"A fonte de água fica na cozinha."

Translation:The water fountain is in the kitchen.

August 31, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

The real question is what does "fonte de água" in a kitchen mean to a Portuguese speaker. Is it commonly used to refer to something found in a kitchen? If not, then fountain or source would be all right, but it is hard to believe that a kitchen would be built around a spring. If someone says there is a "fountain" in the kitchen, I would think maybe a decorative fountain, jeux d'eau. If I meant a fountain for drinking (where you bend over, turn the knob and slurp the water that spurts up), I would say "water fountain." BUT if it means the thing in the kitchen sink that you get water from, the word is "faucet" (marked wrong) or "tap." So, Portuguese speakers, what do you think of when you read this sentence?

January 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Your question is totally valid. It doesn't make sense in Portuguese too. Years ago most of the kitchens had a little reservatory (with or without a filtering device) called "talha" or "filtro (de água)". Nowadays is more common to use a "purificador (de água)" (an equipment to filter the water, generally located in the kitchen). In Brazil we don't drink the water we get directly from the plumbing (we would call it "água da torneira") even though it is perfectly potable (like in most cities). If is of interest: water fountain (where you bend over etc) is called "bebedouro". A spring can be "fonte" or "mina". Spring water is "água mineral".

February 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BGMarc

I want to know if it's the standard source of water that any speaker of English would call a tap. I have never seen or heard of a kitchen with anything that might reasonably be called a fountain. For which reason I answered "the tap is in the kitchen" which was wrong. Now I'm wondering what the hell a Brazilian kitchen looks like lol

February 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus

A tap is called "torneira", and we would use that word if we wanted to say "the tap is in the kitchen" or "I drink water from the tap". Fonte is source (in more ways than one, meaning it is used in journalism as well), and this duo sentence is unusual in Portuguese too! As I explained to another user, it could be a fountain, since it is possible that someone has one of those small zen fountains in the kitchen. I hope that helped. =]

May 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

Exactly. Still waiting for native speaker clarification :)

February 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

vivisaurus is a native speaker I think because of the blue circle and star around her profile photo

March 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

Aha, I missed that. Thank you, and Vivisaurus, I'm sorry.

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RaeOvHope

I always learn so much on these pages

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

So maybe they just mean "source." So we might say, "You can get water from the kitchen." Maybe the exterminator is there and needs to connect his equipment to a water source. That would make sense. He asks "where is the nearest water source?" and you say, "The water source is in the kitchen." But this sentence "The water fountain etc." can only mean a drinking fountain, where you bend over to slurp the water that spurts up.

February 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

I agree. So, just to remember, a drinking fountain (where you bend over ...) is called "bebedouro".

February 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

Great, thank you for the word. Now to get Duo to revise or drop the sentence!

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

There are small fountains that you could put in the kitchen. Scroll up to vivisaurus above.

November 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamie08MD

Hi all! :) Imagine that you are doing a renovation of the flat and want to say, that source of the water stays in the kitchen (=it is not moved to the bathroom). How would you change the sentence above? I wrote "The source of water stays in the kitchen." and it was marked wrong.

June 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus

Hey, Jamie08MD! In that context you'd say it the same way. You can suggest it to duolingo, and I would add a comment in the little box at the bottom of the report pop-up explaining what you just told us... In speech, we would probably clarify in some way; either by pointing or by saying:

"A fonte de água fica aqui na cozinha." -- The source of water stays here in the kitchen.
"A fonte de água fica lá na cozinha." -- The source of water stays there, in the kitchen.
"A fonte de água permanece aqui na cozinha." -- The source of water remains here in the kitchen.
"A fonte de água continuará aqui na cozinha." -- The source of water will continue to stay here in the kitchen.
"A fonte de água fica aqui na cozinha... e não no banheiro." -- The source of water stays here in the kitchen... not in the bathroom.

But mostly you'd know what people are saying (or vice-versa) because of the situation you're in, or the context at that time. I hope it helps! =]

July 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleWheatley

The spring water is in the kitchen - is wrong. The spring of water is in the kitchen is correct.

August 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus

Hi, DaleWheatley! I'm not sure if your comment is a question, or rant, or clarification, but either way, I'll go ahead and try to respond/add to it. The closest translation is actually "the water source is in the kitchen"... so the sentence is referring to the source of the water (or it could be the spring), and not the water itself, like the first sentence in your comment. Or an actual fountain. =]

September 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleWheatley

Thanks for the clarification!

September 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisGull

However, the correct answer is given as "The water fountain is in the kitchen", but in English it is implied that a fountain has to do with water and therefore "water" is unnecessary to specify, which Duolingo failed to acknowledge in my answer.

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus

Wait! Chocolate fountains exist!

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisGull

Yes, you are right! But then you have to specify that it is something other than a water fountain :) Fountain is, by definition, a source of water, similar to how saying "red blood" is superfluous because blood is implied to be red. Is it anything else than red (which exists for certain species), then you specify that it is an exception. But I can see the confusion on Duolingo, as I understand that "fonte" can be more than just a fountain, which is not the case in English, unless you add a modifier of some kind (e.g. fountain of youth).

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus

True. I think in this case they want the word "water" because it is mentioned in Portuguese too (and it could be omitted there, although "fonte" means "source" too). They usually require all words to be translated, but you could always make the suggestion directly to them and see if they add your answer. =)

December 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/roizhems

I used the contraction "fountain's" in place of 'fountain is'. My answer should not be wrong...

September 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In English we do not usually contract "is" with a noun, just because a noun with an " 's " is in its possessive form. We do contract pronouns with "is"

November 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels

I do that all the time! I'm a native English speaker, and ‘The water fountain's in the kitchen.’ is a totally normal thing for me to say (well, except for the part about having a water fountain in a kitchen).

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MonicaBurn0

I love these comments. I'm learning so much in addition to the languages I'm studying via Duolingo. What a lovely lot of people you all are! Obridaga

July 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/chet.deubn

ficar = stay/remain or to become

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloStanfield

also means "is found", where something "lives" -- this lamp lives in my room: fica no meu quarto.

June 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rt1983

I thought fica meant "stay with" or "go with"

October 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RabbitsRabbits

I think someone mistranslated "tap"? Because in the UK a tap is a fosset but in the US a tap is a source of water like a spring? Right?

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hausten

sounds correct as I said a water tap and while water tap has some implied tautology it was very common in the past to use both terms together.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels

In the U.S., you can also call a faucet a ‘tap’, although ‘faucet’ (note spelling) is more common.

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/geeaiye

water fountain in a kitchen ????

February 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Why not?

November 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rt1983

I thought fica meant "stay with" or "go with"

October 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Not always and not "with"

November 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/KylerDonlan

Could someone explain the difference between saying "fica na cozinha" and "e/esta na cozinha"? It seems that sometimes fica is appropriate but I haven't figured out why

April 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
  • fica = é (unmovable things)
  • está (movable things)
April 25, 2018
Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.