Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"No me he sentido bien."

Translation:I have not felt well.

5 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 14

Is this also correct? "I have not been feeling well". DL says that the two correct translations are "I have not felt very well" and "I have not felt well".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
  • 24
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15
  • 15
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1569

With only the string of words "No me he sentido bien," I'd even say that the English translation is better rendered as "I have not been feeling well" than "I have not felt well." I understand that the Spanish is present perfect, not present progressive perfect--but the English "I have not felt well" does not stand alone as well as "I have not been feeling well" does (the present perfect English translation is improved with a "for/since" phrase added to it e.g. "I have not felt well since last weekend"). If the Spanish can stand alone well without additional adverbial phrases, then it's more akin (functionally) to the English "have been ___ing", at least in this example.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 20

I agree with you. Every time somebody tells me "No me he sentido bien" what I understand is "I have not been feeling well" which is the answer I submitted, yet it's still marked incorrect after so long.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I have not been feeling well is present perfect progressive. That would be No he estado sintiendo bien. Since Spanish has progressive tenses, it reserves progressive translations for those Spanish tenses. English uses progressive tenses a lot more often than Spanish or any other language I am aware of, so in reality progressive translations will be commonly used for the standard tenses in Spanish, but I do understand that Duo is trying to make us aware that they are used in different ways.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 20

I know they are different tenses, but it's not uncommon for two different languages to use different tenses to express the same idea, if they want to teach the different ways tenses can be used in Spanish, there are other far better sentences they could use.

  • María no se ha sentido bien desde sus últimas vacaciones = Mary has not been feeling well since her last vacation.
  • Hasta ahora el equipo se ha sentido bien a pesar de jugar dos veces a la semana = So far, the team has been feeling well despite playing twice a week.

I'm not trying to say that the Spanish present perfect tense equals the English present perfect progressive tense, but there will be some instances in which you will need to use a different tense just for it to make sense in both languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I do understand what you are saying. It is artificial constraint. All I am saying is you have been operating under the same constraint since you began this course. Although Duo accepts What are you doing as translation for Qué haces because it is really the only way to ask that, it doesn't accept the answers to that question in the progressive. In English you would answer I am working or I am reading, etc. But the Spanish answers are in the present tense and Duo expects English present tense answers (Yo) trabajo = I work, leo = I read. This is not the same convention used on Duo for languages like German and French which have no progressive tenses. In those languages Duo accepts and often prefers progressive translations for the various tenses they are commonly used in English. Certainly I think a disclaimer or two might be helpful so that the users understand better, but the tense for tense translation is applied quite consistently and is clearly Standard Operating Procedure in Spanish. Now in the section where you are translating whole texts that is not used as in THAT section, the grammar syntax and symantics of both languages need to be explored more. I have often felt a little more detail and context for the sentence would be helpful. But in this case I feel that the point (for Duo) is not why it would be the present perfect in English as opposed to the present perfect progressive, but that it would be the present perfect in Spanish. And their convention is tense to tense. There are perhaps many improvements that Duo might make, but I think it is an incredible tool once you recognize its limitations. And it is free.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/online4earth

I agree, this is the better translation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anthonyhill780

Who the heck are you Owlspotting?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Why the attitude?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Actually, "I have not felt very well" = "No me he sentido muy bien", in my opinion...

About the one you suggest, the literal translation would not be that, but it is the same message, I think.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clyde_the_camel

"No he estado sintiéndome bien."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davemcarlson

I put the same thing and I think it's okay.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betubaba

Can anyone suggest the purpose of "me" here ? Even if it is omitted the translation remains same

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 23

In Spanish they distinguish between to feel feelings/sensations from outside yourself and to feel inside yourself. The latter is reflexive. Since this distinction is not made in English it cannot be seen in the translation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

I like that explanation. Never thought of reflexive verbs that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

I got the correct translation despite not knowing what the me was there form. I thought se was to indicate reflexive. Why the "me."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 14

The actual reflexive pronoun (me, te, se, nos, os, se) depends on who the speaker is. Since the speaker is "yo" in this sentence, the reflexive pronoun is "me". http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/85

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 11
  • 6
  • 1259

Why is this reflexive? The subject "I", as me myself am saying "I have not felt well". In what other manner could the subject of this sentence be confused that a reflexive 'me' is needed to make it clearer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 23

sentir to feel sensations from outside yourself/from outer parts of yourself: he sentido un viento frio/I have felt a cold wind

sentirse to feel from inside yourself/the real self: me he sentido bien/I have felt well. Me siento feliz/I feel happy

The distinction is made in Spanish and a lot of other languages but not in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 14

sentirse and sentir can be considered different words. sentir by itself means "feel" in the sense of using your hands to touch something, sentir bien means to do that well (even if it doesn't make any sense in context). So the "se" isn't used for clarification, it's used because it's part of the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamHud8

Why is "I do not feel well" wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Duo wants you to translate tense for tense. No me he sentido bien os present perfect, which is a past tense (despite the name) which has some impact on the present. I have not felt well open whether you currently feel well or not. That would be provided by context, of which Duo provides none. You may wake up feeling good, but when someone asks you why something wasn't done or done well, you would say,, "I have not been feeling well" At any rate, the use of the perfect tenses is quite parallel between languages. But parallel use is not necessarily a requirement for Duo. In other language courses on Duo in languages like French and German which do not have a progressive tense, Duo allows the translation of that language's present into either the present or the the present progressive. Ich spreche can be translated as either I speak or I am speaking. But Yo hablo can only be translated as I speak as I am speaking is reserved for Yo estado hablando, even though the use of the progressive in Spanish is quite different than its use in English where it is the default tense for action verbs to indicate that the action is happening now. This standard is set so Duo knows you are not missing the structure of the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/momisha

Have not been feeling well and have not felt well are different tenses are they not?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn-H
Jocelyn-H
  • 21
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Why doesn't "I have not felt fine" work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

I have no heard that in American English. Although, we do respond when asked "I feel fine". Odd isn't it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn-H
Jocelyn-H
  • 21
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I see your point, but I don't think it's too weird to be honest. It's probably not something I'd say, but I still think it should be correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feochka
feochka
  • 22
  • 20
  • 20
  • 1339

Why "very" is necessary? I haven't felt myself well Where is the mistake?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Very should not be necessary as there is no equivalent in the Spanish. The problem with your answer is using the reflexive pronoun myself in English. We don't use it most of the time in English and if we do we would tend to add to be. When you just say that you felt yourself well, it sounds as if you used your hands to feel your body, perhaps for an injury. It suggests something different from the meaning here. I have not felt well is the best translation

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 14

When Duolingo finds an extra word it doesn't expect, like "myself" in your answer, it seems to find another of its valid answers with some word (any word) in that position. "I haven't felt very well" must be in its list of valid answers, so it's guessing that's what you meant. I wish they'd just flag the extra word, maybe by crossing it out in the corrected answer.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I think you are asking a lot of the programmers, especially considering some of the messes they sometimes probably have. I doubt the program analyzes your answer very much. It just compares it to a list of acceptable answers.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heiran
heiran
  • 19
  • 11
  • 10

Why is it not "i had not felt well"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bsimmo14
bsimmo14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9

Had not and have not are different tenses. I'm sure we'll learn the other one soon. I think it is along the lines of había/habían/etc. instead of he/ha/han. Idk I'm rusty

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofiacfguidi
sofiacfguidi
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

Isn't "felt" and "been feeling" basically the same thing, because when I right it down it shows up as incorrect and I think it should be correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I have been feeling is a different tense. It is the present perfect progressive. In English we use this tense quite a bit. Spanish has this tense although it is only used to emphasize the continuous or progressive nature of the verb. It would be translated as yo he estado sintiendo bien. Emphasizing that you have been feeling well in the present perfect progressive in Spanish would be very unusual. It might indicate, for example, that although you are actually sick, you have been feeling well. If you take a Duo course on a language that doesn't have progressive tenses, (like German, for example) then that translation would be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ssophd
ssophd
  • 19
  • 12
  • 7
  • 2
  • 2

what is "me" for?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

The verb here is the reflexive verb sentirse which refers to how you feel as in your state of being. Spanish uses reflexive verbs considerably more often especially when it comes to things relating to what is happening to your body or mind. But you do have to pay attention to how they are used as some reflexive forms have an unexpected change in meaning. One of the most common of those is Ir and irse, but there are plenty more.

Spanishdict.com always lists the reflexive meaning of verbs as well as the pronominal ones (which is when the object pronoun is required but does not refer back to the subject)

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/sentir

. Normally reflexive verbs are ones that are transitive, but a couple of exceptions do exist like morirse.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faith-Angel

I put "I have not felt fine" and it would not accept it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Choice991806

Why is " I am not feeling well" wrong ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

That the wrong tense. I am not feeling well is present progressive. English uses the present progressive in many instances where other languages use the present. In languages which do not have progressive forms, Duo accepts and even encourages translating the present of that language as the English present progressive. But since Spanish does have progressive tenses, Duo generally reserves it for tense to tense translations, despite the fact that its use is much more restricted.

But there's an additional issue. Most of the above was explained to prevent a similar question when translating a present tense sentence. This sentence is actually in the present perfect. Despite the word present in the term, the present perfect is actually a past tense. It talks about a past event that has present significance. I have read that book. The reading is in the past, but means you don't have to read it again and you know what it is about in the present. In this particular case, I have not felt well can be somewhat ambiguous as to whether you are currently feeling well, but the problem definitely started in the past.

So possibilities are:

No me siento bien = I do not feel well or in all worlds except for Duo's tense for tense policy I am not feeling well.

No me estoy sintiendo bien = the Spanish present progressive which is only used to emphasize the ongoing nature of the verb. It would always be translated as I am not feeling well.

No me sentía bien. I did not feel well (sentí is also possible but less likely as feelings often don't have a clear start and end time)

No me he sentido bien = I have not been feeling well

The perfect tenses are formed by conjugating the verb Haber (which only is translated as have because our perfect tenses use have. It has nothing to do with possession) and using the past participle of the verb in question. It is the tense of Haber that differentiates the perfect tenses. So in other words the past perfect uses the past tense of Haber (mostly the imperfect) and the future perfect uses the future of Haber etc.

No me había sentido bien=I had not felt well (prior to another past event)

No me habré sentido bien = I will not have felt well. This particular sentence is less likely but would indicate that at the point in the future you are talking about, you will have not been feeling well for a period of time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shanedrago3

Why do you need the me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Because the verb here is sentirse, not just sentir. Reflexive verbs are very common in Spanish. In this case it makes some sense. You use sentir if you feel something, but sentirse about how you feel yourself to be. But it is a good idea whenever you encounter a new reflexive verb to look it up as the reflexive verb may vary from the standard verb in surprising ways soemtime

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OMichaelMageo

Putting it simply, to feel is reflexive verb, so "me" is necessary

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Michael Wilson and Lynette, I believe that what makes it not simple is that "to feel" in the tactile sense would be the "outward" type of feeling that someone above explained, and takes an object. But, the inner feeling (about emotions or health, as Lynette went to a lot of trouble to try to clarify) takes the reflexive treatment.

Examples: (tactile) I have felt the grit of the sandpaper, and it is too harsh for using on fine furniture. Or, I have felt the dots on the special Braille pages, and I admire the blind people who train themselves to use those to read.

Inner feelings or health (sentiments, from the similar root word, or judgements about one's well-being) need the reflexive form: "I (myself) have felt this before."

BUT! I had another question - how would a Spanish speaker say, "I have felt GOOD (meaning happy or satisfied) about the rookie Quarterback's muscle gain since college."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

That would also use sentirse. Me he sentido bien sobre el crecimiento del músculo del mariscal de campo del novato desde el colegio/la universidad

There are a couple of issues here though. First, since this is present perfect I wasn't quite sure whether I should use desde or desde hace. Have you felt that way since he was in college or have you felt that way about the improvement after he left college.

Also I take the English phrase I feel good about seems more like satisfaction and hopeful anticipation rather than outright happiness, but I have no idea about the connotations in Spanish. If the person is happy I would expect either Estoy feliz (he estado feliz) or me alegro (me he alegrado), but again this probably would have regional, social and individual variations. I had to look up rookie quarterback. It's not used much in Spanish speaking countries.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languistouno

Would "I have not been feeling well" be acceptable (it wasn't)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I have not been feeling well is a valid translation for this sentence, but does not meet Duo's tense for tense convention. This convention is only meant to allow Duo to dictate which tense it wants you to practice, not to try to make a direct comparison of the uses of the tenses in each language. This is especially true with the progressive tenses which English uses to a much greater extent than other European languages. Some languages like French and German don't even have progressive forms. In those languages the progressive tense is regularly translated into the relavant simple tense and vice versa. But Spanish does have progressive tenses. So FOR THE PURPOSE OF THESE EXERCISES ONLY, the past progressive that you used would be No me he estado sentando bien. As a practical matter, I don't think a Spanish speaker would be likely to use the past progressive here, but that doesn't mean that the English past progressive might not be used in translation were the goal simply meaning and not drilling tenses and vocabulary.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reichdalmeida1

I didn't feel well - entirely correct though considered wrong

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 23

Duo wants the Sp present perfect he sentido to be translated into the En. present perfect I have felt and not imperfect/preterito "I did not feel"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
  • 22
  • 20
  • 17
  • 135

Still, it did accept 'didn't' in a negative sentence in an earlier exercise (can't for the life of me remember .. it was something 'she' didn't know/understand/ or something similar.). I can see a difference hetween 'I haven't felt well' [for a while] and 'I didn't feel well' [so I left], but would a Spanish person never use 'no me he sentido bien' for the latter?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Well, I think that this is one of the clear cases when the present perfect is clearly used for something different. I haven't been feeling well generally implies a longer period of time and is sometimes unclear as to whether you are feeling well now, but it does imply that if it has changed, it has only just changed. I didn't feel well speaks to any point in the past, from 5 minutes ago to 5 years ago or more. And it carries no implication that you might not yet be feeling well. The use of the perfect tenses, especially the present perfect, varies somewhat from region to region in Spanish speaking countries, but this sentence is pretty much the poster child for the present perfect tense everywhere.

Duo also uses a tense for tense convention, although it breaks its own convention for no apparent reason from time to time. But this is a teaching convention, and is not meant to imply that this is necessarily the best way to translate something per se. It is just so you recognize which tense is actually being used in Spanish and, when translating from English to Spanish, it can show you what tense you are to practice. This is most significant with the Spanish present tense which in the real world would be translated into the English present progressive. Qué haces will have to be translated into the progressive in common speech as What are you doing, but the fact of the matter is the answer is the answer to that question will also be in the progressive in English, although Duo will have you use only the present tense for sentences like yo trabajo or yo lavo los platos. In other languages where there is no progressive tense, like French or German, Duo encourages the use of the progressive to translate the present. But because of its desire to control which tense is used, in Spanish Duo tries to reserve the progressive English sentences like I am working for the Spanish form Yo estoy trabajando. But this is not meant to imply that this would be the appropriate real world translation, as the Spanish speaker uses the progressive tenses much less frequently. It is only used to emphasize the ongoing nature of the action. But, for the most part, the use of the present perfect is consistent between the two languages, although the past perfect in English may be translated as the imperfect in Spanish. That is shown on Duo as well, but then English has no equivalent tense to the imperfect.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KshitizSha7

Is there a way to just.....look at a verb and know if it's reflexive or not?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Most verbs have reflexive and pronomial forms. The trick is to recognize reflexive uses and situations, although sometimes the reflexive form alters the meaning in a somewhat unexpected way. As a general rule, things that you do to (and to some extent with) your body are reflexive in Spanish and most statements about your state of mind. This link is really somewhat technical in parts, but towards the bottom it gives the most common reflexive verbs using his complex algorithm. If you look at them as a whole, you may be able to recognize some patterns.

https://www.realfastspanish.com/vocabulary/spanish-reflexive-verbs

Of course, I highly recommend the frequent use of a dictionary. Every time you look up a verb, check for pronomial and reflexive forms. This also helps you learn any surprising differences in meaning.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileenGonz14

I have not been feeling well.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keswani123

Me niether i have not felt well

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alethea436961

so WHY are we NOT using se here? Why are we using me? Would "he sentido bien" work here as well?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

We essentially ARE using se because, although the infinitive of reflexive and pronomial verbs has the attached se, that se is always conjugated to match the subject of the sentence. So, eliminating the negative and the present perfect tense for the moment for clarity, to "conjugate" to feel well in Spanish in the present tense would be as follows.

Yo me siento bien Tú te sientes bien El/ella/usted se sientes bien Nosotros nos sentimos bien Ellos/ellas/ustedes se sienten bien.

This pattern holds true even when the verb is used in its infinitive form with the object pronoun attached, so you would also say

No quiero levantarme. I don't want to get up.

The verb sentir exists ONLY as either a transitive verb or a pronomial/reflexive verb. So there is always an object. You can either feel the material/the heat or whatever external thing, or you can essentially Feel yourself to be well, sick, happy, etc.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Sentir%20

This means that No he sentido bien cannot be correct as is.

Of course the se passive voice always uses se, but that is simply because the passive voice makes the object of the active voice sentence the subject of the passive voice sentence. But actually the Spanish se passive is essentially saying that the verb performs itself.

Aqui se habla español. Spanish is spoken her, or more literally Spanish speaks itself here.

Él hambre se puede derrotar. Hunger can be defeated or more literally Hunger can defeat itself.

All these cases will have a third person subject.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrSarahV

I translated this as 'I didn't feel well' as I thought this got the sense of the sentence, as I understood it, better. This is because I thought 'No me he sentido bien' indicates as a period of feeling ill that is now over with (while the literal translation of 'I haven't felt well' would actually, in the English, imply that the period of feeling unwell is still continuing).

Does this sound like a fair interpretation of the Spanish, or am I missing something?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Spanish is one language that uses the present perfect pretty much exactly as English does. So any sense you get from the English perfect also applies to the Spanish perfect. Your sentence would use the imperfect. No me sentía bien.

5 months ago