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"Siúlaimid ón gcearnóg go dtí an phictiúrlann."

Translation:We walk from the square to the cinema.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kjsoda
kjsoda
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This is more of a suggestion than a question or pure comment: If you wanted to better support American English, this sentence would often be translated as, "We walk from the square to the movies." (A theater that shows films is often colloquially referred to as "the movies." See, for example, the song from the 1982 film "Annie" entitled "Let's Go to the Movies.") We typically do not often use the term "cinema" to mean the place where films are shown but rather as the study or art of film.

Technically, I am not sure if movies would have been rejected. I tried it before, and it was rejected so now I generally only translate "phictiúrlann" as "cinema." Again, just a suggestion; it's not necessary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thyo88
thyo88
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I translated it as theater, which is the word I and many Americans use for the place where people go to watch movies, and my answer was also rejected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's possible that Duolingo would have accepted "movie theater", but a "theatre" is where people go to see live actors perform a play, and amharclann is the Irish for "theatre".

On kjsoda's original point, the NEID does include "to go to the movies" - dul chuig an bpictiúrlann as an example of translating "to the movies" into Irish, but the closest idiomatic match in Ireland is actually "to the pictures", which gives us "to go to the pictures" - dul chuig na pictiúir.

Note also that, at least in some dialects, go dtí an phictiúrlann would imply going as far as the cinema, but not actually going inside to watch a film, whereas chuig implies going for the purpose of participating or attending.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thyo88
thyo88
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I appreciate the information on the other Irish phrases.

Your first paragraph leaves out the bit I was commenting on, though. For Americans, a theater isn't just the name of the place where you go see a play. It's also the place where you go see movies. The first entry in dictionary.com includes movies as well. It just seems weird to me that it's still not acceptable as an answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I did respond to the bit you were commenting on - I suggested that "movie theater" might be a useful alternative answer, but that "theater" on it's own could be confusing.

I just went to Bing.com's news search, set it to the US, and searched for "a new theater". All of the results on the first page referred to "performing arts" type theaters, except for one from a business magazine discussing a business that manages movie theaters.

Then I did a general search for "we went to the theater", and in fairness, there were some hits that clearly referred to going to a building called a theater to see a movie. But they were a small minority of those responses, and were clearly dwarfed by the number of hits for "we went to the movies" (dozens versus thousands).

You're right to suggest that the task of translating a text does require a degree of cultural adaptation, but that cuts both ways, and even in American English, "theater" is sufficiently ambiguous that it's a poor choice in this. Even some Americans would be confused by the use of "theater" in this sentence, whereas I doubt that "movie theater" would cause any such confusion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Looking at this again, US English is losing it's synonyms as it continues in the process of becoming a trade language. In 1967 cinema, movie theatre et cetera would have been much more common than the present. Now you'll seldom hear anything except 'the movies' or just the name of the individual film being seen.

I'd guess in another 50 years British English will still be rich in synonyms but US English, will be more even more sparse than at present.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfbecks17
jfbecks17
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I doubt it Stan. We'll just have different synonyms between the 2 of us.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelan585200
Kelan585200
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Pictúirlinn would probably most accurately translate to the old time phrase of picture house as cinemas used to be called

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indicosa
Indicosa
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Why is it "the square" when there is no article in the irish sentence? Or is "ón" = os an?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

You almost had it! ón is a contraction, but of ó an.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
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So does "square" purely mean the main city center ("the heart of downtown" as I think many Americans might think of it), or does it equally well mean the geometric shape with four congruent sides and π/2 angles??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

cearnóg means a shape with 4 equal sides and 4 90° angles.

You can learn your shapes, colours and numbers here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iad58g
iad58g
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Cute, but what a horrible English accent!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's not an English accent - it's an Irish accent!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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Good one!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NJI741534

And you can learn flags at the same time!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darth8863

I put "theater" for "phictiúrlann". That should count, no?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The Irish for "theatre" is amharclann.

This issue is discussed in considerable detail in the earlier comments on this exercise.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

I am sure Americans are familiar with other words besides " the movies". How about the famous Rocky Horror line " at the late night double feature picture show"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfbecks17
jfbecks17
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We're familiar. It just seems that "movies" would be a valid translation.

1 week ago