"I do not have any evidence."

Translation:Je n'ai pas de preuve.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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Why is it ". . .pas de preuve," but ". . . aucune preuve"? Why the use of "de" in one construction but not the other?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

To understand why de is used in one expression and not in the other you need to be aware of the following three points:

Point 1: In a negative sentence where the noun is the direct object of the verb being negated, de is commonly used instead of an indefinite or partitive article (un, une, du, de la, and des).

examples

Il n’y a pas assez de verres. - There isn’t enough glasses.

Ne pas faire de bruit. - Don’t make a noise.

il n'y a jamais de viande. - There is never any meat.

Point 2: Generally nouns require a determiner and the negative adjective ne ... aucun acts as a determiner (so no need for an article, see point 3)

examples

Cela n'a aucun intérêt. - That is of no interest.

Je n'ai aucune idée. - I have no idea.

Je n’en ai aucun - I don't have any.

Point 3: There is at most one determiner per noun except in the constructs:

• definite article + cardinal number + noun

• possessive adjective + cardinal number + noun

• demonstrative adjective + cardinal number + noun

• tout + definite article

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciriart
CiriartPlus
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It would be really great if a french speaker could respond to this question. .. inquiring minds want to know!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lara663369

i have the same question as your first one. the answer to the second question is it is the structure... always de after pas, but never after aucun ne...pas de ne...aucun

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schergjd
schergjd
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Shouldn't "I don't have any..." be n'ai rien rather than n'ai pas?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenteagirl67

ne...rien can't be used in this context because it means "nothing" and it can't be followed by a noun (just like you can't say "I have nothing of books" in English to mean "I have no books"). That being said, you could potentially use "ne...aucun" here instead of "ne...pas." You can check out this site for an explanation of the French negative prounouns and when to use them: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pronouns_negative.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingolizard
Lingolizard
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Isn't "evidence" a word in French?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leny.Philippesen
Leny.Philippesen
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False friend my friend, in a sentence like 'C'est une évidence' or 'C'est évident', it means 'It's obvious'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stopbeingsoanno

Thanks Leny.philippesen, that is very helpful, have a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Je.ne.sais.quoi

It seems that the french word《évidence》might be understood as the english word "evidence". But according to www.linguee.com it is more commonly translated as "obviousness" or less commonly "blatancy". And another option is 《témoignage》which can be taken to mean "testimony" or "evidence". Overall though, 《preuve》 seems to be a better choice as it's main meanings seem to be "evidence" or "proof".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuzanaLagova

"I have no proof"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tardusbubulcus
Tardusbubulcus
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The answer translates English "evidence" as "preuve". But, in English anyway, they do not mean the same thing. Proof is absolute- it decides the matter. Evidence is partial and can be circumstantial: it does not decide the matter- it tends towards a decision. Maybe this nuance is not there in French and this translation is correct. A good joke example is the following: finding a fish in the milk is strong evidence that the milk has been watered down, but it is not proof.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenteagirl67

This is a very interesting point. Thank you for bringing it up! You could say "un indice" in French to mean information that is (as you say) partial and circumstantial. It is often translated as "a clue." However, for the most part, this distinction is not really made in French in my experience. The word "preuve" is used a lot in trials and police investigations where "evidence" is used in English, and there are expressions like "faute de preuves" which means "for lack of proof."

That being said, there are other ways to insert uncertainty into a sentence in French. For example, you could use the conditional tense and say "La police aurait des preuves," which means "the police allegedly have evidence."

I hope that helps clarify a bit.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gori16

So, "je n'ai aucun de preuves" is not right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThneedEmbargo

Correct. Duolingo doesn't like the "de." Even after reading the various comments I am still confused. I thought ne...aucun(e) could be followed by "de"...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobWells5

Is there no difference between 'evidence' and 'proof' in French? There is in English law. Presumably the "vid" comes from the Latin and implies that something 'seems' to be proof

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OLSPice
OLSPice
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Is "Je n'ai aucune preuve." wrong?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Je.ne.sais.quoi

I think that 《Je n'ai aucune de preuve》 should be fine. You just need to include the article 《de》

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wmconlon
Wmconlon
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This is marked incorrect

6 months ago
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