"Es gibt zwölf Monate."

Translation:There are twelve months.

August 30, 2013

19 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

The "-n" is only added in the dative plural, e.g. "in zwölf Monaten" (in twelve months). In the sentence in the excercise, "Monate" is accusative plural, so no "-n" is added.

(There is also a special group of nouns that adds an -n in other cases as well, but the word "Monat" (month) does not belong to this group.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanover_Fiste

Would "It goes twelve months" be a valid translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghfhfgffhjhfj

No, it wouldn't. "Es gibt" (literally: It gives) is the German way to say "there are/there is". Moreover, "gibt" (gives) has nothing to do with "geht" (goes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanover_Fiste

You're right. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julya.Myss

Hello I've got a question, how would you say "there are twelve months in a year" in German, it would be like this "Es gibt Zwolf Monate im Jahr oder Es gibt Zwolf Monate am Jahr" ? Thanks!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

IM JAHR, in the. Im is always used in time.

Im jahr 2014 : also as of 2014.

It also being used in a long stretch of time.

IM ALTER : in old age or not specific occassion or generality.

IM ALLGEMEIN : In General/ generally.


While Am is used on occassions.

Am Abend (in the evening),

Am Anfang (at the beginning)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kijkenroboter

So 'Es gibt' is same as 'there be' in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

no, it is exclusive to there is or there are or it gives...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhku722

just for laughs, and clarification, how would one say "it gives the cat a dog" Google translate uses "Sie gibt" for it gives apparently. Is there a way to tell the difference between "there is" and "it gives", other than context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

merely you have to rely on context

  • Es gibt ihm Leben - It gives him life.

  • Es gibt Leben - There is life.

maybe it gives would be possible if there is a dative pronoun around I think like: "to him/her/etc."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vltello

I guess "it takes twelve months" could be a good translation too, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

No, that's not what "es gibt" means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dghitc

Why is "there is" wrong for "es gibt?" Doesn't "es" mean "is"? It was also given as a possible answer in the hover down menu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

"Es gibt" means both "there is" and "there are". The literal translation of "es gibt" is "it gives" - "es" means "it"; "is" would be "ist". So in German you literally say "it gives" when you would say "there is" or "there are" in English.

In English, you use "there is" before a singular noun and "there are" before a plural noun. That's why it's "There are twelve months".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dghitc

Okay, thanks. I used "there is" for a earlier sentence with "es gibt" and thought it would work here also without considering the plural/singular thing. To me German would be easier to learn if they stuck with the literal translation(s).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orfeocookie

But "there is" is wrong ENGLISH, not wrong German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

Yes and to germans english would be easier to learn if THEY would stick to literal translations.

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.