"Ich gehe zur Bushaltestelle."

Translation:I am going to the bus stop.

August 30, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drstrangelove.

this word is easy to cut into pieces

bus - halte - stelle bus - stop - point

October 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlazingFast

Love it. This helps a lot with my pronunciation!

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevinkrato

danke!

January 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorrinaCou

Bus stop place, basically

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsadZaman2

Ein Lingot fur Sie

December 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinh227

When should I use zu and nach?

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valestellarium

I know "nach" is for countries and cities, always. "zu" only indicates a specific direction. There are more explanations in other exercises though.

May 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seltima

Why it did not accept me a bus station in this sentence?

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lookword

Bushaltestelle = bus stop

Busbahnhof = bus station

I think, it's OK that Duolingo wants the strict translation

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seltima

THanks

August 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avantha

How can bus halt be wrong

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimmygibbsw

Why use zur (zu+der) since Bushaltestelle is feminine?

January 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2043

@jimmygibbsw : zu is always a dative preposition. In the dative case (which expresses location) the die changes to der. See http://german.about.com/library/blcase_dat.htm

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lily.chau

I was wondering the same thing, thanks for your explanation!!!

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrPepito

Same for me. Cool

May 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spinnity

Would "I am walking to the bus stop" also be a reasonable translation? Gehen - going or walking, right?

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PollyPeanut

I am having the same problem. Anyone with a good explanation?

September 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lostinhull

afaik Gehen means 'to go' - it implies walking (as opposed to 'Fahren') but does not mean 'to walk'

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, that sounds like a reasonable translation to me.

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malachyxx

I find it easy to remember this word because "Bushaltestelle" starts with "Bus-halt", and obviously halt means STOP in English, so, that's how I remember it. :) Hope it helps!

March 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lamosca.24

ich gehe nach haus - ich gehe zur Bushaltestelle. What is the nach/zu rule???

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Short version: nach with cities (nach Berlin) or countries that do not take the definite article (nach Deutschland) and in the fixed phrase nach Hause; in when going into something (e.g. a building: in die Bank) or with countries with an article (in die Schweiz), and zu in other cases (e.g. to a friend's house, to the bus stop: zu meinem Freund, zur Bushaltestelle).

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lamosca.24

thank you very much! it was so helpful :)) deserved lingot

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sorin.bolos

Can someone tell me why "I am going to A bus stop" is wrong? Where is the definite article in the german senyence?

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lostinhull

'zur' is a contraction of 'zu der' - and there's your definite article

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nxexa89

In addition, "zur" or "zu der" means "to the", not "to a".

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobJenki2

What is the difference between "zur" and "aus" ?? Is it just that "zur" means mostly to the and that "aus" means mostly to ??

May 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markbooth

"aus" means from.

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

More specifically, aus basically means "from out of" or "from the inside of".

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobJenki2

What does "zur" mean then??

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's a contraction of zu der = to the (for a feminine noun).

The equivalent for masculine and neuter nouns is zum which is from zu dem.

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobJenki2

Thanks so much, Ich danke dir sehr!!

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaramataBG

Are these annoying contractions compulsory? They sound like slang... I can't believe that such punctual people as the Germans have allowed something like this in their official language.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Some such as im, zum, zur, fürs are pretty much compulsory, yes.

Others are squarely in the realm of "colloquial" language, such as mit'm.

And some are somewhere in the middle of "possible even in reasonably standard writing but not compulsory"; I'd say hinters, hinterm belong here.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaramataBG

So it would be perceived as an error if one uses the non-contracted forms in official communication :O

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fencing_girl

While I haven't tried this could Bushaltestelle also mean 'bus shelter'?

February 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No; a Haltestelle (stopping place) is just a bus stop, not a shelter.

A "bus shelter" is a Wartehäuschen (little waiting house) or, especially if it's just a back wall and a roof and little side walls but nothing at the front, a Fahrgastunterstand (place for riding guests to stand under).

(The second is a bit more technical jargon - I think many people would just call it a Wartehäuschen even if it's one of the more minimalistic modern constructions.)

February 5, 2017
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