"De hoed van de meneer"

Translation:The man's hat

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/leeksoup

I wanted to put "The hat of the sir" for some reason..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DasEisbrecher
DasEisbrecher
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That's what I wrote and it was accepted :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cobacabana-22

I put "the sir's hat" and was marked correctly as well!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homesliceburns

That's a really long way of saying "The man's hat"...just saying.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SailorWeeb

I somehow managed to put 'The hat is made of man'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom-U
Tom-U
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"De eten van de kat. The cat's food." Am I right? :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
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Almost right! "Eten" is a het-word, so it's: "Het eten van de kat".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom-U
Tom-U
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Oops, I had forgotten it :D Thank you for the correction :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlessaTrip

I put "The gentleman's hat" and it accepts that but gives another translation of "the man's hat". I will report it because I think "gentleman" is more polite and formal than "man" in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babushka5

I guess the question is how much more formal it is

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Meneer" is somewhere in between 'man' and 'gentleman', in terms of formality. Even more formal would be "heer".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EkjSieStoltheit

Why "the sir's hat" and not "sir's hat"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Because "de" = the.

You can't just leave out the articles, neither in English nor in Dutch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Yes you can, in English at least. "Sir's hat" is what a very posh waiter or butler would say upon handing a hat to the man he was serving. On the other hand, "the sir's hat" is incorrect. Sir is how you address somebody, it is not the term used to describe them (that would be "the gentleman").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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I think Simius is saying that if a Dutch sentence has "de" it has to be translate to "the" in English, the variant English sentence without "the" has a different meaning, and vice versa, not that this sentence does not make sense without "the".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaureenCG

But in this case, that's wrong. You would NEVER say 'the sir's hat', so it can't be right to translate this phrase into nonsensical English. Anyone who has seen Jeeves and Wooster must remember 'Sir's hat' with a sardonic intonation?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranidamien

What does van here mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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"of" - the hat of the gentleman - the gentleman's hat.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devaoneplus

What doea van mean ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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van=of

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecilia798621

Goodness i feel dumb. I put the hat's man

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuputDewii

I wrote "the hat belongs to the man" and its wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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It is wrong, the sentence isn't declaring that the man owns the hat, it's referring to the hat that we already know belongs to the man.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewInCO

It's looking for the closest translation of the given words, not what they can be interpreted to mean.

10 months ago
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