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"Él me afecta."

Translation:He affects me.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jonnay101

How does someone 'affect' you? This is an odd sentence in English, i've never used it in my life

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

To 'affect' is to have an effect, often emotional. If a person has an influence on you, they are 'affecting' you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnay101

I know the meaning it just sounds wrong to say 'he/she affects me'. I've never heard it in my life. Just a bit odd.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabejosh
gabejosh
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I agree, it does sound odd in English. But this is not the first one in Duolingo so we just have to live with it. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laraik
Laraik
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Im seriously impressed by all the languages you're learning! Which one would you say you're most confident with?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabejosh
gabejosh
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actually French, German and Russian. I just started Spanish earlier... I learned these when I was young, so I feel more comfortable with them. All the others are struggle, but I like learning languages, that's all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

we can always report it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

If it affects you that much....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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I think in English you will most likely say "He gets to me".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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For "he gets to me", could I say "Él me molesta" or "Él me fastidia" (he bothers or annoys me)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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You could use either one as they are synonyms and fairly common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arissston
arissston
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It is because you are in Spanish lessons! Not English lessons. Duo teaches you, what it's like in Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianauna
adrianauna
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'He/she has an affect on me' is also uncommon, but gets the point across.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Unfortunately, the correct English in your (adrianauna's) sentence would be "He has an effect on me."

That which "affects" you has an "effect" on you.

Something that "affects' has an "effect."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

afectar also means to affect badly or to upset, so this could translate to "he upsets me" which is perfectly fine as a standalone sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BjornWutherheiml

"He bothers me" Not accepted. 2/22/16 :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dave.pretty
dave.pretty
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I do not find this sentence odd at all. But then I've lived in California.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maia_Francis18

That is very tru

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicklearn

Used when you want to be vague, coy, demure, indirect...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

On the oddity of this sentence in English:

I believe the issue here is that it's much rarer to use a verb as general as "affect" when both the subject and direct object are people. I think that this may be because "affect" is so general of a word that it doesn't clarify whether the subject or the direct object are the instigators of the action. We know that the D.O. is affected. Did the subject actively do something that then directly or indirectly affected the D.O.? Maybe. Or, just as easily, the burden of action is on the D.O. itself. Perhaps seeing the subject arouses some feeling in the D.O. (even if the subject is a perfect stranger to the D.O.!), but the only active participant would be the D.O. his/herself! (Think about how childish it is to say, "The lamp made me angry!" and extrapolate that the subject could in fact have as much involvement in the D.O.'s feelings as a lamp sitting on a table.)

Usually we would clarify the relationship along these lines: "He turns off the nightlight when he goes to bed. He probably doesn't even know, but it affects me terribly." Since "affect" is so general, it's much most common to //turn the actions of the instigating party into an idea, "it."// The phrase, "It affects me," is more natural than, "He affects me," because the context of whatever "it" is almost always explains the relationship between the direct object and subject.

Still, though, "He affects me," is odder as a standalone sentence, it becomes normal enough with proper context. "I know we're no good for each other, it's just he affects me in ways you wouldn't even believe!" See how it doesn't really matter whose fault it is in this context? The speaker has feelings she just can't control, and they are connected to the subject of the sentence, "He." That's all you need to know. :)

Hope this was more illuminating than confusing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You are correct that it is entirely a matter of context, and there is one context where this formula is common. "He affects me" is a common standalone phrase among Pentecostal Christians when speaking of Jesus.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanNafziger

This is really interesting and makes a lot of sense, but I would also love to read a similar post about the use of 'afectar' in Spanish. Is it used similarly or is it more common to see it by itself?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Though quite long, that was awesome. One lingot for you, and hope others read it as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bryan.Anthony

I've heard this sentence before, or others like it. Especially in literature. Sure I don't hear it every day, but it definitely doesn't sound weird to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NLucchese

And why is "It affects me" incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatrinaMac4

Because él means he

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Just learned this: the gender-neutral pronoun in Spanish for "it" is "ello". You will close to never hear it though. Thus, él means only he, and not it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann.Hunter

When I moused over El, "it" was listed as one translation. Which confused me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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And ella means it too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kristinbunch

He gets to me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/55_dogfish

"he bothers me" should also be quite acceptable given that afectar means to affect badly or upset.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolWise1
CarolWise1
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What he says or does affects me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChazMinnic

When do I use "me" instead of "mi" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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  • Me (Spanish) is the normal object pronoun for the English "me" like in the sentence given to us here ("Él me afecta" = "He affects me.")

  • Mí (accented "i") is the Prepositional object as in "for me ["Ese libro es para mí" = "That book is for me."], or sometimes, "myself" as in "Por ahora tengo que pensar en mí." = "For now I have to think of myself." (www.spanishdict.com example)

  • Finally, "mi (no accent) is the English "my" as in "Ese es mi libro." = "That is my book."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

Wanted to try "He moves me", but chickened out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlieponies

It is a classy way to say "Damn I'm swooning"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timtower1

"He upsets me" is perfectly valid (and probably makes more sense), but the database rejects it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"He affects me" is now an accepted answer.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blankasg
blankasg
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"Él me importa" sería "he affects me" también???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L8rgator

Not to be confused with he INfects me...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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So... it can’t mean ‘affect’ in the sense of ‘affection’, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lolcay

Would it be okay to say "he is affecting me"? And how would you say "he affected me?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Yes. And, :"Él me afectó"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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When you comment on your own use of English it would be helpful if you said which of the many English dialects worldwide that you are referring to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

A good point in many instances.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathias255486

Is this a litteral translation of a phrase that makes perfect sense in spanish and hardly any in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Not really. Make sense to me.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learner918273645

Porque él cortó el queso.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stokesbarb

Could you translate this as "It affects me", if, for example, you had been talking previously about "el tiempo"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle_Frank

I know this doesn't exactly relate to the question, but would the word effect be different than the word affect in Spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kidflashjj12

Sugar Honey Ice Tea

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnSteam1

I've heard my Chilean mother-in-law use "se afecta" to mean that something really bothers someone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon_Rackley

Technically this is correct, but it is just not a normal way of saying this. It would sound more normal to say-He has an affect on me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah720662

How would you say, "It affects me?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antonio501883

So what is the Spanish for ' It affects me '?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

'Me afecta."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Él me afecta" is a weird sentence in Spanish. We do not say that a person "afecta". We can say: "Su muerte me afectó mucho", "La situación le afectó en su ánimo". Neither the meaning nor the tense are usually used in Spanish this way.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankEdger
FrankEdger
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Do the writers of these programs check with educated English speakers before providing the sentences we encounter? I'm working on four languages and frequently encounter "awkward" sentences to translate in all four. It's quite irritating!

7 months ago