted in other sentences. I'm not sure why it is not accepted here either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
  • 25
  • 13
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 170

In another discussion on this word, it said that monte is mount but has also become used for the scrubland that is commonly found on mountains. They also said that montana is mountain. Yet mount was marked wrong here! Grrr!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

how about - my friend is in the foothills

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BritaJ

The previous sentence had monte as scrubland, and now it is woodland. Those are two very different environments. Do native Spanish speakers really use these two definitions interchangeably?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

Duolingo gave scrubland, mountain, mount! as the translations for el monte. We already had bosque as woods/forest. Nothing that had to do with wood or trees was given as a translation for monte??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Google Translate also does the same. So does Spanish Dictionary .com Instead of blaming Duolingo, blame the millions of Spanish speakers around the world who grew up with regional differences.

Or better, blame the diversity of people, countries, and regions.

I never heard of a "packy" until I went to Connecticut. I never heard of a "mountain pie" ( a small "pizza" cooked on a camp fire) until I moved to Pennsylvania. I never heard of "American chop suey" until I lived in Maine (a tomato and macroni dish). I never heard of a "freeway" until I moved out west (so many interstate highways in the east are "tollways." Is it "soda" "pop" "soda pop" or "Coke"? (In the Ameri. South, "coke' means "soda pop". "Do you want a Coke?" means "Do you want a soda?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donescondida

here in New Zealand, we call the woodland the bush. This was marked as incorrect . But I understand that this terminology is not universal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 32

Yes, we say the bush also in Canada, means the forest..

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

I used "hill country", another NZ-ism apparently - and got it wrong too. Next time I'll try "ngahere"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

Sounds ominous. Resting peacefully in a shallow grave?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbierly

Now the correct answer is "My friend is on the hills", not an answer in the discussion nor in the suggestions for "monte" in this question nor earlier in the other question. Interesting discussion though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjjacob
rjjacob
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 15
  • 5
  • 1051

The first clue was "scrub land". Most English speakers would be more comfortable saying "bush".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 32

Why does the drop-down say cast on or get on, that seems like verb phrase, not a location..

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

This is not a natural sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rbellville49

The sentence should read like this, Mi amiga está en los bosques. So why doesn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivienjean

the wood (singular) acceptable in the UK when referring to a specific place

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StabbySteph

My friend is "in" the mountain!? REALLY? Really?

No

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.Eileen

I think I'm missing something vital. Where is the dropbox of hints?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robin_K

When you are translating from Spanish to English the Spanish words should have hints it you hover over them with your cursor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.Eileen

I think I'm missing something vital. Where is the dropbox of hints?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kevets55
kevets55
  • 24
  • 12
  • 2
  • 39

Maybe we should contribute a buck so they can pay someone to proofread..so many useless and ambiguous translations

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

A bilingual intern would do the trick.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipMosc

Duo also offers "scrubland" for monte.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryn1953
bryn1953
  • 25
  • 23
  • 9
  • 4
  • 15

Bad exercise for native English speakers

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajray-
Ajray-
  • 12
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

First of all what is a woodland. Land is not made of wood. Never heard of this word in my life. Second, the first time I gave the translation of mount which was accepted and now its not. Third, how are mountain and woodland synonyms. Mountains aren't made of wood either and in class I learned its spanish equivalent was montan~a so why doesn't that show up in reverse translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
  • 25
  • 16
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1460

A woodland is a generally flat land area which is covered by wood (i.e. trees), but not to the same extent as an actual forest. Scrubland (also a synonym for el monte) is land covered by scrub, which is primarily smaller trees and bushes.

English also has several other similar terms, including grassland (prairie), marshland (swamp) and wasteland (barrens).

Hope this helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BritaJ

I live in America (New England) and woodland is a normal word. It is a light airy forest as apposed to a deep dark forest, but mostly used as an adjective. "Oh, look at Bambi and all the little woodland creatures."

3 years ago